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Finding Paleo....Flavorless?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 20, 2010 at 5:42 AM

So I'm wondering if it's just my husband and myself needing to adjust our tastebuds, or if I'm doing something wrong when it comes to Paleo foods. It seems like no matter what I'm cooking, I'm finding it really unsatisfying to the taste buds.

With a little background, I really hate vegetables. They've never tasted good to me, I've always had to eat them with something else. The only ones I ever ate without a sneer have been corn, potatoes, beans....IE: the one's I can't eat now! I -LOVE- fruits, but I think I eat too much of them vs. veggies.

I've tried cooking up beef as a pot roast with mushrooms, onions and carrots with italian seasoning and fresh ground pepper. I've tried roasted chicken with mushrooms and onions and lemon. I've tried coconut milk curried chicken.

Now I should say that all the meat we can afford currently is not pastured, it's commercial, so I figure that may also be a factor. Our weekly budget is around 100$, and we seem to hit it every week just trying to buy produce and meat.

The only time I seem to enjoy food is when it's got a flavorful sauce...which means it's probably not paleo. I don't know how to recreate the flavors that pop without resorting to sugars and the like. I also like bacon and sausage, of course, but that can't be all I eat meatwise of course. I use coconut oil to fry up my meats, but they still feel one dimensional.

I come from a vegetarian background with a mother that didn't cook, so I can handle a lot of bland food, but it seems to really be affecting my husband. I don't want to just melt cheese over everything or salt it to death or resort to a pantry of canned frankensauces.

Has anyone else experienced this? Do you have any tips?

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 22, 2010
at 02:02 PM

I love the tip on freezing leftover wine! Except now I have no excuses to finish the bottle. :)

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on December 22, 2010
at 01:50 PM

Add salt, onions and whole pepper in the pot and you are good.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on December 21, 2010
at 03:00 PM

add salt to everything you cook. Sounds easy but many people coming off the SAD, when they cook for themselves at home have a serious fear of adding salt to their food. Adding good amounts of salt throughout the cooking process generally hightens all flavors rather than simple making something taste "salty."

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on December 21, 2010
at 02:52 PM

indeed awesome! parsnip and sweet potato pan-fried maybe even better?

9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on December 21, 2010
at 08:30 AM

I'm still working on getting down to a decent weight to start some heavier exercise, so I'm going as low carb as possible, no potatoes! And Patrik, thank you! I'll be looking through that blog in the morning to bookmark stuff 8D

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on December 21, 2010
at 06:11 AM

@Sigil --- happy to say that you are wrong! See FreeTheAnimal.com for amazing recipes and equally amazing Paleo sauces.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on December 21, 2010
at 02:47 AM

Why can't you eat potatoes?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on December 21, 2010
at 12:19 AM

We had parsnips pan-fried in lard the other night. Awesome!

Bc2110309df459e4fd6c8dab58e364ab

(1096)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:48 PM

Thanks, Ed! GREAT price.

473ccf0938761e73a3017356291c6eda

(55)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:46 PM

I agree with Karen. Buy whole spices in bulk from an Indian store and ground as needed. Really makes a difference and is far superior to the pre-ground stuff you pay through the nose for. A big mortar and pestle is also essential in any kitchen.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:45 PM

@jenna, check out Nutiva Extra Virgin Coconut Oil at VitaminShoppe.com -- http://www.vitaminshoppe.com/store/en/browse/sku_detail.jsp?id=YR-1008 (free shipping on orders over US$100)

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 20, 2010
at 10:18 PM

Browning a roast in bacon grease before slow cooking is one of my stand-by roast methods.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 20, 2010
at 10:14 PM

I need to make a roast tonight for my husband's work Christmas pot luck tomorrow and your tips will most definitely come of use. :)

Bc2110309df459e4fd6c8dab58e364ab

(1096)

on December 20, 2010
at 07:43 PM

My kids eat bacon every single morning, so i just keep the grease and use it for cooking dinner. i have a receptacle next to my stove as well! Coconut oil is SO expensive. I treat it like liquid gold. haha

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:27 PM

i thought i was the only one doing this, lol. my coconut oil hasn't been getting much love lately because i've been using bacon grease almost exclusively... problem is that i run out of it so quick. i laughed the other day because, like my grandmother used to 30 years ago, i now have a bacon grease receptacle on my stovetop.

