4

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Do you produce some of your own food? Do you hunt/gather any of your food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 05, 2012 at 3:55 PM

Do you garden or raise some of your own animal food? What do you grow or raise? How much of your diet does it account for?

Also - do you gather, hunt or fish? Do you eat the weeds (the edible ones) in your yard/garden? Does this contribute significantly to your diet?

City or country or suburbs? Location or climate?

193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

(1260)

on August 22, 2012
at 03:46 PM

Thanks! The apartment complex eventually put the garden on the complex tour; I took that as a sign that they were pleased with what I'd done.

A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on August 22, 2012
at 03:27 PM

Awesome initiative!

29518a2572c5fe3a851170a9b1c315f3

on June 05, 2012
at 07:54 PM

Sounds like a dream !

46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

(1876)

on June 05, 2012
at 06:55 PM

I would also like to add that we have friends who have chickens, so we get free eggs, we make our own maple syrup on the farm (although since going paleo I dont' consume any), we drink the raw milk from the cows on the farm, we have made our own butter, we usually split one cow and one pig a year with another friend - most of what we have is self sufficient as of this year.

46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

(1876)

on June 05, 2012
at 06:52 PM

Well, we really enjoy it as a family activity (the gardening, preserving, hunting, and fishing). It is also really nice to capitalize on other's wastefulness by scoffing up all the meat that they literally plan on throwing away every year. As long as it is vacuum sealed and smells/looks fine when thawed, it goes in our bellies!

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6244)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:23 PM

great that you have these options and use them well!

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Makes two jealous ones. :)

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Boletus Edulis, aka porcino or cep.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:23 PM

I'm jealous of you!

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:14 PM

What kind of mushrooms do you gather?

  • 5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

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15 Answers

12
46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

on June 05, 2012
at 04:13 PM

I live in a very, VERY rural area in Vermont. Both my husband and I hunt for game birds, turkeys, and deer. We fill all of our tags every year and stock up the chest freezer. We also fish plenty and there is always ample supply of local fish. We also willingly take people's 'last year's' game meat that they are going to toss to make room for fresh meat every year. I would say that 75% of our protein is wild caught. Also, we did start a garden this year AND occupy over half of my in-law's garden that we eat fresh and are going to start canning this year. I also forage for fiddleheads, ramps, and 'shrooms. Now that I am paleo, very little of my food actually comes from the store.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6244)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:23 PM

great that you have these options and use them well!

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:23 PM

I'm jealous of you!

46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

(1876)

on June 05, 2012
at 06:52 PM

Well, we really enjoy it as a family activity (the gardening, preserving, hunting, and fishing). It is also really nice to capitalize on other's wastefulness by scoffing up all the meat that they literally plan on throwing away every year. As long as it is vacuum sealed and smells/looks fine when thawed, it goes in our bellies!

46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

(1876)

on June 05, 2012
at 06:55 PM

I would also like to add that we have friends who have chickens, so we get free eggs, we make our own maple syrup on the farm (although since going paleo I dont' consume any), we drink the raw milk from the cows on the farm, we have made our own butter, we usually split one cow and one pig a year with another friend - most of what we have is self sufficient as of this year.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Makes two jealous ones. :)

29518a2572c5fe3a851170a9b1c315f3

on June 05, 2012
at 07:54 PM

Sounds like a dream !

4
0a6376917fcaee2c65fbf614543f62cb

on June 05, 2012
at 04:13 PM

I have a backyard garden. The spinach is all done now, but I am eating Swiss chard, green beans, sweet peas, carrots, beets, eggplant, tomatoes and peppers. I have a friend who grows my beef and another friend who supplies my eggs.

3
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:28 PM

I forage mushrooms and greens but it doesn't amount to much. I suppose the mushrooms kind of do since without the foraging there's no way I would pay for chanterelles and we end up with about 5-10lbs raw chanterelles each year. In addition to those I find puffballs and Hericium mushrooms. The greens I find include common yard weeds like chickweed, plantain elongata and wild mustard plus the stuff I find in the woods like miner's lettuce and stinging nettles. I live in a coastal suburb with a lot of easy access to open spaces and designated wilderness. Someday maybe I will try surf fishing.

