2

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Chemistry Question - Hydrolyzed?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 05, 2012 at 2:23 AM

I know there are quite a few chemists out there. Can anyone explain to me what it means when a food ingredient is hydrolyzed, why it would be hydrolyzed, and if this is a good or bad thing (in terms of a Paleo diet).

Thank you very much in advance, I am your humble slave.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 05, 2012
at 09:41 AM

Its not another word for MSG. MSG is hydrolized but the two aren't interchangeable.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 05, 2012
at 04:04 AM

I'll add pictures if I find some good ones, pictures always help! :)

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Act sicker. lol. Do what you want!!

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:44 AM

Awesome explanation(I'm not smart enough to understand a dang I just read -my brain hurts)

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:32 AM

Low quality, highly processed foods almost much exclusively in my experience.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:30 AM

TY that was great.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:29 AM

Thanks so much for asking. Honestly, I am losing all of my "sympathy" because people are telling me I look good. Jeez, next thing you know my husband will expect me to start cleaning the house again!

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:20 AM

Glad to hear that. Hang in!

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:19 AM

ohhhhhh. Oops :p

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:11 AM

@Crowlover Oh, TY for asking! Better than I expected given all the chemo.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:10 AM

Oh, not one specific label that I can think of offhand, but I see it all the time.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:07 AM

How are you feeling?

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5 Answers

10
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:27 AM

Hydrolyzed will most of the time refer to proteins. Proteins are made up of amino acids that are linked together by peptide bonds. The peptide bond is a linkage between an amine of one amino acid with the carboxylic acid of another amino acid. When you link two animo acids together, you produce a water molecule (making peptide bonds is a dehydration process). To you break (lyze) that bond, you need to add a molecule of water (hydro)... hence, hydrolysis. Here's an amide (aka peptide) bond being hydrolyzed:

chemistry-question---hydrolyzed?

It's not just proteins though that can be hydrolyzed. Carbohydrate polymers (polysaccharides) are individual sugars linked in a dehydrative manner. To break down a polymer, you must also hydrolyze bonds linking individual sugar units. In the case of starch, you have a polymer of glucose, that hydrolyzes to individual glucose molecules.

Triglycerides are esters of fatty acids with glycerol. Again, you can hydrolyze these ester bonds, ultimately producing glycerol and free fatty acids.

In essence, hydroylysis is digestion. Our bodies do it naturally, via stomach acids and enzymes. It can also be done to produce processed foods. MSG, high fructose corn syrup... both are products of hydrolysis. Not to say that all products of hydrolysis are bad though. Our bodies do release MSG during digestion (in larger quantities than folks would ever get fro a Chinese buffet) and we liberate all sorts of sugar when we digest starches.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:30 AM

TY that was great.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 05, 2012
at 04:04 AM

I'll add pictures if I find some good ones, pictures always help! :)

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:44 AM

Awesome explanation(I'm not smart enough to understand a dang I just read -my brain hurts)

5
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:09 AM

Regarding a protein that is hydrolyzed, it means broken down into smaller amino acids from a long chain of them. I suppose it could be good or bad in a food, which food do you see that label in?

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:32 AM

Low quality, highly processed foods almost much exclusively in my experience.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:10 AM

Oh, not one specific label that I can think of offhand, but I see it all the time.

2
4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

on July 05, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Wow. Its like I think I should know this but.... kinda don't or do I?

Based on just the word itself I think that water is used to separate, or a water molecule is added. I know Lysis means to separate. Hydro means water.

OK I have my answer - I do not know. lol

0
Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on July 05, 2012
at 06:56 PM

J. Stanton wrote an excellent piece on hydrolyzed vegetable proteins and why they are so prevalent in processed food.

http://www.gnolls.org/3089/what-are-hydrolyzed-soy-protein-and-hydrolyzed-wheat-protein-and-why-are-they-in-everything/

Summary of article: When you extract the oils from corn, soy, etc, you are left with mostly vegetable protein. Hydrolysis (i.e., basically chemical digestion on an industrial scale) is then used to break down the proteins into amino acids such as glutamic acid, known as glutamate in its anionic form. Free glutamate is the molecule that plugs into the taste receptor we call “umami”.

"Conclusion

*"Hydrolyzed vegetable protein" is a flavor enhancer…

*…because it stimulates our umami taste receptors, just like soy sauce, Parmesan cheese, or MSG.

*However, it’s much cheaper than real food, because the USA heavily subsidizes the production of corn, soy, and wheat…

*…and, in the case of soy and corn, it’s made from a byproduct of soy and corn oil manufacturing that would otherwise be fed to cattle."

0
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:08 AM

Hydrolized is another word for MSG. Hydrolized yeast extract, hydrolized vegetable protein. It's all MSG. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosodium_glutamate

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 05, 2012
at 03:19 AM

ohhhhhh. Oops :p

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 05, 2012
at 09:41 AM

Its not another word for MSG. MSG is hydrolized but the two aren't interchangeable.

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