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Do FODMAP sensitive people do better with raw or cooked food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 20, 2011 at 5:36 AM

I don't want a general raw vs. cooked answer, but only an answer from people who are sensitive to FODMAP.

If there is a particular food you react too, such as apple, do you do better with a raw apple or baked apple?

Bonus question: Why? What happens during cooking to make it more/less of a problem?

Medium avatar

(3029)

on August 20, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Not for me, but I'm asking for a friend. She has all sorts of weird food issues that don't look like anything that anyone else has. When I told her about FODMAPs, it fit. She's sensitive to many on the list. But for all of them, she feels better eating them raw than cooked. Like I suspected, that isn't typical. I'm wondering if it has anything to do with enzymes.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 20, 2011
at 03:44 PM

cooked. I can sort of eat very well cooked onions.

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4 Answers

2
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on August 20, 2011
at 01:20 PM

I'm FODMAP and Nightshade sensitive along with a whole bunch of other things!!

Definitely cooked veggies are easier to digest and highly recommended for those who have issues. Some fruits they recommend removing the peel (ie: apples) for those of us with compromised digestive tracks. (GAPS recommends applesauce for tummy issues but to remove all peels before cooking them)

Raw foods are much much harder to digest and will cause more strain on your system to break it down, creating more gas; you'll feel the results of this as your system is working harder.

Bonus question: not a scientific answer but compare a raw and cooked carrot, the cooked carrot is very tender and sweet and hardly needs chewing to swallow it. Once this hits your digestive system it is in a much better state to digest and doesn't demand as much effort for your system as a raw one would.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on August 20, 2011
at 01:50 PM

Starches, when cooked, become gelatanized which makes them easier to digest. Put cooked starched back in the fridge and you'll end up converting some of that gelatanized starch into resistant starch again. Resistant starch isn't a FODMAP per se but it is a soluble fiber that is fermented in the colon. I think FODMAPs are defined by being more quickly fermented (and, if I recall correctly, fermented higher up in the digestive tract). In any case, if you are having problems with FODMAPS cooking starch should only help.

As with actual FODMAPS, I don't know of any reason why cooking matters, but would be curious as well if anyone can chime in.

Medium avatar

(3029)

on August 20, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Not for me, but I'm asking for a friend. She has all sorts of weird food issues that don't look like anything that anyone else has. When I told her about FODMAPs, it fit. She's sensitive to many on the list. But for all of them, she feels better eating them raw than cooked. Like I suspected, that isn't typical. I'm wondering if it has anything to do with enzymes.

0
2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on August 20, 2011
at 11:22 AM

Cooked vegetables are easier to digest, reducing the potential of fermentation in the gut. I currently stay away from all fruit and honey since there's not much to be done about the fructose content. Fructose is a FODMAP too.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 20, 2011
at 05:46 AM

I am unable to eat raw fruit that has a pit or seed with the exception of citrus fruit. However if they are cooked not a problem at all.

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