1

votes

Fecal transplants are designed to change gut flora. Is there equivalent for skin too?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 27, 2013 at 4:18 AM

Fecal transplants change the dominant flora of an individual to a healthy one and as a consequence even difficult to eradicate hadmful bacteria die off.

I suffer chronic fungal rash and have tried all possible remedies, If I assume that the rash is caused by domination of wrong skin flora than transplanting good flora could help to restore the balance. Does such process exist? Any wild suggestions how would one do it DIY?

C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

(358)

on May 24, 2014
at 03:32 AM

Great article on the topic. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/magazine/my-no-soap-no-shampoo-bacteria-rich-hygiene-experiment.html?smid=pl-share&_r=0

5cb72179fcddcee6a6b570dc80269a1a

(78)

on May 25, 2013
at 08:49 PM

Man, this is an excellent question. Like the gut, I think skin is another place we should be looking to. It has it's own intelligence and besides the Vitamin D thing, I believe there is much more happening that we simply don't know about. Yet.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on March 28, 2013
at 04:29 PM

You didn't read his question well enough.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on March 27, 2013
at 08:49 PM

I have always felt that tanning beds are great for healthy skin in the short term. You can definitely tell. Obviously we all know that they can be abused to horrible ends.

C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

(358)

on March 27, 2013
at 06:11 PM

I do not sweat at all. I have seen improvement after sauna but was not sure if this is linked

5bd7f43c7da83282bcb78e3aa33832e0

(266)

on March 27, 2013
at 06:05 AM

Very interesting question. I've long considered 'skin lining' to be the other side of the coin from gut lining (they both have delicate, intricate systems for regulating what comes in, goes out, and what doesn't). I do all the normal things to improve my gut lining, including fermented foods, avoidance of wheat, etc., but what I do for my skin is just daily showers, exfoliation, sauna, bath with added salts, etc. These are important though. Do you sweat much or exfoliate? These are Skin Health 101

5bd7f43c7da83282bcb78e3aa33832e0

(266)

on March 27, 2013
at 06:03 AM

Very interesting question. I've long considered 'skin lining' to be the other side of the coin from gut lining. I do all the normal things to improve my gut lining, including fermented foods, avoidance of wheat, etc., but what I do for my skin is just daily showers, exfoliation, sauna, bath with added salts, etc. These are important though. Do you sweat much or exfoliate? These are Skin Health 101

  • C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

    asked by

    (358)
  • Views
    1.9K
  • Last Activity
    1427D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

1
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on March 27, 2013
at 08:46 PM

I've wondered about probiotic skin treatments for years. Never really found anything. Dermatologists have just told me 'it doesn't work that way' which is basically their way of saying 'doesn't sound profitable, I'm sure I could care less'.

Your best bet is working on your skin's integrity.

Get environmental allergy testing, isolate likely food allergies, moisturize, supplement or target your diet toward nutrients that promote healthy skin...

C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

(358)

on May 24, 2014
at 03:32 AM

Great article on the topic. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/magazine/my-no-soap-no-shampoo-bacteria-rich-hygiene-experiment.html?smid=pl-share&_r=0

1
0b73cdbd0cb68aeeda14dafeebb2f828

on March 27, 2013
at 08:24 PM

I'm sure we are all aware of the role of UVB in producing Vitamin D3 and the actions of Vitamin D in upregulating anti-microbial peptides but there are other Beneficial effects of UV radiation other than via vitamin D production Including the actions of UVA which combined will, providing you have frequent, non burning, full body, UV exposure improve the microbiome on the surface of your skin.

May I suggest to you and anyone hoping to spend time sunbathing in the summer that you allow plenty of time starting now, to improve your skin's natural photo-protection. 12~20 weeks intensive work improving natural anti-inflammatory status will make a huge difference.

Generally Vitamin D3 needs to be at/above 125nmol/l 50ng/ml Omega 3 up Omega 6 down magnesium and melatonin up.

Useful evidence based suggestions here

Natural Sunscreen Options - Healthy Fellow

Eat Your Sunscreen? - Wellness Mama

You can also work at improving your gut flora and that will impact on skin condition. See this paper. Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future?

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on March 27, 2013
at 08:49 PM

I have always felt that tanning beds are great for healthy skin in the short term. You can definitely tell. Obviously we all know that they can be abused to horrible ends.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 24, 2014
at 12:19 PM

Eat some foods rich in copper. A lot of skin issues track back to that.

0
B948df5342567842040b1e06e6f822f3

on March 28, 2013
at 05:51 AM

I'm researching FT for UC, and it's well documented the positive affects on C.Diff. You can def. do yourself if you wanted to. Here are some sites I've discovered in my short research of a few days

http://fecaltransplant.org/

http://www.fecalmicrobiotatransplantation.com/FMT/home.html

http://thepowerofpoo.blogspot.com/

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on March 28, 2013
at 04:29 PM

You didn't read his question well enough.

0
537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on March 27, 2013
at 08:54 PM

I have been putting home made kefir on my face as a mask during my epsom salt baths

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on March 27, 2013
at 08:45 PM

You could try consistently changing ph. An easy way to do this is diluted vinegar.
Mileage does vary on this one. Some of these things won't grow anymore due to the change in ph, but they may learn to put up with it over time, or not even be bothered by it. The other annoying thing is that it can work well, and then you forget to do it for a while and it comes back.

Theoretically, you could try want you want to do on yourself. Presumably you have some areas of skin where you don't have the rash. You could scrape healthy skin and put it on the rash. You'd probably need a bandage to keep it on. This is an interesting idea- but whatever you do, don't hurt yourself- on either of these ideas. You don't want the vinegar to burn, nor do you want to scrape so hard that you hurt your skin.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!