2

votes

How can I thicken a Soup?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 20, 2012 at 1:41 PM

I want to make a bisque soup for Christmas. The recipe calls for one cup of flour to thicken it. What is the best replacement Paleo-friendly flour to use and is the replacement a 1:1 ratio or something different?

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on February 21, 2013
at 08:38 PM

Pureed cooked veggies is the French way. Effective and flavorful.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on December 25, 2012
at 03:34 PM

Thank you for all the good comments. I used arrowroot flour and it came out great.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 21, 2012
at 06:42 AM

+1 for Blend until creamy. You can do this to half of the solid matter to that it still has whole pieces of stuff floating in it.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 21, 2012
at 06:41 AM

You can only thinken a soup for as long as you can hold your breath.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 21, 2012
at 04:03 AM

Mmm egg yolks. They add a much richness as well.

91119f53c3827f5c7fc90b98cab85b04

(799)

on December 20, 2012
at 07:09 PM

I suppose you can still use the butter in the saute at the beginning without much of a chance of it separating - it would be interesting to try a kind of Beurre manié application with potato or cornstarch

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 20, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Sam, it's not about less water. Thickening soup is about texture. less water means less broth, same consistency. Thickening soup (especially with corn starch) gives the soup a velvety texture. Starting with a rue gives the soup a nutty taste on the tough and allows for spicy flavors with a smooth after taste.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 20, 2012
at 05:08 PM

The only problem with slurry thickeners over roux is that you won't impart the butter flavor, which is fairly important to a bisque.

956bcad1d462d433a4e1e22f6e3355d5

(1191)

on December 20, 2012
at 04:34 PM

So CD gets my vote.

956bcad1d462d433a4e1e22f6e3355d5

(1191)

on December 20, 2012
at 04:33 PM

Not an answer to your question but doesn't adding less water thicken it? I personally get the hibbie jibbies from frankenfoods.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 20, 2012
at 04:11 PM

This sounds like your best bet. Pro-tip: use a whisk to pass it through a sieve or China cap right before serving to smooth the lumps. A ricer works also, if you have one.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on December 20, 2012
at 02:33 PM

This would be better than a wheat based product but I don't really want to use a grain but thanks.

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13 Answers

7
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 20, 2012
at 02:15 PM

Typical answers include: Coconut/rice flour, Arrowroot powder, Tomato paste, reduced coconut milk\heavy cream, etc.

My personal preference is:

  1. Chop Caulifower
  2. Roast until slightly brown
  3. cook in chicken stock
  4. blend until creamy
  5. add heavy cream and use as base of bisque

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 21, 2012
at 06:42 AM

+1 for Blend until creamy. You can do this to half of the solid matter to that it still has whole pieces of stuff floating in it.

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on February 21, 2013
at 08:38 PM

Pureed cooked veggies is the French way. Effective and flavorful.

3
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on December 20, 2012
at 02:52 PM

Tapioca starch works nicely as a substitute for flour if you want to make a roux.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 20, 2012
at 04:11 PM

This sounds like your best bet. Pro-tip: use a whisk to pass it through a sieve or China cap right before serving to smooth the lumps. A ricer works also, if you have one.

2
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on December 20, 2012
at 02:27 PM

This link has a ton of suggesstionS that might help - http://www.foodsubs.com/Thicken.html. I like egg yolks but they may not add the degree of thickness that you're looking for and there is a risk of scrambling them if one isn't careful...

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 21, 2012
at 04:03 AM

Mmm egg yolks. They add a much richness as well.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 20, 2012
at 05:44 PM

I would use pur??e veggie. Something neutral like cauliflower, zucchini, or sweet potato.

1
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on December 20, 2012
at 04:09 PM

You can't think in a soup... GET OUT OF IT, QUICK!

lol... couldn't resist...

0
68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on February 20, 2013
at 02:04 PM

I use arrowroot or cornflour - pretty much just pure starch. You shouldn't need a whole cup, though. Chestnut flour doesn't work.

I also use xanthan gum, produced by bacteria. Not paleo but doesn't seem massively harmful to me unless you're very sensitive coeliac, you only need a tiny bit and it works like a dream.

0
7837ced93c164951d4f210bca6c925fe

(10)

on February 20, 2013
at 05:31 AM

Grind up some almonds. I think store-bought almond flour has more carbs for some reason.

0
B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f

(1495)

on December 27, 2012
at 09:57 PM

I make thick soups by using just a little broth. I thicken liquid in other dishes (like curries) usually with a little coconut flour (add just a little at a time, stir in, recheck the thickness and add repeat as needed).

0
914ddce57e2a6c798a286ff136885ced

on December 27, 2012
at 08:38 PM

A made a mock cream of crab. I used mashed cauliflower and chicken broth. It really was amazing. You could use arrow root but you have to be very careful. If you use too much it will make it jelly like and it is gross.

0
245cbe47a4a092c07f494233c4c28a5c

(269)

on December 21, 2012
at 02:53 AM

Also, gelatin works. Not enough to make it gooey but enough to bind up some of the liquid. Also probably the most paleo friendly option.

0
6f4425e3c7dc0efe60da531c5d991487

on December 20, 2012
at 05:35 PM

Try an almond flour roux.

0
91119f53c3827f5c7fc90b98cab85b04

(799)

on December 20, 2012
at 04:27 PM

Potato starch, 1 or 2 Tbsp dissolved in 1/4 cup of broth and stirred in to the soup, when it comes back up to a boil that will thicken it - same with Arrowroot - good for thickening gravies too

91119f53c3827f5c7fc90b98cab85b04

(799)

on December 20, 2012
at 07:09 PM

I suppose you can still use the butter in the saute at the beginning without much of a chance of it separating - it would be interesting to try a kind of Beurre manié application with potato or cornstarch

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 20, 2012
at 05:08 PM

The only problem with slurry thickeners over roux is that you won't impart the butter flavor, which is fairly important to a bisque.

0
2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on December 20, 2012
at 01:52 PM

If you do rice, brown rice flour might be worth looking into. I've used that in baking with great results.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on December 20, 2012
at 02:33 PM

This would be better than a wheat based product but I don't really want to use a grain but thanks.

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