5

votes

How to afford paleo food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 06, 2011 at 1:53 PM

I recently moved to the USA and find it really difficult to stick to a paleo diet because all raw meat and produce is extremely expensive. I thought that food in the USA would be extremely cheap though I'm finding the prices impossible to afford (I am on the west coast which I know is more expensive than the rest of the country).

Meat is the biggest problem with nothing below $3 per lb for chicken breasts (Typical price over $5-6 per lb) and nothing below $5 per lb for red meat (including the lowest quality ground beef). I used to eat fish every week, typically salmon but now I've stopped altogether because I cannot afford any whatsoever here. Salmon is typically $11-16 per lb.

How do people in areas like this afford their food. Where can I find it cheaper?

091423a30c0188fbff51e39397e7e056

(384)

on January 26, 2012
at 11:33 AM

You're saying that you can survive and thrive on 900 calories a day?

A0934b08fe8603688d8840a21063d068

(80)

on August 18, 2011
at 11:24 PM

This is kinda where my wife and I are at the moment. We try to buy whatever we can. Eventually when we have more money, we'll definitely take the next step and go grass-fed.

A0934b08fe8603688d8840a21063d068

(80)

on August 18, 2011
at 11:19 PM

I never knew Craigslist had a section for that...That's AWESOME :D Thanks!

Dec2b5814c850b2b2510bd0a87bb4642

(163)

on August 02, 2011
at 03:50 AM

maybe she meant red meat

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on July 14, 2011
at 01:29 PM

Have any covered area out back? Chest freezer can go outside as long as it's not getting rained on.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on July 09, 2011
at 01:08 AM

I'm in rural Nevada. I just checked the pork chops I'm cooking for dinner - $1.69/lb. Local grassfed meat was in the range of $2.25/lb last time we bought a partial cow (going to do that again soon). My pay is not proportionately low compared to areas with a higher cost of living.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 07, 2011
at 11:28 PM

"and although i dont eat meat, i am happy with eating my chicken all the time" Chicken is a vegetable?

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on July 07, 2011
at 06:10 PM

@Futureboy Nope and yea my rent is pretty cheap. You can tell I don't live in NYC by what I do have, a fenced back yard :)

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:17 PM

UncleLongHair, where are you shopping. I regularly get grassfed rump roast from Whole Foods (in both DC and NoVA) for 6.99/lb. Non-grass fed is a lot cheaper when it's conventional, such as from Wegmans. Chicken is 2.29 a pound for whole chickens (organic, not pastured) from Whole Foods. Trader Joe's meat prices are definitely under $5/lb, especially for Butcher Shop stuff (conventional).

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:55 PM

I want to agree with you so much, but I have an egg intolerance (to the whites, I think...they give me diarrhea!) :(

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Whoa, I never thought to look on Craigslist. They truly have everything you could ever want on there. I did look on Craigslist for chest freezers, and found a ton of affordable ones in my area.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:53 PM

@Vrimj - do you live in NYC? If not your rent must be CHEAP! Otherwise, that's totally normal here!

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:49 PM

Where do you live? I am in the Washington DC area and don't think I've ever seen any kind of meat less than $5/pound except for soup bones or something. Generally conventional meat is $5-6/pound minimum and grass fed and/or organic is $8-10/pound at the cheapest. I have seen the same prices in NY, CA, NC, and Puerto Rico.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:45 PM

Taco Bell. As a child: Heaven. Now: Gross.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on July 07, 2011
at 12:11 PM

*giggles* also don’t have kitchen table, only table in the house is the artists drawing table and it is packed with drawing and felting supplies. Oh and the coffe table used for all other table purposes :)

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on July 07, 2011
at 11:46 AM

My chest freezer fits under the back of my kitchen table, which is otherwise dead space. They come in many different sizes and shapes!

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 06, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Sorry Cliff, once again I am going to have to disagree with you. Granted, I'm now up to 2lbs of grassfed beef a day with some veggies... but for "bare bones" paleo eating, I could subsist and still thrive fairly well (I have, in fact) on the meat+veggies.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:46 PM

A pound of grassfed meat and some veggies isn't that great of a diet.

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:23 PM

Hear, hear: "It may not affect you today, it may not affect you in 10 years, but chance are a crap diet WILL catch up with you." So many in the paleo/primal community are young whippersnappers (grin - no offense guys, really) who haven't been around long enough for it to "catch up with" them. Once you are over 50, there is a MUCH greater chance that you will see what all those years of fast food have done to you. (I traveled full time for several years and, man, I did love me some Taco Bell!)

