6

votes

Does everyone here eat SOME raw food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 27, 2011 at 12:33 PM

I have just become aware of how little raw food I eat. Some berries, perhaps an apple and (rarely) a banana. Some sauekraut. And little bits of salad as garnish with first courses.

But almost everything else is cooked. I have a root veg soup cooking now in lamb stock (for lunch), and some beetroots roasting in the oven for later, with grilled pork steaks.

Is raw food beneficial, and should I be trying to eat more raw? Are there beneficial bacteria - or, as Sally Fallon mentions in Nourishing Traditions, helpful enzymes, which cooking kills? Or does cooking make minerals etc MORE available?

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 11, 2011
at 08:44 PM

bugs bunny, anyone? I love my raw carrots

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 31, 2011
at 12:44 PM

So yeah, sauerkraut AIN'T raw.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 31, 2011
at 12:44 PM

From Meriam Webster:
: not cooked 2
a (1) : being in or nearly in the natural state : not processed or purified (2) : not diluted or blended

7b7ebe08c25d5a911f9c15c5e50092b9

(337)

on October 28, 2011
at 10:19 PM

Fermenting something doesn't make it not raw -- cooking makes it not raw. Homemade sauerkraut is definitely a raw food. Standard store-bought sauerkraut, on the other hand, is typically pasteurized and not raw.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 28, 2011
at 08:05 PM

No arguing that affine. Just pointing out that fermented foods are not raw.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 28, 2011
at 07:11 AM

Thanks! I'll add in raw fruit. And I do like celery - but if I eat it after lunch I seem to be up peeing half the night...

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 27, 2011
at 10:23 PM

First, it's likely our ancestors ate fresh/raw vegetables and fruits so it can't hurt. Second, if I have to give up grains and sweeteners I think I deserve celery and fruit.

0a0c8c37d3a56738dc017e4ff09f21ee

(480)

on October 27, 2011
at 08:43 PM

Fermented foods are amazingly nutritious and good. They promote bacterial health in your digestive tract, which from what I have read about are at least partially responsible for weight control and all-around health. Artificial sugars kill them in half a second, but fermented foods (and yogurt, I guess) replenish them!

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 27, 2011
at 08:21 PM

I'm having flashbacks to my teen years, lol.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 27, 2011
at 07:17 PM

So, if traditional societies jump off a bridge... Oh, just kidding. I lurvs da sushi!

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:48 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked it, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am also not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food-- and, I know of no healthy group that did.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:48 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked it, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food. And, I know of no healthy group that did

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:47 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked ir, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food. And, I know of no healthy group that did

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:47 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked them, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food. And, I know of no healthy group that did.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:17 PM

Sorry cliff, but if you can not produce one society who thrived on ONLY cooked food then the burden of proof lies with you.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:16 PM

Sorry cliff, but if you cant name one society whose entire diet consist of ONLY raw food I think the burden of evidence lies with you.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:01 PM

provide evidence that you'll be less healthy if you don't eat raw food

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:29 PM

And, when I say "can" I meant, is it more optimal to include some raw foods or can we be every bit as healthy on a 100% cooked diet. I stand by my point that we should include some raw food out of caution. That may be fruit and salad greens. If you think that's fanciful, you are nuts.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:10 PM

You guys are illogical nitwits. The question asked if SOME raw foods are required and that's the question I answered. If you think that humans can be healthy eating zero raw foods, please provide your evidence. Otherwise, please stop writing stupid shit.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:09 PM

You guys are illogical retards. The question asked if SOME raw foods are required and that's the question I answered. If you think that humans can be healthy eating zero raw foods, please provide your evidence. Otherwise, shut the $#%# up.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:15 PM

The adoption of cooking can also be expected to have had far-reaching effects on such aspects of human biology as life-history, social behavior, and evolutionary psychology. Since dietary adaptations are central to understanding species evolution, cooking appears to have been a key feature of the environment of human evolutionary adaptedness. Further investigation is therefore needed of the ways in which human digestive physiology is constrained by the need for food of relatively high caloric density compared to other great apes.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:15 PM

Cooking has been practiced for ample time to allow the evolution of such adaptations. Digestive adaptations have not been investigated in detail but may include small teeth, small hind-guts, large small intestines, a fast gut passage rate, and possibly reduced ability to detoxify.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:14 PM