9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on December 20, 2010
at 04:45 PM

Thank you very very much! That's something I will definitely try soon! I seem to be able to palate veggies a lot better when they're in some sort of medley and cooked down.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on December 20, 2010
at 12:22 PM

Nothing wrong with sauces per se. You might have to make your own to avoid the heavy sugar etc in most commercial sauces. Keep extra seasonings like lemon, vinegar, tabasco, herb blends on the table.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on December 20, 2010
at 12:18 PM

While the spices can last a few years, they begin to lose flavor after 6 months to a year tops. I find buying spices in bulk (very small bulk) at Indian and other ethnic grocers gets me both best quality and cheapest prices. I find most American geared recipes very light (even now) on seasoning and usually up the measurements a good bit to taste.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:56 AM

Ground up dried spices last for a couple years. But you don't always know how long they've been sitting around before you buy them. General rule of thumb my mom taught me for the ground up dried herbs and spices was shake and sniff. If it doesn't smell like it should (no smell, weak smell), toss it. This, of course, assumes you know what it should smell like, so take a sniff when you buy the bottle. :)

9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:12 AM

I use a ton of spices when I cook, maybe they're just old? I was really surprised when I didn't care for the roasted meats, they're normally my favorites!

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21 Answers

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12
C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on December 20, 2010
at 03:54 PM

What are your cooking methods? Different methods can go a long way towards adding flavor.

For instance, pot roast. It is quite easy to just throw a roast in a pot with some seasonings, veggies, and liquid and cook it, but it will be very lackluster if you do it that way. To make a flavorful roast I would first marinate it overnight in a mixture of herbs/spices/salt (parsley, garlic, crushed bay leaves, juniper berries, and pepper is nice - moisten it with a spoonful of oil or fat and rub it over the roast) and finely chopped veggies (carrots, onions or leeks, celery). The next day, heat some fat in a large pot and sear the roast on all sides until it looks nice and brown and there's brown stuff (called fond) on the bottom of the pot. Remove the roast, add the marinade veggies and cook until they begin to brown as well, scraping up the fond from the pot bottom as the veggies exude some water - this equals tons of flavor. If the brown stuff won't start dissolving, add in a splash of water to help it along once the veggies have browned. Then push the veggies up against the wall of the pot, add some extra veggies if you like (mushrooms or potatoes are good) put the roast in the center, and pour in enough water to come halfway up the meat. Bring to a simmer, cover, lower the heat and cook for several hours until it's tender. When the meat is done, remove the veggies and meat from the pot and boil the sauce down a little bit if it's very watery, then thicken it a little, either with arrowroot powder or by pureeing some of the veggies and adding them back in.

Basically any time you can saute something, do it until it gets brown and then deglaze the fond off the bottom of the pan with something (stock, water, wine) and you will get a ton more flavor and extra sauce to boot. Like, cook pork chops in a pan in bacon grease with some salt and pepper, then deglaze the pan with some chicken stock and whisk in some butter and you have a tasty pan sauce to pour over the chops.

Also you haven't mentioned salt. I always use sea salt to taste and it will really go a long way towards making your food yummier.

9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on December 20, 2010
at 04:45 PM

Thank you very very much! That's something I will definitely try soon! I seem to be able to palate veggies a lot better when they're in some sort of medley and cooked down.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 20, 2010
at 10:14 PM

I need to make a roast tonight for my husband's work Christmas pot luck tomorrow and your tips will most definitely come of use. :)

3
03f8e74520b0a79c6ce1501524509ac2

on December 21, 2010
at 12:02 AM

You can roast just about any vegetable with salt, garlic and olive oil (or whatever fat you're using) and it'll come out with a really rich flavor. My husband grew up with canned or boiled veggies, so usually thought eating vegetables as a bland, soft chore. I turned him around once we started roasting.

Crank up your oven to 450 and let it roast till brown. Depending on the vegetable and how large you cut them up, it could be 10 - 30 minutes. For example, asparagus probably takes about 10 minutes while cauliflower (with curry powder!) takes closer to 20.

3
Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:10 AM

garlic, onion, cumin, ginger, cayenne, turmeric, paprika, basil, oregano, thyme, rosemary, mint, vinegar, lemon juice/zest, orange juice/zest - experiment!

9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:12 AM

I use a ton of spices when I cook, maybe they're just old? I was really surprised when I didn't care for the roasted meats, they're normally my favorites!

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on December 20, 2010
at 12:22 PM

Nothing wrong with sauces per se. You might have to make your own to avoid the heavy sugar etc in most commercial sauces. Keep extra seasonings like lemon, vinegar, tabasco, herb blends on the table.