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Hey Joshua - don't want to hijack the thread, but I'm in the Tampa Bay area too so I just wanted to wave and say "Hi".

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:10 PM

I would argue that it's not a significant percentage of the population that can get away with a crap diet. Some people can, and that's fine. But look at the large number of sick, obese, diabetic, people in the US. They're now paying the price of a crap diet. It may not affect you today, it may not affect you in 10 years, but chance are a crap diet WILL catch up with you.

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on July 06, 2011
at 03:48 PM

Your answer is simplistic and makes paleo out to be a magic bullet. Most people will benefit however there is a significant percentage of the population that will have no problems eating a crap diet. Also, a crap diet with calorie restriction negates many of the problems of a crap diet.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:53 PM

@nea well you can do that around where I live too, in fact hunting is something that happens all over the US, but then you are trading time instead of money.

86c9cfc15a450e21791a3e6ff52acf3f

(70)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Good question! I moved here from Sweden and I can find good prices on vegetables but yikes! The meat!! If you want good quality meat it cost a fortune! In Sweden I just got my own through hunting. Grassfed and all ;)

32123f4f25bdf6a7b70c9c2a719386ed

(396)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:30 PM

You can buy whole chickens way cheaper than chicken breasts and get more bang for you buck as you can make soup stock with the carcess and little bits of chicken left over. I never buy chicken parts.

Ffc7e0ecad8e8831b528c5d4921377cc

(942)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:22 PM

May I ask where you are on the west coast?

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:21 PM

frozen wild salmon burgers at costco!!

B61f6513a155cd874b42efdad55312f6

(231)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:11 PM

Is that for pasture raised/grass fed? That actually sounds normal for quality meats. For commercial meat, I can typically buy chicken/pork for anywhere between $1.7-2.50/lb, and red meat ranges from $1.99-8.99 depending on the cut. Salmon is usually expensive though, the cheapest I've ever seen it around here is $7.99/lb. maybe it's the specific grocery store you're shopping at? In general though, those prices are typical of grass fed.

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19 Answers

8
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:10 PM

If you don't mind me asking, where did you move from?

Yes, Paleo is expensive. And no, you won't really find it cheaper. At least here on the East Coast (Florida) Organ meats are normally considerably cheaper than $3/lb, however most fleshmeat is going to be $4+, and grassfed will be much more - unless (like many of us) you find a rancher who is willing co-op beef "on the hoof"... this is what I do to get my blanket $4/lbs beef.

My suggestion is to get a chest freezer, buy in bulk, learn to grow veggies and spices, and aquire a taste for organ meats. These are the ways you can save money. Also, if you can't swing 100% grassfed, don't sweat it. You should make it a goal to improve your food supply, but initially you can simply improve by moving forward with eating the correct whole foods before worrying about where they are sourced.

But you also have to be mindful of your lifestyle. I could live off less than $10/daily pretty easily - that would be a pound of quality grassfed beef and some veggies to go with it. If you can't do $10/daily for groceries, I personally would re-asses my priorities - I'm not trying to sound elitist, but diet only falls second to shelter in my personal heirarchy of needs.

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Hey Joshua - don't want to hijack the thread, but I'm in the Tampa Bay area too so I just wanted to wave and say "Hi".

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:46 PM

A pound of grassfed meat and some veggies isn't that great of a diet.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 06, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Sorry Cliff, once again I am going to have to disagree with you. Granted, I'm now up to 2lbs of grassfed beef a day with some veggies... but for "bare bones" paleo eating, I could subsist and still thrive fairly well (I have, in fact) on the meat+veggies.

091423a30c0188fbff51e39397e7e056

(384)

on January 26, 2012
at 11:33 AM

You're saying that you can survive and thrive on 900 calories a day?

7
B96486cc39cf24fdf259424f833a5d5b

(493)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:35 PM

Cow share is a great idea. Other than that, scope out the Farm and Garden section of Craigslist for free-range meats and eggs. I found a great source that way, with $4/lb grass-fed Longhorn beef (very lean). Their prices are extremely competitive. And don't get hung up on making sure there's an "Organic" label. My Longhorn rancher says his meat is less expensive because he didn't want to have to deal with the gov't's stringent rules/regs on making their place Organic, it would have raised their prices and compromised their cattle. The animals are free to roam from the day they're born until the day they "walk the green mile". (anyone in the Northwest who's interested, http://www.rockingmcattleco.com/ )

Farmer's markets, too, another very good way to find less expensive whole food.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Whoa, I never thought to look on Craigslist. They truly have everything you could ever want on there. I did look on Craigslist for chest freezers, and found a ton of affordable ones in my area.