In particular, many plant foods are too fiber-rich when raw, while most raw meat appears too tough to allow easy chewing. If cooking is indeed obligatory for humans but not for other apes, this means that human biology must have adapted to the ingestion of cooked food (i.e. food that is tender and low in fiber) in ways that no longer allow efficient processing of raw foods.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:13 PM

No human foragers have been recorded as living without cooking, and people who choose a ‘raw-foodist’ life-style experience low energy and impaired reproductive function. This suggests that cooking may be obligatory for humans. The possibility that cooking is obligatory is supported by calculations suggesting that a diet of raw food could not supply sufficient calories for a normal hunter–gatherer lifestyle.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:12 PM

I would recommendthe article written by Professor Richard Wrangham at the Department of Anthropology, Harvard University 'Cooking as a biological trait' in support of Cliff an abstract of which follows:

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 02:39 PM

I think both Kasra and Cliff need to recognize the question asked about SOME raw food. You both seem to be pointing out flaws of a 100% raw food diet. You can not argue that nutritional bio-availability is not changed by cooking....it is. It is NOT ALWAYS detrimental OR helpful...it just is, and in that case why not utilize both for maximum effect? All right, I shall retire now to fantasy land were people eat both raw and cooked good..GASP!

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:58 PM

I'm with cliff. The whole raw food issue reeks of reenactment and anti-science.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:55 PM

both you guys live in fantasy land

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:44 PM

This Jay agrees with the cautionary principle too, though 50-50 seems excessive and difficult to do. I try to ensure some raw food every day. As for enzymes, I read on a raw food blog that the denatured enzymes can become active again in the small intestine where the ph is higher. I nver looked into it and don't know if it's true or if it even matters. One thing often overlooked by raw foodist is that cooked protein places lower demands on the body's own enzymes, with the result that the net effect may be enzyme-sparing. Again, I've not verified these claims myself.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:35 PM

If there is an instance of some society living well on only cooked food that I haven't heard of I'm sure you or someone else can point it out. Maybe you and I both should replace the "we" in our sentences with the word "I" then to recognize we do not speak to all the knowledge collected by all of mankind?

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:03 PM

I'm sure you have studied all the healthy people of the world jay....

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 12:57 PM

"as far as we know"....and since we don't know of any healthy peoples who are purported to eat only cooked food I would keep it 50/50, cause what we know pales in comparison of what we don't know.

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13 Answers

5
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:01 PM

Sauerkraut is not raw, it is fermented, there is a difference. It's kind of like having your food cooked by bacteria.

I think that cooking foods properly can degrade a lot of the anti-nutrients (depending on the method, I read about undercooking beans actually increasing certain anti-nutrients).

7b7ebe08c25d5a911f9c15c5e50092b9

(337)

on October 28, 2011
at 10:19 PM

Fermenting something doesn't make it not raw -- cooking makes it not raw. Homemade sauerkraut is definitely a raw food. Standard store-bought sauerkraut, on the other hand, is typically pasteurized and not raw.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 28, 2011
at 08:05 PM

No arguing that affine. Just pointing out that fermented foods are not raw.

0a0c8c37d3a56738dc017e4ff09f21ee

(480)

on October 27, 2011
at 08:43 PM

Fermented foods are amazingly nutritious and good. They promote bacterial health in your digestive tract, which from what I have read about are at least partially responsible for weight control and all-around health. Artificial sugars kill them in half a second, but fermented foods (and yogurt, I guess) replenish them!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 31, 2011
at 12:44 PM

From Meriam Webster:
: not cooked 2
a (1) : being in or nearly in the natural state : not processed or purified (2) : not diluted or blended

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 31, 2011
at 12:44 PM

So yeah, sauerkraut AIN'T raw.

4
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:02 PM

Traditional societies ate raw foods, so I make sure to include some in my diet. I eat virtually all my fruits raw, plus some of my veggies (usually in some kind of salad). I also eat raw fish (sashimi/sushi/ceviche), and rare beef.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 27, 2011
at 08:21 PM

I'm having flashbacks to my teen years, lol.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 27, 2011
at 07:17 PM

So, if traditional societies jump off a bridge... Oh, just kidding. I lurvs da sushi!

