2

votes

how do you store vegetables PROPERLY ?????

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 07, 2013 at 6:05 PM

im about to rip out my computer and throw it out the window.

i have tried searching for this simple answer to my simple question, and it seems every single website I go to has a different answer or gives completely contradictory advice, or are so vague (they will say something like "oh just cut leaves off carrots and store as is)

store as is? i need to know the detailed specifics. im a college student on a budget and i am sick and tired of buying vegetables and having to throw them out after a couple days or seeing all the color and flavor (Which means nutrient depletion) disappear!

i need to know how to store these vegetables, SPECIFICALLY, STEP BY STEP.

root vegetables (carrots, beets, etc) kale, collard greens/chard

i just cant afford this anymore, and i want to stay paleo but i literally cannot because my vegetables are going bad!!!

also, if your advice entails that i put anything in the vegetable crisper, do put it on low or high humidity ?

3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on January 09, 2013
at 04:43 PM

Also, when washing greens pick out colorless or bad looking ones. They will spoil the bunch. Same goes for any produce that you store.. one bad item can actually spoil the bunch. Thoroughness is key!

Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on January 09, 2013
at 07:04 AM

I live on a roughly 3 acre farm. Room for planting, yes

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on January 08, 2013
at 03:33 PM

jake, I live in washington DC in a townhome. I have two 10x2 beds where I grow lettuce (will be kale next year), zucchini, tomatoes, beets (will be carrots next year), green beans, and peppers. I also have two planters on my deck where I grow various herbs (green onions, basil, cilantro, parsley, rosemary, and thyme). And a hanging strawberry thing (didn't work out that well). You really do not need as much space as people think, probably not in an apartment, but you don't need to be in the middle of nowhere...

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 08, 2013
at 03:40 AM

The vase of herbs works well! It works well with leafy greens like kale and collards, too.

532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on January 08, 2013
at 12:08 AM

I put fresh herbs stem-down in a glass of water with a plastic Baggie over the top. I work in the produce dept. at the grocery store, and for out lettuces and celery (which are stored open-air, and so will go limp within a day or three), we will cut off the butt end, soak for five minutes in room-temp water, and return to cold storage for an hour, which gets them crispy again. But when I store veggies in the plastic container with paper towel, they don't go limp on me in the first place, so I never need to use moisture to crisp them.

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:53 PM

yeah but dont some vegetables need moisture?

A19808eb723793b6c0dc40c773d8e9bb

(215)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:01 PM

Oh and if anything goes horribly bad in the crisper that you thought would do well, cut it up and transfer to a jar. You can get canning jars at places like walmart or search thrift stores for some.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 07, 2013
at 07:17 PM

Click on the link. Look under your question body text for "edit|close|delete|flag". Click "delete".

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:16 PM

how do i delete that?

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:15 PM

i do, in the crisper, do i put it on low or high humidity ? i have it on the middle setting and they go bad within 48 hours, carrots become all flimsy and rubbery, dont understand. i buy organic produce from whole foods so i dont see what im doing wrong

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:14 PM

Please delete your exact duplicate question found here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/171581/how-do-you-store-vegetables-properly

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:13 PM

you must live in the middle of nowhere i live in the suburbs and i dont understand how having a garden would be possible with the room people have these days.

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13 Answers

4
0322015c4939fe66483d9af05079ad87

on January 07, 2013
at 08:28 PM

I was as desperate as you. I am afraid there are only two solutions:

  • eat your vegetables in 2-4 days
  • freeze it

Details:

  • Don't wash the vegetables in advance, just wash what you will eat/freeze. It lasts longer.
  • For freezing greens, refer to this website (and enjoy its Comic-Sans beauty): http://pickyourown.org/freezing_greens.htm
  • For smoothies, just chop your vegetables/fruits, bag and freeze
  • Be sure to always have some chopped garlic, parsley, carrot, celery and similar stuff in the freezer. (Glass jars are fine for that).

