5

votes

Why should I avoid food reward again???

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 01, 2012 at 5:05 PM

Making my first batch of grass-fed ox-tail stew in the slowcooker.

Paleo potpourri, I tell you! The house smells like foodie heaven.

Sigh, I'm really lousy at avoiding food reward. Not even sure that avoiding food reward from Real Food is desirable.

I mean, I understand the hyper-tasty fake foods should be avoided, but I feel that all fake food should be avoided.

Why should I avoid the food reward of Real Food???

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on April 01, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Exactly ... "food reward of real food" is the desired state.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 01, 2012
at 05:46 PM

Yeah, anything we enjoy must be removed from our eating mix--I'm glad that's only a gag!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 01, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Mega-high reward for dogs :)

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on April 01, 2012
at 05:21 PM

Ha ha ha ... April Fools! Got me again.

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4 Answers

best answer

2
560db54689099082bd5b88c73e22b285

on April 01, 2012
at 07:58 PM

I've been thinking about this a lot and have some thoughts (gonna do a blog on it soon).

Here is my take: There is palatability (yummy tasting) and there is satisfaction (left me feeling well nourished/fed, no longer hungry). There are degrees of both.

I can eat highly satisfying food and not get "out of control" (no binging/overeating). But, when it comes to HIGHLY palatable food (generally anything that mixes sweet carbs and fat, currently sweet potatoes slices backed with coconut oil and sprinkled with salt, really get me going) I have a tendency to overeat, which can then trigger ongoing cravings and a trend of overeating. And that's where the problem is.

I think if you're truly eating good, clean, whole food, occasionally eating a High Reward food isn't a horrible thing, but if you have a tendency towards overeating/binging, then doing so in a very controlled and isolated fashion is imperative. So, I put just a few sweet potato slices on a small plate, eat only that amount, and only do it once a week or so.

For me, it's about containment. I focus on low to moderately palatable foods with high satisfaction levels (meat, eggs, bacon, cheese, non-starchy veggies, etc.) and stay present and disciplined when helping myself to occasional, small amounts of highly palatable (high reward) foods.

Make sense?

5
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on April 01, 2012
at 06:37 PM

The "food reward/palatability" theory has a really stupid name. The critical issue is food satiation, not palatability.

Real food well prepared is palatable yet satiating. The industrial Western diet consists largely of crap modified by food scientists to be palatable and non-satiating.

Fortunately, eating a diet of real food renders fake food less palatable.

2
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on April 01, 2012
at 05:40 PM

As I understand it, food reward isn't simply about food that tastes good. It's about foods that we are inclined to eat addictively to excess. One of the prime offenders is fatty carbs, like potato chips, French fries, buttery croissants, crusty bread slathered with butter, etc. I love an 8oz steak with a pat of butter, but I'm completely satisfied with that one portion. Give me a big bag of Kettle Chips, and I'll eat the whole bag in one sitting.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on April 01, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Exactly ... "food reward of real food" is the desired state.

1
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on April 01, 2012
at 05:11 PM

On a side note, the smell does seem to be driving my dog Mad with Desire for what I've got in the pot... but that happens pretty often.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 01, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Mega-high reward for dogs :)

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