3
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:14 PM

I hunt, but it's a recreational hobby and not the base of my families meat intake. One of my favorite hunting areas has two wild tangerine trees, one pecan tree, and a slew of blackberry patches (I avoid them in the summer months, as they attract rodents, which in turn attracts very nasty Florida poisonous snakes, plus the fruit isn't properly ripe until it gets cold anyway). Even if I don't shoot anything, I still come home with a bag of wild food.

2
193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

on August 22, 2012
at 02:23 PM

I have an apartment garden. I found an old flower bed and decided to repurpose it. It's always easier to ask for forgiveness than permission, so I just put things in the ground and then informed the office :)

It's pretty simple to do, and if you don't have ground access, you can use containers. My garden inspired my neighbors, and soon there was a small green belt in the back of the complex. My brother also (in a different city) had decent success with gardening in the planter boxes around his apartment.

Right up until the arrival of my twins (and the subsequent loss of anything resembling time for cooking/gardening/sleeping/etc) the garden accounted for a good amount of our diet. Lots of tomatoes, squash, peppers. I never got to enjoy the melons, unfortunately, but I'll try again next spring.

We move to a new place in 3 weeks, and I'll have a much larger area to work with. I plan to expand the garden and to build a chicken coop as well. Here are some pictures of my apartment garden (over 2 summers).

-EDIT- I live in South Texas, zone 8b.

Before: do-you-produce-some-of-your-own-food?-do-you-hunt/gather-any-of-your-food?

Last summer: do-you-produce-some-of-your-own-food?-do-you-hunt/gather-any-of-your-food?

This summer (prior to planting): do-you-produce-some-of-your-own-food?-do-you-hunt/gather-any-of-your-food?

A typical spring day's haul (this year, before the tomatoes ripened): do-you-produce-some-of-your-own-food?-do-you-hunt/gather-any-of-your-food?

Heirloom awesomeness: do-you-produce-some-of-your-own-food?-do-you-hunt/gather-any-of-your-food?

193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

(1260)

on August 22, 2012
at 03:46 PM

Thanks! The apartment complex eventually put the garden on the complex tour; I took that as a sign that they were pleased with what I'd done.

A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on August 22, 2012
at 03:27 PM

Awesome initiative!

2
62fafa8cb15af7c562fa8c270f7b6174

on August 22, 2012
at 01:54 AM

I grow about 16 green bean plants every year on the back porch railing of my 1 bedroom efficiency, in recycling containers filled with soil. I like them best finely chopped raw in salads now. I do pole and bush beans, the pole beans make a nice privacy wall from the liquor store parking lot next door.

2
3351f6c8ec1ea64435e419f380ca6468

(1255)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:49 PM

Suburban garden - I have 3 square-foot style raised beds, 2 are 4'x8' and the other is 3'x8'. I also have 4 half-barrels with food plants in them. Currently I'm growing raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, tomatoes, onions and garlic, carrots, mesclun mix lettuces, and cucumbers. The raspberries and strawberries have taken over one of the raised beds and are in the process of occupying a second one, since they're semi-invasive perennials, and I'm doing the blueberries in barrels to control the acidity of the soil - we live in Colorado and our soil is on the alkaline side.

I can't say that we are remotely self-sufficient even in what we do grow, but it's a nice addition to our diet - and much fresher than we could get elsewhere.

2
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:36 PM

It's not much of my diet, but I do forage for spring greens like mustard, plantain, chickweed, miner's lettuce, dandelion, and sheep sorrel. There are a few months in the year I can just step outside to the parts of our lot that we keep more natural and get a salad.

I live in rural Oregon, and there is a lot of great foraging possibility. I'm hoping to take advantage of more of them this year. Mushrooms galore, though I've only searched for morels, but I hope to find some chanterelles this fall. Berries, of course. Blackberries and huckleberries are everywhere in late summer. I found some hazelnut trees and am hoping to go harvest those this fall.

I wish I was a more motivated fisher, but alas. I grew up in New Mexico and just don't have a taste for fish. I also wish I had access to more wild game, but instead I try to source all my meat from local ranches.

2
4b05d725a8332e8e917a4ca58b6e8a1e

(1239)

on June 05, 2012
at 05:18 PM

I live in a Pacific NW suburb bordering on a rural area. My backyard garden makes up about 75% of our summer vegetable/berry intake and the stuff I preserve (mostly tomatoes and various fermented veggies) lasts through May of the following year. We have chickens for eggs, but not for meat. We rarely eat chicken anyway, so it's no loss. We do a LOT of fishing and some hunting, but we still order a side of beef every six months or so from the farmer down the road.