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 11, 2011
at 08:44 PM

bugs bunny, anyone? I love my raw carrots

4
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 12:51 PM

Enzymes are killed by your stomach acid. We have no biological need for raw food as far as we know.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 12:57 PM

"as far as we know"....and since we don't know of any healthy peoples who are purported to eat only cooked food I would keep it 50/50, cause what we know pales in comparison of what we don't know.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:10 PM

You guys are illogical nitwits. The question asked if SOME raw foods are required and that's the question I answered. If you think that humans can be healthy eating zero raw foods, please provide your evidence. Otherwise, please stop writing stupid shit.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:16 PM

Sorry cliff, but if you cant name one society whose entire diet consist of ONLY raw food I think the burden of evidence lies with you.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:55 PM

both you guys live in fantasy land

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:58 PM

I'm with cliff. The whole raw food issue reeks of reenactment and anti-science.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:15 PM

Cooking has been practiced for ample time to allow the evolution of such adaptations. Digestive adaptations have not been investigated in detail but may include small teeth, small hind-guts, large small intestines, a fast gut passage rate, and possibly reduced ability to detoxify.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:44 PM

This Jay agrees with the cautionary principle too, though 50-50 seems excessive and difficult to do. I try to ensure some raw food every day. As for enzymes, I read on a raw food blog that the denatured enzymes can become active again in the small intestine where the ph is higher. I nver looked into it and don't know if it's true or if it even matters. One thing often overlooked by raw foodist is that cooked protein places lower demands on the body's own enzymes, with the result that the net effect may be enzyme-sparing. Again, I've not verified these claims myself.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:09 PM

You guys are illogical retards. The question asked if SOME raw foods are required and that's the question I answered. If you think that humans can be healthy eating zero raw foods, please provide your evidence. Otherwise, shut the $#%# up.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:48 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked it, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food. And, I know of no healthy group that did

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:12 PM

I would recommendthe article written by Professor Richard Wrangham at the Department of Anthropology, Harvard University 'Cooking as a biological trait' in support of Cliff an abstract of which follows:

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:01 PM

provide evidence that you'll be less healthy if you don't eat raw food

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:35 PM

If there is an instance of some society living well on only cooked food that I haven't heard of I'm sure you or someone else can point it out. Maybe you and I both should replace the "we" in our sentences with the word "I" then to recognize we do not speak to all the knowledge collected by all of mankind?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 02:39 PM

I think both Kasra and Cliff need to recognize the question asked about SOME raw food. You both seem to be pointing out flaws of a 100% raw food diet. You can not argue that nutritional bio-availability is not changed by cooking....it is. It is NOT ALWAYS detrimental OR helpful...it just is, and in that case why not utilize both for maximum effect? All right, I shall retire now to fantasy land were people eat both raw and cooked good..GASP!

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:48 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked it, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am also not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food-- and, I know of no healthy group that did.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:17 PM

Sorry cliff, but if you can not produce one society who thrived on ONLY cooked food then the burden of proof lies with you.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:03 PM

I'm sure you have studied all the healthy people of the world jay....

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:15 PM

The adoption of cooking can also be expected to have had far-reaching effects on such aspects of human biology as life-history, social behavior, and evolutionary psychology. Since dietary adaptations are central to understanding species evolution, cooking appears to have been a key feature of the environment of human evolutionary adaptedness. Further investigation is therefore needed of the ways in which human digestive physiology is constrained by the need for food of relatively high caloric density compared to other great apes.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:13 PM

No human foragers have been recorded as living without cooking, and people who choose a ‘raw-foodist’ life-style experience low energy and impaired reproductive function. This suggests that cooking may be obligatory for humans. The possibility that cooking is obligatory is supported by calculations suggesting that a diet of raw food could not supply sufficient calories for a normal hunter–gatherer lifestyle.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:29 PM

And, when I say "can" I meant, is it more optimal to include some raw foods or can we be every bit as healthy on a 100% cooked diet. I stand by my point that we should include some raw food out of caution. That may be fruit and salad greens. If you think that's fanciful, you are nuts.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on October 27, 2011
at 03:14 PM

In particular, many plant foods are too fiber-rich when raw, while most raw meat appears too tough to allow easy chewing. If cooking is indeed obligatory for humans but not for other apes, this means that human biology must have adapted to the ingestion of cooked food (i.e. food that is tender and low in fiber) in ways that no longer allow efficient processing of raw foods.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:47 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked them, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food. And, I know of no healthy group that did.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:47 PM

