2

votes

What are the favorite Paleo flours and why?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 16, 2011 at 1:44 AM

Recipes seem to commonly use Almond and Coconut. Why is that? Whole Foods seems to carry Hazelnut flour. Is it cost? I imagine walnut and macadamia would be better but would be prohibitively expensive (at least no one seems to sell it). Maybe it's the cooking temp? Has anyone tried to make flours out of veggies? I'm imagining drying and grinding a broccoli maybe.

2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on November 07, 2011
at 12:09 PM

All nuts aren't created equal.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 17, 2011
at 03:53 PM

I try to make a "Wellington" type burger with this mushroom powder. I take a meatball and cover the outside with liver pate, then I roll it in mushroom "flour". I then take a heated cast iron skillet with some kind of fat in it and sear the bottom and shove it in the oven for 5 minutes or so. I finish on the stovetop with some bone broth that I reduce down to a demi glace. It looks kinda gross but it's really good. (Can you tell I am IFing and dreaming about food?)

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:32 AM

Good suggestion. Yeah I really only use it for breading. I will see what other dried things I can find.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:30 AM

Zweet Potato and Mesquite seem interesting.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on October 16, 2011
at 03:29 PM

They also did a lot of other things too, especially under starvation conditions, which we would not call ideal. Also, we are using paleo to mean different things- if I was thinking of the paleo diet and the premise of not eating processed foods, versus many in this thread thinking using it to mean finding something on the 'safe list' to grind up into flour, versus the way you just used it- to refer to the actual people who lived in the paleolithic era.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 16, 2011
at 09:26 AM

it may be healthy but it is so damn sweet, I can't use it.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 16, 2011
at 03:34 AM

paleos did make "flours"

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 16, 2011
at 02:47 AM

BTW ALL RIGHTS RESERVED..PATENT PENDING...AND WHATEVER OTHER NONSENSE

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 16, 2011
at 02:46 AM

Sweet! Let me know how that broccoli thing works...maybe I could invest in a broccoli flour business...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 16, 2011
at 02:43 AM

I'd agree with cliff. Flours overall are less than ideal for me but those are the ones.

  • De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

    asked by

    (3747)
  • Views
    3.4K
  • Last Activity
    1259D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

11 Answers

best answer

8
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 16, 2011
at 02:29 PM

I don't like nut or coconut flours at all. Trying to make Paleo baked goods is really disappointing in my opinion. But sometimes you need a thickener or want some kind of breading for meat. For thickener I have used arrowroot. For breading I have used those Costco dried mushrooms whizzed in the blender to a flour consistency. The mushroom "flour" adds such a nice flavor.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 17, 2011
at 03:53 PM

I try to make a "Wellington" type burger with this mushroom powder. I take a meatball and cover the outside with liver pate, then I roll it in mushroom "flour". I then take a heated cast iron skillet with some kind of fat in it and sear the bottom and shove it in the oven for 5 minutes or so. I finish on the stovetop with some bone broth that I reduce down to a demi glace. It looks kinda gross but it's really good. (Can you tell I am IFing and dreaming about food?)

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:32 AM

Good suggestion. Yeah I really only use it for breading. I will see what other dried things I can find.

8
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 16, 2011
at 01:52 AM

rice flour

nuts aren't very healthy because of high polyunsaturated content

coconut flour would be my second pick but it has a lot of fiber

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 16, 2011
at 02:43 AM

I'd agree with cliff. Flours overall are less than ideal for me but those are the ones.

2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on November 07, 2011
at 12:09 PM

All nuts aren't created equal.

3
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on October 16, 2011
at 04:28 AM

Arrow root powder is about as "safe" as you can get. Just a ground up root. All starch, no bad stuff. I use it VERY sparingly as a fake "shake-and-bake" coating for fried chicken or pork.

2
Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on October 16, 2011
at 05:26 AM

what is a PALEO FLOUR?? def an oxymoron. that sounds as bad as vegan meat, like tofurkey.

2
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 16, 2011
at 04:43 AM

chestnut flour used to be a common ingredient in italian cooking; where does it fall in the list of lesser evils?

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 16, 2011
at 09:26 AM

it may be healthy but it is so damn sweet, I can't use it.

2
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on October 16, 2011
at 03:19 AM

I've got some tapioca flour, though I have yet to use it for much more than thickening some soup.

I must say though, that I regard the whole idea of flour, in general, to be neolithic. It is unlikely that there are any paleo flours. The whole idea of flour means a much more massive dose of whatever potential evil is in whatever it is that comprises the flour.

candy cigarettes

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 16, 2011
at 03:34 AM

paleos did make "flours"

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on October 16, 2011
at 03:29 PM

They also did a lot of other things too, especially under starvation conditions, which we would not call ideal. Also, we are using paleo to mean different things- if I was thinking of the paleo diet and the premise of not eating processed foods, versus many in this thread thinking using it to mean finding something on the 'safe list' to grind up into flour, versus the way you just used it- to refer to the actual people who lived in the paleolithic era.

1
D7b01bbfd0b91a12c4aea43fb20adf15

on November 07, 2011
at 10:41 AM

Buckwheat flour deserves a mention and is used by both Guyenet and the Jaminets as far as I know.

1
5680f5060a62bb3790478473a5643afe

(290)

on October 16, 2011
at 07:08 PM

What about mesquite flour? Z??calo Gourmet makes an array of flours in addition to mesquite including: Sweet Potato Flour, Maca Flour, and Ka??iwa Flour just to name a few. I am curious as to what the Paleo Community thinks of these alternatives. Input/Hackery would be much appreciated!

http://www.zocalogourmet.com/products/floursgrains2.html

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:30 AM

Zweet Potato and Mesquite seem interesting.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 16, 2011
at 02:56 AM

I keep almond and coconut flours on hand, they're useful at times. I don't make them a staple in my diet, but sometimes I crave a pancake or two.

0
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on October 16, 2011
at 02:51 PM

Any nut can be made into a "flour" just by whizzing in a coffee grinder, food processor, blender, sieving as you go and being careful that it doesn't turn into nut butter. For the best results I like to mix nut with rice flour, rice flour with coconut flour, tapioca flour, etc. The texture is so much better than just all of one kind.

For me, I experiment with little cookies and crusts and et al., but don't personally eat the them myself - I give away or take to parties and such. Baked goods aren't something that I miss but it's fun to mess around and see what I come up with.

0
D593d46146a6c725cb35829753775a16

on October 16, 2011
at 03:20 AM

Almond flour's consistency isn't really flour like, it is more of a almond meal, conconut flour takes on more of a real flour sort of feel.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!