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Gymnastic Strength Training

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 13, 2010 at 8:19 PM

I have been researching and practicing gymnastic training techniques, some of which are inspired by Coach Sommer and Ido Portal. It seems that this type of training and exercise really develops full controlof one's body, and there are some examples on Coach Sommer's website that show that gymnastic bodyweight training has made many achieve results in lifting and other forms of training that are remarkable, and all without the use of added weight. Gymnastics might not be as old as rock or spear throwing, but it sure seems like a scientifically superior strength training form when compared with most. Anyone want to compare the similarities of gymnastic or bodyweight training to paleolithic lifestyle approaches, have any good training reccomendations that go against or with gymnastic principles, or any other informed information on this topic?

Fe198e0c02edd407cdf8c83c0fceaea1

(753)

on October 15, 2010
at 09:38 PM

Also, can't remember where I came across this but I've been doing it and it seems to be beneficial: when doing pullups, on the last rep of each set descend extremely slowly, as slow as you possibly can, as this causes intense contractions and helps strengthen the neurological pathways associated with the movement.

Fe198e0c02edd407cdf8c83c0fceaea1

(753)

on October 14, 2010
at 03:43 PM

I've just been following the advice from his site, though I'd be interested to get the book. Haven't checked out Ido's blog yet, thanks for the tip.

Cacc89096bbbec20ff6904cbbd58e92d

(273)

on October 13, 2010
at 10:21 PM

Thanks Greta, do you use the planche progression from his site or from the book. I dont have the book yet, but know his articles are awesome. Ido Portal's exercises on his blog are great also.

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2 Answers

5
Fe198e0c02edd407cdf8c83c0fceaea1

(753)

on October 13, 2010
at 08:36 PM

Don't know how much I have to offer, but this post interested me as I have recently (about a month ago) began the planche progression training as outlined by coach Sommers, and have had amazing results. My abs exploded within a week and though progress is slow (I can hold a tuck planche for 30 seconds at a time), I am more than pleased with the strength and control I am developing. I find this translates well to any kind of excercise, be it bodyweight or weight training, or even just walking/running (barefoot of course)...core stability increases so fast with gymnastics training and it feels amazing to have such great control over the whole body. I think the real thing is that when doing static positions you engage tons of different muscles all over the body with extremely intense contractions and that gives you a better feel for the way the body works as a whole and how to better utilize it in its entirety rather than focusing on isolation. I've been working with dumb-bells, basically just moving around and exploring my range of motion with some weight in my hands -- and you end up using so many more muscle groups, especially the core, than you'd think, which has resulted in a more overall muscle tone and adaptability to different situations. I find bodyweight stuff to be the most helpful, as most gymnastics stuff is bodyweight oriented. I do lots of pushups and am a stickler for perfect form, which really promotes much better returns. Pull ups are great also, and making sure to get outside and move around on unpredictable terrain to really augment what you get from the gymnastics stuff. I like to run around on rocks and boulders as the scale of decision making (where to put your foot next, as you continuously move) is so short and engages the mind, and this has really helped me with balance and movement with total body awareness. Hope that is interesting.

Cacc89096bbbec20ff6904cbbd58e92d

(273)

on October 13, 2010
at 10:21 PM

Thanks Greta, do you use the planche progression from his site or from the book. I dont have the book yet, but know his articles are awesome. Ido Portal's exercises on his blog are great also.

Fe198e0c02edd407cdf8c83c0fceaea1

(753)

on October 14, 2010
at 03:43 PM

I've just been following the advice from his site, though I'd be interested to get the book. Haven't checked out Ido's blog yet, thanks for the tip.

Fe198e0c02edd407cdf8c83c0fceaea1

(753)

on October 15, 2010
at 09:38 PM

Also, can't remember where I came across this but I've been doing it and it seems to be beneficial: when doing pullups, on the last rep of each set descend extremely slowly, as slow as you possibly can, as this causes intense contractions and helps strengthen the neurological pathways associated with the movement.

1
1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

on October 14, 2010
at 08:51 AM

I would definitely pick up Coach Sommer's book Building the Gymnastic Body if you haven't already - I'm also a big fan of Ido and have moved from powerlifting to more gymnastics-based training and feel great (the body was getting beaten up from powerlifting and health becomes more important as you get older!). I would also highly recommend seeking out some adult gymnastics coaching if you want to learn tumbling etc in a safe environment. You can also pick up gymnastic rings quite cheaply and combined with a suitable pullup bar or tree branch you can have a fantastic training programme.

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