A0934b08fe8603688d8840a21063d068

(80)

on August 18, 2011
at 11:19 PM

I never knew Craigslist had a section for that...That's AWESOME :D Thanks!

5
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on July 06, 2011
at 03:22 PM

Pay now or pay later. If you eat crap because it's cheap, you'll end up getting sick and at best you'll have to pay for a bunch of doctor's visits.

To save money you can get the stuff that most people don't like, that's the 75% ground beef, dark meat chicken, organ meats. All of that is quite reasonable at the butcher's counter.

This is part of a common rant of mine. Food is actually expensive and you need to budget for it. "Stuff you can eat" is cheap and not food. Here's a link to my usual rant:

https://sites.google.com/site/themikelinks/home/historical-prices-of-stuff-you-can-eat

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:23 PM

Hear, hear: "It may not affect you today, it may not affect you in 10 years, but chance are a crap diet WILL catch up with you." So many in the paleo/primal community are young whippersnappers (grin - no offense guys, really) who haven't been around long enough for it to "catch up with" them. Once you are over 50, there is a MUCH greater chance that you will see what all those years of fast food have done to you. (I traveled full time for several years and, man, I did love me some Taco Bell!)

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:10 PM

I would argue that it's not a significant percentage of the population that can get away with a crap diet. Some people can, and that's fine. But look at the large number of sick, obese, diabetic, people in the US. They're now paying the price of a crap diet. It may not affect you today, it may not affect you in 10 years, but chance are a crap diet WILL catch up with you.

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on July 06, 2011
at 03:48 PM

Your answer is simplistic and makes paleo out to be a magic bullet. Most people will benefit however there is a significant percentage of the population that will have no problems eating a crap diet. Also, a crap diet with calorie restriction negates many of the problems of a crap diet.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:45 PM

Taco Bell. As a child: Heaven. Now: Gross.

4
79dc9d47aeb85d76439c2aa0661df568

(355)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:58 PM

And eggs -- don't forget eggs.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:55 PM

I want to agree with you so much, but I have an egg intolerance (to the whites, I think...they give me diarrhea!) :(

4
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on July 06, 2011
at 02:18 PM

Learn to coupon. Just this week there were coupons for organic frozen vegetables and larabars. Safeway currently has a coupon out for $1 off your produce purchase of $5 or more and has also recently expanded their organic produce section. I also know there are coupons out right now for Helios Kefir. I know Foster Farms had coupons for fresh chicken breasts not too long ago. It's totally doable.

3
26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

on July 06, 2011
at 08:34 PM

I don't find paleo to be super-expensive, but:

*I usually eat frozen fruits (berries) and veggies, and grow some of my own

*I don't eat a ton of meat or seafood, around 1/2 lb per day, sometimes less.

*I don't hesitate to buy 'conventional' or frozen animal foods. One as poor as I simply can't afford grass-fed, fresh everything. I am always looking for a deal or a sale. Trader Joe's frozen seafood selection is the best!

*I have a chest freezer and buy in bulk and freeze for long-term use, whenever possible

*Eggs are a diet staple, and in my area you can find pastured eggs at farmer's markets for a great price

*I check out farmer's markers on a regular basis and try to make connections with local farmers who offer pastured animal products

*Most of my calories come from butter, cream, coconut oil, beef fat, and starches, which are all fairly inexpensive for how much energy they contain

*I eat white rice (in addition to potatoes) which is super-cheap and not perishable

*I almost never eat out.

I eat 3000+ calories per day of mostly 'primal' foods on a monthly grocery budget of (max) $200-250 per month. My boyfriend doesn't live with me, but he eats some of what I'm bringing home as well.

3
A45af235ed4dd0b4f548c59e91b75763

(1936)

on July 06, 2011
at 05:19 PM

What about hunting and fishing?? I'm still to practice what I preach on this one, but it dosen't get much more Paleo then fresh caught fish or a hunted critter on the bbq.