There is a lot we don't know about nutrition - in fact, much more than we do know. There are things that happen to food when you cooked ir, including enzyme destruction, polyphenol degradation, chlorophyll destruction, vitamin depletion, protein denaturation, etc. I am aware of evidence that we need cooked food to thrive. I am not aware of any evidence that can thrive without any raw food. And, I know of no healthy group that did

2
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on October 28, 2011
at 02:34 PM

I eat a raw pastured egg yolk or two a day, once or twice a week I eat some raw grassfed beef and liver, I occasionally have some raw cheese or cultured raw milk (like yogurt or kefir,) and I eat a Sissonesque " bigass" salad for lunch every day. Often the raw egg yolk goes on top of that.

I crave raw animal products like mad and I'm breastfeeding so I imagine there's something to that craving. Obviously raw is more bland so I don't think it's a food reward issue. I craved raw meat when I was a kid too which is kinda gross since my parents bought about half conventional half organic, but I'd sneak raw meat out of the fridge when I was a preteen (prior to my vegetarian stint in high school.) I doubt that strong of a craving at 10 years old wasn't biologically based, but I could be wrong. I'd love to see some data.

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 27, 2011
at 02:30 PM

To go beyond my comment to cliff. It has been shown that within the very same food different aspects are more bio-available raw than cooked and vice-versa. This allows us to get more nutritional variety from the same number of food sources just by altering the ways in which they are prepared.

How in the word is that a bad thing? I would recommend mixing the two. There is just no scientific or logical reason you wouldn't.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on October 27, 2011
at 01:21 PM

I usually eat a large raw vegetable salad in the evening, veggies from the garden.

I will also eat steamed veggies. Or sauteed in an omelet.

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on October 27, 2011
at 12:36 PM

I eat a raw beef mishmosh. I eat both raw and cooked veggies. Raw veggies for me more than likely come in the form of a salad.

0
7b11ed525ffa23bc7257684e27488a6a

(366)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:00 PM

I eat 1/3 -3/4 of my foods raw. And that includes animal foods, which are the mainstay of my paleo diet. Weston Price found that the traditional cultures he visited (about 12 regions) all ate some of their animal foods raw. Also, I feel best having a good portion of my foods raw. Carpaccio of muscle or organ meat, sashimi, steak tartare, salads, some fruits and herbs are the main foods I eat raw. I consider fermented foods like pickled herring and kraut to be raw, and I include those in my repertoire as well.

0
64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:52 PM

Cheetos are raw.

0
38fca13acabddf7b9c54098507e4041a

on October 28, 2011
at 12:00 AM

I eat some raw celery daily and am trying to get back to salads. However I agree raw foods aren't the miracle people make them out to be. OTOH I'm pretty sure underground fitness/nutrition guru Anthony Bova puts an emphasis on raw. I ate about 50% raw in my 20s and liked it. Yet really once you get away from fruits there are few raw veggies you can really eat a lot of besides salad and celery. Bova believes raw fruit is really key.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 28, 2011
at 07:11 AM

Thanks! I'll add in raw fruit. And I do like celery - but if I eat it after lunch I seem to be up peeing half the night...

0
Medium avatar

(1240)

on October 27, 2011
at 10:16 PM

I eat a big salad a few times every week. I also make smoothies with frozen berries and baby spinach sometimes. Today I put a raw egg in a smoothie with pureed butternut squash, almond milk (unswtnd), coconut milk, vanilla extract, and pumpkin pie spices. It was delicious! I made a few raw soups this summer and really enjoyed the variety it lent to my diet.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 27, 2011
at 08:38 PM

Raw cabbage. Raw onions. But the oysters get fried and the buttercup squash and finn potatoes get baked.

It's what's for dinner these cold days.

Advantage goes to cooking for sanitation. e coli and hepatitis are best eaten dead and denatured.

0
6498694060d879a7960b35913539b75f

(1307)

on October 27, 2011
at 08:28 PM

I put baby spinach leaves and egg yolks in my morning smoothie. I guess that's about as raw as I get. Oh, and I used to love these raw nuts (rosemary garlic pistachios) from Whole Foods, but last week I couldn't find them. :-( Besides the occasional salad, that's pretty much it.

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