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Great progress except for push ups

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 07, 2012 at 3:59 PM

I've been following the primal fitness blueprint for several months now and I've made great progress on pull ups, squats, sprinting and even planking but I've been stuck on push ups for a long time now. My arms are starting to look real nice and it's becoming obvious that my chest is falling behind.

I always do my workout in the same order.... Pulls, squats, push, plank

I'm wondering if moving push ups to the top of the order would help.

Any other suggestions? Has anyone else had similar issues?

3228f776e86815bf674a672fc312c4ff

(126)

on December 07, 2012
at 05:16 PM

I like the sound of this approach. I do 2 heavy lifting workouts per week an 1 sprint workout. I'll try adding a push up day at home once per week.

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8 Answers

1
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on December 07, 2012
at 04:08 PM

In my experience, the chest is definitely one of the most stubborn muscle groups. I've been focusing an entire workout on it 2-3 times a week. I set a goal to knock out 200 push ups in an hour, mostly sets of 20.

I do different variations... military, wide, perfect-push-ups, BOSU, incline, decline, clap... you get it... right?

I don't care if I need to finish on my knees (which does happen... for now...) I finish the 200. Best part is I can watch some tv, do the dishes, roast my coffee beans, whatever while I'm getting work in.

I have definitely seen improvement.

3228f776e86815bf674a672fc312c4ff

(126)

on December 07, 2012
at 05:16 PM

I like the sound of this approach. I do 2 heavy lifting workouts per week an 1 sprint workout. I'll try adding a push up day at home once per week.

1
86c97b2779feab3c330f5e1c5fea7e25

(2312)

on December 07, 2012
at 04:08 PM

If you have access to a gym, add in some bench press. That made the biggest difference for me when trying to improve chest. I would assume it could be very helpful for push ups as well since you can start with less than your entire body weight.

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 08, 2012
at 10:34 PM

only thing that helps me with push-ups is doing them often and doing different variations. i do upper body exercises 2-3x a week and always do about 50 push ups in each workout. you can google these types:

dive bombers, staggered, wide arm, tricep, sliding, speed, side to side, pike, diamond, reptile

it makes your workout a lot more interesting if you keep adding in different types. i started doing wall pushups and progressed to the floor on my knees. you just gotta keep working at it.

0
B7e1ad6bb9ab814b8e90bdad4a472d5e

on December 08, 2012
at 06:05 PM

sound like you don't have a good "hollow back" when you do a pushup pull down on your scapula push your pecks together so your upper body is more tighter like you got a set of boobs. As you do the push up turn both hands anti clockwise as you go up. you will have to do close push up in order for this to work. you want to load up the shoulder be leaning forward. This will put more stress on you chest muscle.

notice how he leans forwards and keep his body tight try doing a push up like this

here is a great video showing what I am talking about
http://gymnasticswod.com/content/planche-progression-pt1 notice how he leans forwards and keep his body tight try doing a push up like this!

watch them all don't worry if you can't get your feet up the ground.

0
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on December 07, 2012
at 09:31 PM

Examine your pushup form to make sure you are engaging your chest. You mentioned that your arms are beginning to look real nice. It is possible that your triceps are "overpowering" your chest in the workout. I had a similar issue when I was younger where my triceps were more developed than my chest leading to the tricep being more dominant in the exercise. It's also common in the squat, with many people being more quad dominant instead of engaging their glutes and hamstrings.

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 07, 2012
at 06:09 PM

If you are going down the body-weight path, I would suggest looking through a heavy load, time-based routine.

The routine is essentially Push-ups, Dive-bomber Push-ups, Wide Armed Push-ups, and Diamond Pushups. Go through the group, Start with Push-ups, complete as many as you can in 90 seconds. Then rest 30s. Then move on to Dive-bomber and repeat. Do three sets.

0
Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on December 07, 2012
at 05:45 PM

You could try this program. It is basically a progression program that gets you to 100 consecutive push ups in about 7 weeks.

http://hundredpushups.com/

I haven't done it, but know a couple people that have seen some good results with it.

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on December 07, 2012
at 04:31 PM

Many bodybuilder types recommend pushing lagging body parts both earlier in your workout and earlier in the week, when you're fresh and concentration has yet to subside. As for the efficacy I cannot vouch for it, as I am not a fan of bodybuilding style workouts (or Primal Fitness Blueprint for that matter), but I bet it works considering the balance that physique athletes train for. I'd just give it a shot and assess from there.

Also, if you're operating on an already glycogen depleted muscle (and isolation exercises are highly glycolytic), then simply adding in a some useable carbs (pre or post workout for glycogen replenishment) could help you crank out some more reps.

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