I also agree that not everyone is going to be able to afford local, grass fed, and/or free range. Some of us can't afford it regardless.. we have kids and mortgages that won't take a back seat.

I shop at a latin food store that sells ground and cheap cuts of beef for 2.49 a lb and pork butt and ribs for 1.99 a lb. I buy cheap blocks of cheese and 30 eggs for 3 bucks.

I also make my own full fat yogart and beef jerky, cause I can't afford (or find) healthy store bought selections.

Things I still want to do:

  • Start a garden
  • Fish more
  • Hunt.. at all

3
D2e6eb2ab91f5e11589cf34b44b8e4cd

on July 06, 2011
at 03:16 PM

My husband and I started out eating Paleo back in December and we adjusted our budget accordingly. We stopped going out to eat. We cut our housing expenses (found cheaper rent) and also cut our cable. We have 1 car payment instead of 2. We took that money and put it towards our grocery budget.

We also didn't start out on organic produce or grass fed beef. We bought whatever fruits and veggies were on sale, and also whatever meat and fish was on sale. We did what we could. The most important thing was cutting the grains/sugar/processed foods.

If you are interested, I did a blog post for eating Paleo on a budget- http://www.intentionalconsumption.com/index.php/2011/06/14/healthy-eating-on-a-budget/

A0934b08fe8603688d8840a21063d068

(80)

on August 18, 2011
at 11:24 PM

This is kinda where my wife and I are at the moment. We try to buy whatever we can. Eventually when we have more money, we'll definitely take the next step and go grass-fed.

3
776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

on July 06, 2011
at 02:22 PM

I don't know about the exact prices on the West Coast, but I've found that Trader Joes has really good deals on chicken, ground beef and salmon. Here in MA ground beef is $2.50/lb, which is a full dollar lower than any other supermarket's non-sale price. Salmon is usually $9-10 / lb frozen at Trader Joes.

My advice if you want to do Paleo style on a low budget is to embrace the tuberous carbs and fat. Splurge a little on coconut oil (you can buy a big tub on Amazon for a good price) and pastured butter. Buy sweet potatoes and white potatoes on the cheap. Slather them with butter. Use eggs for protein (lowest price can't be more than $1-2 / dozen). There have been a lot of threads here on how to do paleo for cheap - search for them.

2
D3b41912de6b7f60753b8e6063c9b05a

(362)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:10 AM

my grocery bill went down after going paleo.

I found my local farmer's market and made friends with the meat guys. I buy what is cheap. and I but a lot of something if they will give me a deal. (not like a side of beef, I dont have a chest freezer though I would love one). I now get emails from them "hey, I will give you 2 ribeyes if you buy 6 packs of pork chops".

also, I joined a produce share. ok, I get what I get and I just have to roll with it. but, I am a better cook for it.

2
E17addea7e1019a6cdbaec44f0b12728

on July 07, 2011
at 12:13 AM

Another couple: 1. Buy fish scraps. It is hit and miss, but it is a happy day when I get fist size chunks of tuna from Whole Foods for $1.5/lb! Woot! 2. Befriend a hunter & pay processing fee. $70 for a deer. 3. Gardening

and I know its been mentioned, but we do a lot of eggs.

2
34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:06 PM

Also this is not just a paleo eating problem - The US is in the toilet right now and inflation is hitting us pretty hard, food prices for ALL food is through the roof. Use the tips others have mentioned, shop at farmers markets, watch store sale ads and buy what you can find on sale. Pick up the sunday newspaper and grab the coupons in there, if you're lucky you can find some coupons that are for whole foods. Look online for coupons as well. Coupons.com is a good source. One thing that is always cheap is eggs and they're so versatile you can use them many ways to not get tired of them. Some grocery stores if you go in the morning they will have meat that they price really low to get rid of it because it's close to expire date, ask about that at your store.

1
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:40 PM

Wow. Our food prices are nothing like that, and I'm curious how much is regional difference and how much is ineffective shopping. If we pay more than $2/lb for conventional meat, it's a splurge.

If you haven't already, cut back in other areas to make room for food. Wearing secondhand clothing won't have a long-term effect on your health. Cutting cable or netflix is likely to have a positive long-term effect on your health. But I know very well that this is easier said than done for people already on a limited budget. A lot of "budget" paleo advice seems to be written by people who may have to watch their spending a bit in order to make payments on their new car and 4000 sq ft house, not people who are struggling to make the bare minimum - for whom immediate survival nutrition has to take priority over optimal future health, but who are still trying to make the best choices possible within that constraint.