3
3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 07, 2013
at 07:47 PM

Bunches of herbs like parsley-- wash it, shake it dry, place it in a jar of water (just like a vase of flowers), it will last a long time like that, on the counter or in the fridge with a small plastic bag covering the top so it doesn't dry out. Really, the only time I have stuff getting dried out and going to waste in the fridge is if it is not stored in a container or bag. This is not rocket science here. Don't just throw produce in the fridge unenclosed. Don't let it sit there for days and days going bad-- use it up. If other stuff in the fridge is rotting, the mould is far more likely to spread, so keep a clean fridge.

What I find useful is, say you buy a bunch of chard, or a big leafy plant that takes up space and needs to be used up-- wash it, chop it, and store in ziplock bags or tupperware with a sheet of paper towel to get the moisture-- and it is ready to be tossed in whatever you are cooking. Convenient and lasts for a few days stored like that.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 08, 2013
at 03:40 AM

The vase of herbs works well! It works well with leafy greens like kale and collards, too.

2
3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on January 09, 2013
at 03:08 PM

It seems that there are very many different ways on here. While my way is not necessarily the only way.. it works for me. I live in Norway, the average temp in my house is 68F.. but I would say that it is abit colder in my kitchen due to no heater being in that room. In the summer, my kitchen might get a few degrees more.. but only on certain days.

Also, good advice was given saying to only shop enough for one week. Also, inspect things before putting them in the cart. Look for lack of color, soft spots, mold/wilting/slime/ect.

Potatoes (orange and white)- keep in dark cabinet, in large bowl. Mine come dirty, wash them just before using. (I have learned that if you store your potatoes in a dark place with apples on top of them that the apples ethylene gas will keep the potatoes fresh longer.)

Garlic & Onions - keep in cabinet. Once Onion is cut open, place in glass jar in fridge. Keep onions away from other produce - especially potaotes

Paprikas/Bell Peppers Keep on counter in their own bowl.

Carrots & Parsnips I have kept them in the fridge before, and that seemed to work fine. But I read that keeping them in a upright position keeps them fresh longe. So Supposed to be best to fill up a small container with sand and cram them in with some water (1T).

how-do-you-store-vegetables-properly-?????

Cucumbers in the fridge, I find any drawer works ok.

Spinach Take out of page, place in strainer and rinse with cold water. I then leave it on the counter to drain out some more water.. for like 10 minutes or so. Then with clean hands, gently pack it into a large glass airtight jar. Should have no problem lasting 1 week! You can do the same with other loose baby greens.

Lettuce This one is always tricky. I keep that in glass too when I can. But I have sometimes been buying the kind that has the small root pot attached and just leaving it in the drawer part of the fridge (my drawers are not high or low humidity.. they are just the same as the rest of the fridge imo, they is no seal on them so they are rather loose.)

Avocado I buy a few ripe, and a few non ripe. Keep them in their own bowl on the counter. See photo below, too Ripe means black and nasty inside..

how-do-you-store-vegetables-properly-?????

** Zucchini and Yellow Squash** Rinsed and in the fridge drawer.

Pumpkin or other hard squash Just like potatoes, in the cool dark cabinet work for me.

Beets Get their own bowl on the counter

** Citrus** Get their own bowl on the counter

Berries Rinsed and in bowl in frige, on the shelf

Other Fruit Most of my fruit I keep in a large bowl on my dinning table. Things like fresh dates get put in an airtight jar in the fridge.

ALSO, Eggs are very poreus and should be allowed to breath. Assuming you buy organic healthy eggs they should be stored on the counter. If there are some other veggies your eat normally, just say and I can be more specific.. just listing some popular ones.

3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on January 09, 2013
at 04:43 PM

Also, when washing greens pick out colorless or bad looking ones. They will spoil the bunch. Same goes for any produce that you store.. one bad item can actually spoil the bunch. Thoroughness is key!

2
532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:11 PM

I line a large plastic container with one or two dry paper towels. Then I put the veggies in and snap on an airtight lid. My vegetables stay fresh and CRISP for two weeks or more.

532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on January 08, 2013
at 12:08 AM

I put fresh herbs stem-down in a glass of water with a plastic Baggie over the top. I work in the produce dept. at the grocery store, and for out lettuces and celery (which are stored open-air, and so will go limp within a day or three), we will cut off the butt end, soak for five minutes in room-temp water, and return to cold storage for an hour, which gets them crispy again. But when I store veggies in the plastic container with paper towel, they don't go limp on me in the first place, so I never need to use moisture to crisp them.

