2

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Thoughts on some of the alternative flours

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 25, 2010 at 7:46 PM

Even farther afield than the usual paleo suspects (almond flour, coconut flour, tapoica flour)... what say you to Sweet Potato Flour, Plantain Flour, Mesquite Meal flour?

427c8cbb9c2492d74b887fc5cf7a8ce0

(432)

on May 01, 2011
at 09:55 PM

I love chestnut flour. I get mine from Trails End Chestnuts (a bit more expensive than Italian chestnut flour but better quality and freshly milled).

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 28, 2011
at 07:16 AM

I just bought sweet potato flour from a company called Zocalo. They package a Mesquite flour and some other unusual flours like Lucuma and Yacon. I had never heard of most of these, but they sound very interesting, gluten free and grain free.

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on February 02, 2011
at 04:50 PM

Love mequite flour- sort of smoky sweet.

8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on December 25, 2010
at 09:17 PM

Plantain flour would be made by first drying plantains, and then blending/grinding it. I've made oat flour (not paleo) with a blender just from dry oats. Nothing really changes in that kind of process. Of course dehydration does affect some nutrients.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 25, 2010
at 08:54 PM

That recipe is great! Everyone loved them, Paleo or not.

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7 Answers

4
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on December 25, 2010
at 11:01 PM

as Olga said, the Processing matters Greatly.

I would add that the base ingredient matters as well.

Almonds for instance, are high in Omega 6, easily oxidized, and arguably bad in large doses. as much as many of you love your almond flour, im not a big fan. I believe it to be inflammatory.

some flours such as coconut are simply fiber. not friendly on your intestine, but ok in small doses.

some like rice flour are devoid of nutrients, simply a base glucose. a source of empty calories. I consider rice flour a "safe cheat"

Fruit flours I would imagine too much fructose.

of the above, id say shoot for the sweet potato flour. It stands a reasonable chance of still having some nutrients in it, without all the negatives. And I believe sweet potatoes to be a great source of whole food. The flour if processed properly slightly less so.

2
E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on December 25, 2010
at 08:02 PM

I may be wrong here, but I think that the tricky thing with all alternative flours is knowing what processing goes into its creation. I'd particularly want to be careful of any additives or nutrient depletion that go into the process. Almond flour can be made by just grinding up almonds. I'm somehow doubtful that plantain flour or sweet potato flour are that easy and pure to make.

If you want variety, some paleo/primal baking can be done without flour at all, like this recipe I recently made for the holidays: Almond Butter Pumpkin Blondies.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 25, 2010
at 08:54 PM

That recipe is great! Everyone loved them, Paleo or not.

8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on December 25, 2010
at 09:17 PM

Plantain flour would be made by first drying plantains, and then blending/grinding it. I've made oat flour (not paleo) with a blender just from dry oats. Nothing really changes in that kind of process. Of course dehydration does affect some nutrients.

1
Ba913e2cc77984c1b2079adfe3fd9f93

on December 26, 2010
at 12:56 PM

All of these are available from Barry's Farm.

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 26, 2010
at 02:17 AM

Some of harusame noodles are made from potato starch (others are made from mung beans). I've been trying to find the potato based ones so I could read more of the ingredient listing. The Japanese have a lot of interesting foods made with less common ingredients. Some of these less offensive sources make for good cheats where you can get a bit of taste without causing too much damage.

1
127116e41acceee9f2f000076f8b788d

(477)

on December 26, 2010
at 12:21 AM

mesquite flour is super tasty, and really, you have to be the source. I don't find it available commercially.

I would say it should be the best of the ones mentioned.

Since mesquite flour is not made from the seed, but actually the pith, it won't have some of the grain issues.

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on February 02, 2011
at 04:50 PM

Love mequite flour- sort of smoky sweet.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 28, 2011
at 07:16 AM

I just bought sweet potato flour from a company called Zocalo. They package a Mesquite flour and some other unusual flours like Lucuma and Yacon. I had never heard of most of these, but they sound very interesting, gluten free and grain free.

0
9bc6f3df8db981f67ea1465411958c8d

on December 29, 2010
at 11:23 AM

Lets not forget chestnut flower!

427c8cbb9c2492d74b887fc5cf7a8ce0

(432)

on May 01, 2011
at 09:55 PM

I love chestnut flour. I get mine from Trails End Chestnuts (a bit more expensive than Italian chestnut flour but better quality and freshly milled).

0
2d5221fa80d04a3d8ac6f471f9feae81

(894)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:27 PM

The only reasonably priced paleo flours that I saw were Coconut and Tapioca.

Coconut is good for crusts or anything that's 'crumbly'. It's ok but too much fiber, IMO. My real fascination is with Tapioca. Works perfectly for crepes and other types of pancakes, which are some of my favorite junk foods. In fact, Tapioca seems to work for just about anything with little need for recipe adaptation.

Have not noticed sweet potato flour anywhere. Given Cordain's recent take on bananas/plantains in autoimmunity I'm having doubts about the plantain crisps and flours...

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