2

votes

Did anything ever unexpectedly alleviate your psoriasis?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 24, 2011 at 8:12 PM

Yesterday I went to a party after my usual Friday IF, and brought a bunch of not-good-but-not-terrible junk food from Trader Joe's (salt and pepper potato chips, tzatziki, pub cheese, guacamole, bleu cheese dip). I ended up pigging out on the chips, the tzatziki, the pub cheese, and a smaller amount of things other people had brought, like tortilla chips, buffalo chicken dip, and salsa verde. I had a couple of whiskeys, one peated, and a gin and St. Germain cocktail to drink; nothing that's unusual in my regular diet. I woke up this morning and my psoriasis was unusually smooth and without much fresh scaling at all, which is the opposite effect of what I would have expected.

I asked a trusted family member with similar afflictions about this phenomenon, and her response was, "All the crap suppressed your immune system, maybe? I've had that same effect before, and honestly, that's the best explanation I've come up with."

So my question to the PH psoriasis-suffering community is, what things have you done that unexpectedly made your psoriasis flare down? Have you come up with explanations why? Is it because of a suppressed immune system? I'm very interested to know.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Currently my regimen is a multivitamin, magnesium supplement (Source Naturals Ultra-Mag), 12000IU of Vitamin D (Vitamin Shoppe 5000IU drops), and 15mg Vitamin K (Thorne Research K2 drops). The extra D in particular has helped immensely. In the past I tried topical Vitamin E with no results, but it may be the case that I need to take it internally. Even though I have yet to do this for myself, your brother may want to try dairy elimination as well as vitamin supplementation.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on December 26, 2011
at 11:57 PM

Mem, a very interesting link. Thanks!

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on December 12, 2011
at 09:35 PM

@air_hadoken...Thanks for your thoughtfulness! I am cool with just commenting. If interested, i will bring some other links as i have a strongg interest in skin stuff. I will try and remember to do tonight.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:15 AM

Interesting point, that your symptoms were worse when you drank less. My example cited alcohol but I would be interested in less specific (more general) analysis of the relationship between liver toxicity (of various kinds) and the skin's eliminative desire to "help get rid." Somehow this "should" be true but I do not know whether it really is!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 10, 2011
at 11:51 PM

Thanks for that. It seems though that psoriasis incidence is elevated even in heavy drinkers (more than 2.5 drinks per day on average) that have no liver disease at all. I guess what I don't take home from this, on a personal level, is how it jibes with the face that my psoriasis was much worse at age 24-25 when I was drinking much less (mostly based on frequency) than I do now.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 10, 2011
at 11:39 PM

Thanks for that, mem. Can you make that an answer so I can give you rep via upvoting?

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on December 10, 2011
at 11:35 PM

http://www.drsharma.ca/glp-1-receptor-agonists-obesity-and-psoriasis.html

Medium avatar

(8239)

on December 10, 2011
at 06:25 PM

Correlation: demonstrated. Causation: speculative. "The highly significant relation between alcohol consumption and psoriasis is not synonymous with a causative relation; whether alcohol enhances the onset of psoriasis or psoriasis enhances the onset of alcoholism is not known. Prospective studies of abstinence in subjects with psoriasis and studies of the sequence of development of psoriasis and alcoholism might give a clue to the role of alcohol in psoriasis." (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1416149/pdf/bmjcred00455-0027a.pdf)

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 10, 2011
at 06:03 AM

I think you may be confusing correlation with causation.

48f88cfbc4d95abdaf0fd4e1acdcba83

(358)

on September 25, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Just tell them it's a hickey. A wild hickey.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 25, 2011
at 03:02 AM

I've been paleo for 6 months, but my strictness has varied. I'm a foodie so I will allow myself to feast when there is a feast to be had. I've had psoriasis continuously since about age 18, with occasional localized flareups before that. I'm 31 now but have been supplementing vitamins since I was 28, which has helped quite a bit. When I was 24 people always thought I had a hickey because of a big ugly patch of it on my neck (it was far from the only one).

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 25, 2011
at 02:56 AM

@paleosaurus: I mean an immune system that has been weakened in its power or capability, in this case one that is less able to attack my own skin. @ben61820 it's a cheddar cheese and whey product, that's been whipped with air to make it spreadable or dippable.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 25, 2011
at 02:14 AM

The hell is pub cheese?