Fully investigate your shopping options. Try neighboring (or even not-so-close) communities - you may still have to do some fresh-food shopping at local stores, but if you can do large freezer-stocking trips occasionally, it could be worth the gas money. Try stores you don't normally shop at. See if you can find grocery outlet, ethnic food, or restaurant supply stores. Find someone with a membership to Costco or other membership food store and see if you can go with them occasionally. Search craigslist or do a bit of driving of country roads and see if you can find stuff - we get eggs for $2 a dozen from a local farm - not free range, but raised outdoors, and much higher quality than conventional store eggs at not all that much higher a cost per serving. (We still get conventional store eggs too.)

Shop the sales, and look for things that have been priced to sell quickly. Look at the grocery circulars that come in the mail and at internet coupon sites - that can help you know which stores to go to without having to drive around. Most of the coupons are for processed junk, but occasionally there will be something useful - we recently got free eggs and sausage, and someone mentioned a $1 off produce coupon from Safeway.

If there is something you eat a lot of, ask around at various stores about bulk/case discounts (coconut milk, shredded coconut, canned fish, and other preserved-but-ok things like that are prime candidates for this). Compare with online prices.

Often stores will discount meat that is near its sell-by date or produce that is on its way out - get that, and then either use it or freeze/preserve it immediately (Our meat is generally 50% off, and we recently got cabbage for $0.25/lb and made sauerkraut). Be adventurous with cuts of meat you don't know how to cook, cheap veggies you're not familiar with, and so on.

Look on the internet for things that aren't available (or not available at a reasonable price) locally. Make sure the shipping cost doesn't outweigh the price difference (preferably order from somewhere with free shipping).

Limit food waste. Don't let stuff go bad - freeze it if you're not going to use it quickly. Make stock from the bones from any meat you get, along with veggie bits that you don't use.

Look into discount/free food programs (often run through churches) if you're really struggling. You may have to look around a bit to find out which actually has food you can eat - some have produce and stuff, while others are likely to be primarily processed food.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:49 PM

Where do you live? I am in the Washington DC area and don't think I've ever seen any kind of meat less than $5/pound except for soup bones or something. Generally conventional meat is $5-6/pound minimum and grass fed and/or organic is $8-10/pound at the cheapest. I have seen the same prices in NY, CA, NC, and Puerto Rico.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:17 PM

UncleLongHair, where are you shopping. I regularly get grassfed rump roast from Whole Foods (in both DC and NoVA) for 6.99/lb. Non-grass fed is a lot cheaper when it's conventional, such as from Wegmans. Chicken is 2.29 a pound for whole chickens (organic, not pastured) from Whole Foods. Trader Joe's meat prices are definitely under $5/lb, especially for Butcher Shop stuff (conventional).

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on July 09, 2011
at 01:08 AM

I'm in rural Nevada. I just checked the pork chops I'm cooking for dinner - $1.69/lb. Local grassfed meat was in the range of $2.25/lb last time we bought a partial cow (going to do that again soon). My pay is not proportionately low compared to areas with a higher cost of living.

1
2ab6415f5f20b8fe1d34a94c7be85e6a

on July 07, 2011
at 01:33 AM

Grow your own food buy in bulk lots of eggs and ground meat and remember eating healthy may cost more now but less later in the hospital with meds and with your health you will thank yourself later for putting the extra money towards your healthy nourishment.

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on July 06, 2011
at 04:12 PM

Watch the flyers for weekly sales, and check out stores like Trader Joe's and Sprouts. Find the ethnic stores in your area. They feature sales on non-standard cuts of meat and a larger selection of good-priced fish and seasonal vegetables. Depending on your location, you should be able to find nice prices on bones and fish-ends. Make friends with gardeners, they always have too much produce, especially Paleo-friendly foods like greens, which are harder to give away than tomatoes.

0
Dec2b5814c850b2b2510bd0a87bb4642

on August 02, 2011
at 04:03 AM

We buy organic chicken breasts, organic hamburger, steaks, free range eggs, canned wild caught salmon, organic tomato sauce, organic carrots, spinach, apples, avocados, frozen strawberries, blueberries and mango, almonds and I'm sure other things as well, all from Costco. We buy the coconut oil, coconut milk, shredded coconut, cashews, lara bars from Amazon. It takes some shopping around, but you can find better prices. We would like to do a cow share but dont have the money or freezer space right now. You have to pick and choose where you want to spend the extra money, if it comes down to eating Paleo but not being able to buy organic or grass feed, go with Paleo. As others have said, your eating out will decrease, and your health will be better. Cook larger portions, so that you will have leftovers and not have to work so hard. It will pay off!