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:53 PM

yeah but dont some vegetables need moisture?

2
A19808eb723793b6c0dc40c773d8e9bb

(215)

on January 07, 2013
at 10:59 PM

I had the exact same problem and it drove me CRAZY. All my spinach was slimy, broccoli was turning brown and yellow, it was awful.

Then came my saving grace!

At work, people like I'm crazy for how many glass jars I take home from there. Glass is the best thing to store veggie in EVER. I put spinach in a big pickle jar and it stays good for a month.

Specifications:

Collect large jars from where ever you can. Also you can buy glass containers but they don't work as well if they have plastic lids.

Don't clean your veggies prior to storage, but for things like broccoli and cauliflower, cut into pieces. Place either paper towel or a cloth on the bottom of the jar. Put veggie in, seal well. Simple as that. Things that I personally store in jars include: broccoli and cauliflower, snap peas, berries of any kind, spinach, lettuce, mushrooms, (bassicaly anything you think might wilt easy.)

Never ever let plastic go in your vegetable crisper. Everything will go bad faster. Line the bottom with paper towel or cloths and place things that don't wilt easily in whole. (such things include avocados, cabbage, potatoes of any kind, apples, zucchini, bell peppers, cucumber ect.)

I usually have my humidity in the middle since I have such a variation of fruits and veggies and with the cloth and no plastic, I rarely have a problem.

There you go! I hope this helps.

A19808eb723793b6c0dc40c773d8e9bb

(215)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:01 PM

Oh and if anything goes horribly bad in the crisper that you thought would do well, cut it up and transfer to a jar. You can get canning jars at places like walmart or search thrift stores for some.

2
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:16 PM

Nice list here, and there are many other good lists online. Totally disagree with Undercurrent above -- most veggies will last much longer than 4 days if stored properly. Beets & carrots can easily be kept for a week or even longer.

http://myplasticfreelife.com/2010/05/how-to-store-produce-without-plastic/

2
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on January 07, 2013
at 08:24 PM

First, don't buy more vegetables or fruit than you can consume in a week. Second, invest in a fridge thermometer and make sure that your fridge is running at the correct temp to keep your veggies fresh. Here is a guide for storing your produce optimally.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on January 07, 2013
at 07:32 PM

In the ground, pull and eat.

1
0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:14 PM

In a cool, dark place if unripe. In the fridge if ripe.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:09 PM

I'll go for the carrots. Wash them with cold water, remove dirt. Then place in a plastic bag and seal. Place in refrigerator. Will stay fresh for many days. I usually treat beets the same way.

Fresh greens are trickier. Still, I wash them lightly in cold water and as well place them in the refrig. I also seal these as well. last for days.

Mind you, I am talking about vegies plucked straight from my garden. YMMV with store bought.

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:13 PM

you must live in the middle of nowhere i live in the suburbs and i dont understand how having a garden would be possible with the room people have these days.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on January 08, 2013
at 03:33 PM

jake, I live in washington DC in a townhome. I have two 10x2 beds where I grow lettuce (will be kale next year), zucchini, tomatoes, beets (will be carrots next year), green beans, and peppers. I also have two planters on my deck where I grow various herbs (green onions, basil, cilantro, parsley, rosemary, and thyme). And a hanging strawberry thing (didn't work out that well). You really do not need as much space as people think, probably not in an apartment, but you don't need to be in the middle of nowhere...

Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on January 09, 2013
at 07:04 AM

I live on a roughly 3 acre farm. Room for planting, yes

0
5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:57 PM

just have a updated/second question here..

which vegetables do and dont like moisture when storing?

some people say to put wet paper towels over an open container for some vegetables, and then some people say to put vegetables in an airtight container with dry paper towels ?!

-3
383127951e2e17f23b584cd3842bb796

(835)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:13 PM

put them in the god damn refrigerator

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:15 PM

i do, in the crisper, do i put it on low or high humidity ? i have it on the middle setting and they go bad within 48 hours, carrots become all flimsy and rubbery, dont understand. i buy organic produce from whole foods so i dont see what im doing wrong

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