473ccf0938761e73a3017356291c6eda

(55)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:46 PM

I agree with Karen. Buy whole spices in bulk from an Indian store and ground as needed. Really makes a difference and is far superior to the pre-ground stuff you pay through the nose for. A big mortar and pestle is also essential in any kitchen.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on December 20, 2010
at 12:18 PM

While the spices can last a few years, they begin to lose flavor after 6 months to a year tops. I find buying spices in bulk (very small bulk) at Indian and other ethnic grocers gets me both best quality and cheapest prices. I find most American geared recipes very light (even now) on seasoning and usually up the measurements a good bit to taste.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:56 AM

Ground up dried spices last for a couple years. But you don't always know how long they've been sitting around before you buy them. General rule of thumb my mom taught me for the ground up dried herbs and spices was shake and sniff. If it doesn't smell like it should (no smell, weak smell), toss it. This, of course, assumes you know what it should smell like, so take a sniff when you buy the bottle. :)

2
F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on December 22, 2010
at 01:49 PM

One tip for seasoning with salt and pepper. Make sure that you season often during the whole cooking process. I used to always just season early and late in the process, but now that I'm seasoning just a bit every time I add an ingredient to a stew, or every time I check on the doneness of my roast, the taste is much more subtle and rich.

Don't forget the pepper, the king of spices. Pepper has a very recognizable taste if you just add lots at the end, but it really enhances flavours if you use it as I describe above.

Flavour enhancers that I use a lot, these are mostly non-paleo, but are used in small amounts except for the tomatoes:

  • Tomatoes are a great natural flavour enhancer, so if you are eating nightshades, use lots of tomatoes, added as early as is feasible.
  • A bit of wine goes a long way. I freeze leftover wine in ice cube bags.
  • Make stock from everything you can think of, freeze it and use it instead of water.
  • A teaspoon of honey or maple syrup does wonders.
  • Star anise is magic for pot roast and a miracle for pork marinades. It can be overpowering, so be careful. I often just use a single arm for a stew.
  • A tiny bit of Worcestershire sauce or soy sauce or HP sauce, some nice fermented sauce.
  • Fish sauce! I don't just use it in Thai food any more. I use it in my marinara and Bolognese.
  • Cumin, cinnamon, cardamom, cloves. These spice make everything more meaty, and by varying the amounts of each you can go more Indian, more medieval England, more Arabian. Use in moderation as with the star anise.
  • Citrus fruit and/or zest.

Also, you should try ethnic food. Vietnamese and Thai food is really good, even without the traditional starches and sugar. Do a great taco with pulled pork, wrapped in lettuce. Ghanaian stews are amazing, palm oil makes everything awesome. I often make Indian curries with lambs hearts, they are great as well. Kebab, without the pita, with some nice harissa and yoghurt sauce.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 22, 2010
at 02:02 PM

I love the tip on freezing leftover wine! Except now I have no excuses to finish the bottle. :)

2
8632c87a833f1d30f5fa8d4768d10c45

on December 21, 2010
at 02:02 PM

Also, if you're into roasting a whole chicken, or turkey, brining it for a few hours before hand makes for the tastiest, juiciest bird ever. Add aromatic herbs to be brine, whichever ones you enjoy... I even add orange peel.

2
Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:46 PM

This is an example of something I made this morning using many of the suggestions above - bacon, spices and herbs.

Ingredients
2 large & thick slices bacon (OK to use more)
1 onion
1 lb ground buffalo
few cloves garlic, minced
chipotle powder
dried sage
fresh rosemary (dried OK too, but I have a rosemary bush outside)
salt
1 yam, roasted in oven

Cooked bacon in the oven, then used grease to brown the minced onion. Then added buffalo and browned that. When close to done, crumbled the bacon, added the garlic with a generous amount of chipotle powder, herbs and a little salt. Stirred it around and added a splash of water to distribute the chipotle powder. When meat fully cooked, sliced the roasted yam and added that to the meat.

Result was spicy, smoky (from chipotle and bacon), salty, plus the added flavor of herbs and browned onion; and sweet from the yam. Delicious! And not so hard to do.

Point is that just browned buffalo (or ground beef) might have been boring but with a few more simple ingredients and extra effort it can be really good.

Additional comments - definitely learn to brown then braise; and I really like chimichurri too.