4876929b606551d66ebec7536a9cdbb8

on September 24, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Wow that's interesting, what do you mean by a "suppressed immune" system?

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 24, 2011
at 08:39 PM

I supplement with D3 daily as well. It's made a huge difference but is not quite enough to make it go away completely.

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5 Answers

best answer

1
48f88cfbc4d95abdaf0fd4e1acdcba83

(358)

on September 25, 2011
at 01:55 AM

This is an interesting case. I'm glad that your symptoms were mitigated somehow- but I have no clue how. All the stuff you ate were supposed to be inflammatory; the alcohol usually makes people flare up. I personally can't have it, because I know that I would get hot, uncomfortable and itchy.

Immune suppression does make sense to some degree; but I can't make the connection between what you ate and the mitigation of your psoriasis. If you've been eating paleo for a while, maybe your gut improved, allowing you a greater tolerance level for potential toxins or allergens. But this case is a bit too general to analyze. Who knows how you will feel tomorrow, or the day after that? (Hopefully nothing bad will happen!)

I don't have a miracle food for my p.

How long have you had psoriasis, and how long have you been eating paleo?

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 25, 2011
at 03:02 AM

I've been paleo for 6 months, but my strictness has varied. I'm a foodie so I will allow myself to feast when there is a feast to be had. I've had psoriasis continuously since about age 18, with occasional localized flareups before that. I'm 31 now but have been supplementing vitamins since I was 28, which has helped quite a bit. When I was 24 people always thought I had a hickey because of a big ugly patch of it on my neck (it was far from the only one).

48f88cfbc4d95abdaf0fd4e1acdcba83

(358)

on September 25, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Just tell them it's a hickey. A wild hickey.

1
Bebca5be026bf2633648452db9641859

(225)

on December 10, 2011
at 06:12 PM

What vitamins do you take? My brother was recently diagnosed and is struggling with it.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Currently my regimen is a multivitamin, magnesium supplement (Source Naturals Ultra-Mag), 12000IU of Vitamin D (Vitamin Shoppe 5000IU drops), and 15mg Vitamin K (Thorne Research K2 drops). The extra D in particular has helped immensely. In the past I tried topical Vitamin E with no results, but it may be the case that I need to take it internally. Even though I have yet to do this for myself, your brother may want to try dairy elimination as well as vitamin supplementation.

1
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on December 10, 2011
at 05:19 AM

So I had a thought this week. During this cheat day, I was eating a lot of chips. These chips were fried in seed oils and therefore high in PUFAs. But because these were PUFA-rich oils, they may have had Vitamin E in them. I may have gotten a high dose of Vitamin E without realizing it. Further investigation is warranted.

1
6a26f2ca2cd1c5c5afcda9276b309a9c

(579)

on September 24, 2011
at 08:29 PM

No but I started taking vitamin D3 the other day because apparently psoriasis and d3 deficiencies are linked. Just something you might want to give a go as well.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 24, 2011
at 08:39 PM

I supplement with D3 daily as well. It's made a huge difference but is not quite enough to make it go away completely.

0
Medium avatar

on December 10, 2011
at 05:26 AM

Psoriasis is very often the body's way of saying the liver is compromised.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 10, 2011
at 06:03 AM

I think you may be confusing correlation with causation.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on December 10, 2011
at 06:25 PM

Correlation: demonstrated. Causation: speculative. "The highly significant relation between alcohol consumption and psoriasis is not synonymous with a causative relation; whether alcohol enhances the onset of psoriasis or psoriasis enhances the onset of alcoholism is not known. Prospective studies of abstinence in subjects with psoriasis and studies of the sequence of development of psoriasis and alcoholism might give a clue to the role of alcohol in psoriasis." (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1416149/pdf/bmjcred00455-0027a.pdf)

Medium avatar

(8239)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:15 AM

Interesting point, that your symptoms were worse when you drank less. My example cited alcohol but I would be interested in less specific (more general) analysis of the relationship between liver toxicity (of various kinds) and the skin's eliminative desire to "help get rid." Somehow this "should" be true but I do not know whether it really is!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 10, 2011
at 11:51 PM

Thanks for that. It seems though that psoriasis incidence is elevated even in heavy drinkers (more than 2.5 drinks per day on average) that have no liver disease at all. I guess what I don't take home from this, on a personal level, is how it jibes with the face that my psoriasis was much worse at age 24-25 when I was drinking much less (mostly based on frequency) than I do now.

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