I would love to expand my garden and start raising my own meat animals, but that will have to wait until I have more than 1/4 of an acre to work with.

2
724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:03 PM

I forage for mushrooms every year, and this year I have a little plot in a community garden.

Neither activity accounts for much of my diet if viewed as a percentage.

I'm a city dweller.

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Boletus Edulis, aka porcino or cep.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:14 PM

What kind of mushrooms do you gather?

1
13a407bc695ea2b2d13ca5f5ab0f8885

on August 22, 2012
at 05:38 PM

I grow a big garden that supplies us with a decent amount of tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, kale, basil, thyme, onions, strawberries. We also have blackberries in the back and a ton around the area here we forage for quite a bit.

In the spring we are always out looking for morel mushrooms and stop often to harvest milkweed, dandelions and cattails.

For meat we hunt a lot! Early fall is for big game. Last year I shot a shiras moose which provides us with just shy of 400 pounds of meat and a black bear. I just got done with a brined bear ham that was out of this world.

Late fall and winter I hunt upland birds like pheasants, quail and chukar and ducks and geese. That supplies quite a few winter dinners and we make a lot of jerky from the ducks and geese to last almost all year. We have a limit of 4 geese per day so that is about 10-12 pounds of meat for jerky per hunting day.

This year we have a couple of bear tags, 2 deers tags and a few wyoming antelope tags. In wyoming you can pick up doe antelope tags to get some meat while chasing trophy bucks.

We also just bought a hog from a local farmer that raises them on an outside paddock and feeds them leftover produce from the local markets here. I cured almost 30 pounds of bacon, rendered 2 quarts or lard and ground most of the fat to add to our big game meat for sausage.

Generally with the exception of wild shrimp and salmon we don't buy meat from the store.

Our new project is we are raising 30 red ranger broilers in the back yard for our chicken needs. They are 2 weeks old now and will be harvested at approx 70 days. They will be put out this week into an 6x8 chicken tractor that is moved to fresh grass in the backyard every day. We live in a regular home in a HOA that doesn't allow chickens. But we have had enough. We just chose to be in control of what we eat. The chickens add about 90 pounds of nitrogen to the grass per month and help to aerate the lawn so we will deal with any issues we have when we have them.

I have always been big about what we eat and a bit of a foodie but since going paleo 15 months ago even more so.

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on August 22, 2012
at 05:20 PM

I grow as much food as I can. (I live in an apartment in northern Virginia.) If I'd planned better this year I could've gotten at least twice as many plants on our balcony. As it is, this is what I've grown:

  • Red Russian and Tuscan kale (multiple plants; just planted fall crop)
  • Collards
  • Heirloom tomatoes (one plant this year)
  • Japanese eggplant (one plant)
  • Zucchini (two plants--not an awesome year for my plants)
  • Blueberries (one plant)
  • dwarf heirloom pumpkins (two varieties, 3 total vines)
  • carrots (around the tomatoes and other plants-- maybe two dozen total)
  • various herbs (dill, two varieties basil, Italian parsley, mint, rosemary, thyme, lavender)
  • green beans (two vines)

I also forage whenever possible. When we lived in the PNW I used to go pick wild blackberries and dandelion greens. Here it's mostly dandelion greens because I can identify them, but I can't get to ones without pesticides regularly.

1
A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on August 22, 2012
at 02:59 PM

I don't have a car and have to walk about four miles total on the weekends to go to all the different markets and stores to get my food... can I call that foraging? I am so bitterly jealous of the real hunters and foragers!

1
394492a4bc534ad39091792287fddd96

on August 22, 2012
at 02:44 PM

We live in upstate NY (small town atmosphere) and have a productive little family garden. Currently I would estimate that about 50% of our total veggie diet comes from the back yard. My husband is also a hunter (waterfowl, wild birds and deer) and we've been fortunate to have a freezer full of game meat each year as well. I would estimate that about 60% of our meat-based protein comes from meat he harvested. We don't currently eat any weed matter that sprouts up :)

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 22, 2012
at 01:20 PM

City living -- I grow almost all of my own herbs and spices. I also grow zucchini (bad year this year), tomatoes, and green beans.

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