2

votes

What is the best seafood?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 04, 2012 at 12:48 AM

Simple question..

What is the best seafood option?

By best consider price, potential toxins, and hard to come by nutrients such as EPA DHA and iodine.

Ive been buying wild sockeye salmon. Can I do better in this price range? Is there a reason sockeye is so much cheaper than king salmon

Thanks!

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

^ Theres probably more in the skin. That number is meat only, and as I understand it iodine actually concentrates in the skin of fish.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 04, 2012
at 04:44 PM

I am sure theres more iodine in salmon head and roe than in the meat. Just buy those too once a while. Like one should buy offal.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 04, 2012
at 01:19 AM

Iodine isnt hard to come by, unless your local soil is mineral depleted. Its high in eggs, dairy/cheese, coconuts and cranberries.

  • 32937bdb4caf053e7aa39693fadd2282

    asked by

    (547)
  • Views
    5.5K
  • Last Activity
    1280D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

5
C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on September 04, 2012
at 01:24 AM

Sardines IMO. They're wild & cheap (Kind of like my 1st girlfriend). The canned varieties are found at pretty much any local corner store (AVOID THE SOY OIL BRANDS). They're lower in the food chain which makes them less susceptible to Mercury. High PRO & Fat. One can is roughly around 1-3g Omega 3.

3
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 04, 2012
at 01:24 AM

I think green-lipped mussels aint a bad source of DHA/EPA. Not as good as salmon but cheaper where I live. Sardines are a great source of fish fats, and you can get em cheap as in tins. (Of course tins have bpa)

I imagine both of these would be low in mercury.

Of course IMO salmon tastes better than sardines, but green-lipped mussels are pretty tasty. Then again you may like sardines.

If your after iodine, salmon often isnt the best source, because its a semi-fresh water fish (which conversely helps with mercury). The salmon i researched had only about 12.5 micrograms for 250grams. I imagine it can get higher, but generally speaking thats lower than cheese, coconuts, eggs and cranberry.

But iodine isnt that hard to come by as a nutrient, you can get plenty from eggs (eggs have about 28 mcgs or more - each), dairy (hard cheese has about 90mcg per 100grams of cheese, if you do dairy, and especially eat cheese, your golden), coconuts (IDK how much, but coconuts are supposed to be loaded with iodine) or cranberries (same as coconuts, cranberries have heaps of iodine).

You only need 150mcgs a day as well, and given theres variable amount in basically everything (meats and veg -content depending on feed/soil content. As an example 100 grams of meat has roughly 10-30mcgs, dependng on soil/feed, most proper veg is much the same), the odd bit of either salt water fish, or the above land foods will cover ya totally.

I imagine people who are iodine deficient are merely not eating a healthy diet, rather than not eating seafood. It was an epidemic in the depression, and is probably effected by a high wheat/grain intake, seeing as it seems according to my extensive research pretty easy to get your rda if your eating paleo (ie whole foods)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 04, 2012
at 04:44 PM

I am sure theres more iodine in salmon head and roe than in the meat. Just buy those too once a while. Like one should buy offal.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

^ Theres probably more in the skin. That number is meat only, and as I understand it iodine actually concentrates in the skin of fish.

1
B9053e173d69df9a9141c4e23c2de678

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 11:59 AM

I am a cod and wild salmon fan. Haddock also has merit for taste, protein content and lower toxicity. Pacific cod runs a better chance of not falling into the "overfished" category, though neither cod nor haddock are particularly high in omega 3s. Sardines are great but be aware that many brands are not careful with packaging and BPAs are an issue.

Mark Sisson takes a stab at answering this here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/grocery-store-seafood-what-to-eat-and-what-to-avoid/#axzz25QJQCCg3

0
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 04, 2012
at 09:02 PM

Sockeye is so tasty, but yeah, it's spendy. I'd say just have a large variety of it. Try to limit those fish that are long-lived and large, like tuna. They've had more time to concentrate toxins. Shorter lived and smaller ones like salmon, sardines have less toxins for this reason. Some people say to avoid filter feeders like shellfish, but they have lots of minerals and vitamins. So I would just make sure to change it up often and not dwell too long on any one kind.

0
7296570c2094f073260067dae5e79133

on September 04, 2012
at 08:31 AM

Shellfish...this is a very good guide http://jackkruse.com/brain-gut-6-epi-paleo-rx/

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!