0
6a2ea84c2477a67e2722cb7e88a7ca67

on July 07, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Im from the west coast, Nevada. And here we have weekly grocery store deals. For example, I usually buy my chicken breast for no more than $1.99 per lb. I do not eat red meat or pork, but my family does, and i dont spend a fortune. Costco or Sams Club wholesale are really good bets. Its kinda expensive up front, but really pays off in the long run. Also, I have found that Wal Mart is not too price friendly, or grass fed meat abundunt. Like i said, i always look at the weekly deals. If you dont get it by mail, look in the sunday paper. Farmers markets are really good when it comes to fruits and veggies. So maybe save money here, spend more there. It will even out. I just started the Paleo diet a couple weeks ago, and although i dont eat meat, i am happy with eating my chicken all the time. I dont get bored. Good luck!

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 07, 2011
at 11:28 PM

"and although i dont eat meat, i am happy with eating my chicken all the time" Chicken is a vegetable?

Dec2b5814c850b2b2510bd0a87bb4642

(163)

on August 02, 2011
at 03:50 AM

maybe she meant red meat

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 02:11 AM

Try to find a community garden. You'll get a lot out of the experience of growing your own food and save some money, which you can use to upgrade the food you have to buy. I'm in San Francisco and it is very expensive to eat well, but I feel it is worth it and have cut back in other areas. Here is my list of the most cost effective items:

Whole organic chickens from Trader joes 2.69Lb You get the meat and the bones. Good deal.

Organic chicken legs from Trader joes 1.99lb. I season these and confit them in my crockpot.

Pasture raised eggs: From 5.00 to 8.00 per dozen. Still the cheapest nutrient dense food around.

Organ meats: Chicken Gizzards and livers are really tasty and cheap even pasture raised. Heart is also a great deal and tastes like very lean steak. I get these at the farmers market. Around 3 something a pound.

Ground beef is really expensive pasture raised, but sometimes I find that if I buy more they give me a bulk price. 5.00lb instead of 6.99lb.

New Zealand and Australian lamb are pasture raised and reasonably priced at Costco. They also have wild caught salmon IQF there for a nice price. (16.00 3lbs)

Wild caught tiny USA shrimp 3.99lb. Other wild caught fish 3.99lb and up. Asian Markets in and around the city.

Coconut oil: online purchase in 1 gallon or bigger is cheapest.

Butter: 2.79 for 8 oz Kerry gold 4.59lb for trader joes organic butter. 7.99 for 2 lbs organic butter at costco. Find a friend who has a membership and go to costco and buy a bunch every once in a while.

On the veggie front you can get high value items like heirloom and dry farmed tomatoes in season for as little as 1-2 dollars a pound (perfect, but too small or irregular) if you buy a whole box of them. Make sauce!

0
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on July 06, 2011
at 02:24 PM

I just flat out don't have space for a chest freezer, I live in about 900 sq feet with two other adults.

I am working on finding someone who does and going in on a cow share with them where I subsidize there share in exchange for having a weekly meet pick up, but I haven't found a taker yet.

I might have more luck if I get involved in the local cross fit community.

In the meantime my answer is pork on sale since I am in the south and using IQF meats without quibble. Oh and conventional stuff a lot of the time too.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on July 07, 2011
at 11:46 AM

My chest freezer fits under the back of my kitchen table, which is otherwise dead space. They come in many different sizes and shapes!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:53 PM

@Vrimj - do you live in NYC? If not your rent must be CHEAP! Otherwise, that's totally normal here!

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on July 07, 2011
at 06:10 PM

@Futureboy Nope and yea my rent is pretty cheap. You can tell I don't live in NYC by what I do have, a fenced back yard :)

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on July 07, 2011
at 12:11 PM

*giggles* also don’t have kitchen table, only table in the house is the artists drawing table and it is packed with drawing and felting supplies. Oh and the coffe table used for all other table purposes :)

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on July 14, 2011
at 01:29 PM

Have any covered area out back? Chest freezer can go outside as long as it's not getting rained on.

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