2
Bc2110309df459e4fd6c8dab58e364ab

(1096)

on December 20, 2010
at 01:18 PM

If you are opposed to using salt (i am not, i just use it sparingly now) you can use bacon and or bacon grease to flavor up just about any meat! You can brush it onto chicken before broiling or baking, it will give the skin a salty crispy texture. You can add a piece or two to a skillet, let it brown, remove it and pan fry a rib eye in there and will get the same salty crispy result. Same goes for most veggies! Just crumble the bacon back up and add it to your greens at the very end. I use bacon as my "oil" to season and cook all the time. I love the flavor it lends.

Bc2110309df459e4fd6c8dab58e364ab

(1096)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:48 PM

Thanks, Ed! GREAT price.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:27 PM

i thought i was the only one doing this, lol. my coconut oil hasn't been getting much love lately because i've been using bacon grease almost exclusively... problem is that i run out of it so quick. i laughed the other day because, like my grandmother used to 30 years ago, i now have a bacon grease receptacle on my stovetop.

Bc2110309df459e4fd6c8dab58e364ab

(1096)

on December 20, 2010
at 07:43 PM

My kids eat bacon every single morning, so i just keep the grease and use it for cooking dinner. i have a receptacle next to my stove as well! Coconut oil is SO expensive. I treat it like liquid gold. haha

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 20, 2010
at 10:18 PM

Browning a roast in bacon grease before slow cooking is one of my stand-by roast methods.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:45 PM

@jenna, check out Nutiva Extra Virgin Coconut Oil at VitaminShoppe.com -- http://www.vitaminshoppe.com/store/en/browse/sku_detail.jsp?id=YR-1008 (free shipping on orders over US$100)

2
07c86972a3bea0b0dc17752e9d2f5642

on December 20, 2010
at 01:04 PM

Try watching cooking shows or reading recipes for flavor combo inspiration and to learn techniques like deglazing and reducing for au jus, braising, how chefs season and roast or grill meat, etc. I'm not talking about begin a slave to recipes - I never follow them. No one has to be a chef or have a recipe to be able to cook, but I think we've lost a lot of knowledge of cooking technique in the past couple of generations that we can learn again from shows and cookbooks. I know I have and my taste buds are happy at last.

2
8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on December 20, 2010
at 06:29 AM

You don't HAVE to eat a lot of vegetables (nutritionists all over the world would be gasping in horror at that sentence, but I believe it's true.) Eat lots of fruit. Really, you can. A paleo diet doesn't have to be low-carb. Eating too much fruit is unlikely. They have fiber and water content (And the sheer bulk of the food) which makes over-eating them hard.

I share your preference of fruits over vegetables. I mean, I like raw carrots because they can be sweet like fruit but I don't much care for anything else.

Also, tubers like potatoes aren't really forbidden. It's not Neolithic, and it is part of many hunter-gatherer diets. I like potatoes too. I actually like them better than sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes don't go well with anything, but potatoes are very versatile and lend their texture well to a variety of condiments.

2
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on December 20, 2010
at 05:53 AM

Tabasco sauce, herbs, spices. If you've got one of the multi-pack herb/spice boxes from Costco or the like, and it's more than a couple years old, toss it. The fresher the better.

1
8ce2e69af79dcb1488f776efc1c54052

on December 21, 2010
at 12:30 PM

The foundations of flavor are salt, pepper and vinegar. Tabasco sauce has all three and a little does go a long way. I didn't see that you were using any salt. We use Himalayan salt. You might also try smashing garlic cloves and inserting them (poke a slit with a small knife) into your roast next time you make it.

1
03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

on December 20, 2010
at 10:40 PM

Non-calorie sweeteners don't have a lot of support in the paleo community, but I found them (and salt) to be extremely helpful especially when in the transition stage. The problem with pre-made sauces/mixes is that there's no happy medium. You either get the full on HFCS/salt stuff, or full on fake-sweet. But if you cook everything from scratch, you can regulate the amount of sweetener that you use and gradually reduce that.

I use a high quality liquid stevia or erythritol in some cooking, like in a thai curry, or a bbq pork, where a bit of sweetness really brings out the flavour. You can ratchet that amount down over time. I find thai takeout way too sweet now, for example, but I would definitely have gone "bleh" at sugar/sweetener-less foods at the beginning.

Now I'm at the point where 85-90% dark chocolate is just about right and a normal "dark chocolate" tastes like pure sugar to me.

Ditto with cranking down the salt a bit over time.

