1

votes

How do I start a garden on my balcony?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 25, 2013 at 4:11 AM

Hi there,

I am currently living in an apartment with a decent sized walkable balcony that gets about 7 to 9 hours of direct sunlight a day. I want to start my own vegetable garden but I am not sure where to begin, I just want to keep it as simple as possible but I also want take full advantage of the space I have to grow my own food.

I have about 6 medium to large sized containers full of old plants at the moment which I am planning to dump out in order to re-use. My question is when I walk into Home Depot tomorrow, what is on my shopping list? And in your opinion what are some good veggies to grow for a limited spaced balcony, I really have no clue what foods are ideal for a garden. Any tips would be appreciated, Let the self-succiency begin!

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on May 25, 2013
at 08:07 AM

On second thought, you might be better off with some nice organic peat moss and a 50/50 perlite blend with good drainage holes on your pots. When mixing it up, don't breath in the glass particles. Hard to say. I'm into hydroponics, so, I have a slight bias toward that, but, it takes a while to get it working compared with dirt. Good luck!

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on May 25, 2013
at 08:01 AM

You might want to drop by reddit.com/r/gardening lots of helpful folks.

Medium avatar

(90)

on May 25, 2013
at 05:46 AM

Oh interesting, I will look into it! Thanks.

Medium avatar

(90)

on May 25, 2013
at 05:46 AM

Great! Thank you

Medium avatar

(90)

on May 25, 2013
at 05:44 AM

Sweetness! Thank you :)

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on May 25, 2013
at 04:51 AM

I'd start with some coco coir, a balanced organic NPK fertilizer, and heirloom variety seeds. When you water the plants, use chlorine-free water (tap water can be heavy on the chlorine if you don't leave it out.) I found swiss chard to be pretty easy to grow and cool looking.

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (90)
  • Views
    1.5K
  • Last Activity
    1430D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
46d2d71df39b4a6336df6d8307b25d87

(278)

on May 25, 2013
at 05:02 AM

I have some heirloom tomato plants coming to me in a week or so, and I've already bought a lettuce "garden" (planter with several lettuce varieties already growing) which has been hanging out in an area with mostly shade and seems to be doing well. My plan is to arrange the tomatoes in a full-sun area, and put the lettuces behind them (so the tomatoes will shelter the lettuces from direct sun). I'm not sure how they'll grow on my balcony, but I figure the worst case scenario is that it's a learning opportunity.

Based on what I've seen in a "normal" garden, carrots seem to be good for small spaces, and onions/garlic are apparently easy to grow. I'd also be interested in trying a little herb garden.

Medium avatar

(90)

on May 25, 2013
at 05:46 AM

Great! Thank you

1
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on May 25, 2013
at 05:57 AM

I would select herbs, for sure. Some basil, mint (which needs a pot, or it takes over everything) lemon balm, chives. These are nice to have, and a little goes a long way. I would do some strawberries. You don't say what your light is like. Also, what are the containers made of? I would worry about treated wood, which can leech chemicals, especially for root veggies. Chard and kale are tasty AND decorative. I am not crazy about tomatoes, but that's just because where I am it's very wet and they blight more often than not. A zucchini might do well in a large planter.

1
Ca4ab83e574f868f15c9ea206ab69680

on May 25, 2013
at 05:07 AM

I would start off with some good organic potting soil. The containers you choose to grow your plants in will make a huge difference as well. I really like these: http://www.smartpots.com/ With your limited space you may get a larger yield of vegetables with vertical gardening. You can grow anything in a container, but you should do some research. The larger the plant, the more container you will need to sustain a healthy plant. Nutrients will help, but again you will need to research as each plant type has different needs. Best of luck!

Medium avatar

(90)

on May 25, 2013
at 05:46 AM

Oh interesting, I will look into it! Thanks.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!