1
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 20, 2010
at 10:25 PM

Curry and wasabi are two palate-awakeners for me. I love asparagus coated in salted butter and powdered wasabi (Japanese horseradish) and grilled or pan-sauteed at high heat until tender-crisp.

Curry is great for sprinkling on butter-glazed root veggies and tubers just before slow roasting, also when combined with coconut milk or coconut oil. Garam masala is a curry blend with chai-esque spices that is delicious on almost anything, but especially in the butter-glazed (or coconut oil glazed) veggie roasting just mentioned.

Also try a chimichurri sauce on your beef.

1
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on December 20, 2010
at 09:47 PM

Add fat to everything: olive oil (when cold) or lard or coconut oil.

Also, try different veggies: parsnips, turnips, beets. Try making french fried root veggies. This will get you in the right direction. ;)

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on December 21, 2010
at 12:19 AM

We had parsnips pan-fried in lard the other night. Awesome!

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on December 21, 2010
at 02:52 PM

indeed awesome! parsnip and sweet potato pan-fried maybe even better?

1
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on December 20, 2010
at 07:29 PM

I would recommend Julia Child's cookbook. She has a lot of great sauces (hollandaise is a favorite). You can also learn a lot of cooking techniques for meat/eggs/veggies to make them taste good. I had to learn how to cook when I started paleo, and it took a lot of experimentation and a lot of bad meals. I literally could not boil water, but now I cook every day.

0
Cb0497fda609684b23466e727775eff5

on December 21, 2010
at 07:56 PM

I'm no chef but it sounds like you need to experiment with sauces on your own. You can make some delicious gravies and sauces using the drippings from meat or the leftover grease when cooking. This is something even my non-paleo mom does. Granted, she adds corn starch but I'm sure there's a paleo-friendly substitute for corn starch...maybe bone meal? Experiment and think outside the box and remember that in a paleo diet the flavor is in the fat. So pile it on. Make sauces, gravies and creams out of fat and use lots of herbs and spices. I'm sure you will be able to come up with something rich, tasty and nutritious! Maybe you can post your recipe sometime!

0
741862d51f4709ea726113db7926576f

(605)

on December 21, 2010
at 07:44 PM

Sigil: my suggestion is to find what you like and give yourself some room to try things and see how it goes!

For example, do you like tomato sauce (like what is used for spaghetti?)? Chances are, you do (maybe not though?). Tomato sauce is a great way to sneak in a ton of veggies (zucchini, squash, etc.) without much of a veggie taste. Just be sure to use fresh garlic in the sauce, and get a good can of tomatoes. Once you have your tomato sauce recipe established how you like it, use it in a ton of different ways! Saute' up broccoli and cover it in tomato sauce, serve it with your chicken.

If you are still trying to lean out, I'd say really limit the fruit. Very difficult to lean out with lots of fruit.

Make sauces your friend for all kinds of stuff. It's easy to OD or just become really bored with salads - especially if you don't like veggies. Opt for more flavorful options - a stir fry with loads of ginger and garlic (and tamari as your soy sauce), I know people whose lives have been transformed with veggies once they tried oven roasting them with garlic and olive oil (cauliflower, broccoli, brussels sprouts).

Find what you like - experiment to find new things you might like - maybe even take a cooking class to learn a particular style of cooking that you like (Italian, Chinese, Thai, Mexican) and then adapt it in your paleo way. For me, sauces have been my bff in going paleo (my chimichurri or adobo or "peanut-less" sauces go on just about everything! - feel free to hit me up for recipes!)

I have a friend who is a very picky eater, and had to eat ketchup on everything just to get into paleo. It wasn't perfect paleo, but it was a start!

0
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on December 21, 2010
at 02:55 PM

Fat, besides adding some flavor, brings out the flavor of the ingredients! Especially the sweet flavor.

Also, tastebuds, or better, the central nervous system, really seems to adapt. Things that were once to bitter or sour, now are just sweet enough for me.

0
485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

on December 21, 2010
at 05:33 AM

If you ever have steaks (whether beef, lamb or pork) or chicken parts, try broiling them. It's faster and it imparts a delicious flavor that I find lacking in roasting or frying.

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on December 22, 2010
at 01:50 PM

Add salt, onions and whole pepper in the pot and you are good.

0
8632c87a833f1d30f5fa8d4768d10c45

on December 20, 2010
at 09:00 PM

Try, coarse sea salt... the right amount of seasoning is key.

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