1

votes

Parasites in fish?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 22, 2011 at 1:44 PM

I explored Durianriders facebook. One facebook user reported that she ocassionally consume fish as sashimi and that she feel better after this. Harley respond very sorrowful, very kind. Maybe he changed a bit since the Healthdebate with richard from freetheanimal. I realy like the debate. I also like the last video of durianrider he seems more grounded and clear for now.

Get yourself reguarly tested for methyl-mercury poisoning as its a genuine reality in todays tuna market. When ever we try and starve oursselves of plants, the body will 100% of the time go to more caloric rich foods to get some calories. People blame plants for not getting enough cals but its the fad diet that they follow that is to really blame.

Also be careful with fish tape worm. They can grow big and give the 'bloated gut' look in really slim people. Fish tapeworm also competes for b12 in our body. So you are best cooking it but then you get no b12 and style have methy mercury to worry about. Sounds stressful lol! ;)"about. Sounds stressful lol! ;)"

he respond with this words. He worries that people getting parasites or mercurry poisoning. Thats kind behaviour in mey eyes. What do you think on parasites? Do you go fishing? How do you protect oyurself against parasites? Where is it safest to fish? What fish has to be cooked? How to pretect against parasites? Have you had a fish tape worm?

And what do you think on the advices of this site. It looks professional. http://www.charkbait.com/article/RAPC2.htm

Is there a different between fresh and marine water fish?

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on April 22, 2011
at 11:12 PM

I didn't search pubmed or anything, but I did do a quick search a few weeks ago to find out if b12 is heat stable- supposedly it's pretty stable. A little may be lost in cooking, but not much.

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 22, 2011
at 06:59 PM

If cooking reduced b12 almost everyone in the US would be deficient. Instead only strict vegans are. So yeah.... someone is blowing smoke.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:45 PM

It could be, but the parasites are endemic to those salmon found in the sea as well.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Salmon could technically be classified as a freshwater fish as well though, Jay.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 22, 2011
at 04:04 PM

most sushi salmon is frozen for this reason.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 22, 2011
at 04:03 PM

Totally false. Raw wild salmon are infected with parasites in epidemic proportions. Sushi-grade salmon has been frozen at low enough temps for long enough to kill the parasites. You would be very ill advised to buy fresh salmon and eat it raw.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 22, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I should add that nobody here its fresh water fish raw. Its usually briefly fried in butter or turned into soup. I would trust the local traditions.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 22, 2011
at 02:29 PM

hej, the b12 myth is not sourced deeper. I actually snap this quate from durianriders facebook site. Its a next unanswered hack? Does cooking reduces B12? thanks for your answer

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5 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(12379)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:02 PM

Sushi grade fish must be blast frozen at sea to -40 celcius in order to be served in a restaurant.

I worked on commercial gill-net's (fishing for salmon) for 2 summers, and studied coastal resource management and I have never heard of a fish tape worm nor any other dangerous parasites that would be in the salmon. I have seen sea lice - but the are on the outside of the fish and are quite large (you would never eat one).

I have eaten fresh caught salmon in a variety of manners (including raw) and I have never been ill.

I would advise differently when it comes to bottom fish like halibut though. You can see organisms living in the flesh when you filet the fresh fish - so halibut I would definitely cook. Don't worry though - if you are not fishing for halibut yourself, it is very rare to get it fresh wild, as most commercial boat blast freeze halibut to -40 at sea.

0
9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on April 22, 2011
at 03:27 PM

There is very little danger of parasitic infections from raw, salt-water fish. The parasites that are sometimes found in salt water fish did not evolve to infect humans. Fresh water fish is very dangerous when under-cooked, however, as the life cycle of many of the parasites found in fresh water fish involves a stage of life infecting a mammal.

The safety of salt-water fish varies by species. I think I have heard that swordfish can carry worms that can infect humans. Maybe that's why you don't see swordfish on the menu at Sushi restaurants.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 22, 2011
at 04:03 PM

Totally false. Raw wild salmon are infected with parasites in epidemic proportions. Sushi-grade salmon has been frozen at low enough temps for long enough to kill the parasites. You would be very ill advised to buy fresh salmon and eat it raw.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Salmon could technically be classified as a freshwater fish as well though, Jay.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:45 PM

It could be, but the parasites are endemic to those salmon found in the sea as well.

0
9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on April 22, 2011
at 03:20 PM

About the only fish I eat raw or rare is tuna. I took a sushi class years ago and learned quite a bit about fish safety. The chef showed us how to properly prepare raw salmon for sushi or sashimi. You have to soak it in an acid to 'cook' the outside of the filet, where parasites are more likely to be (think ceviche). You then slice away the outside to reveal the safer raw portion. I have no interest in raw salmon now.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 22, 2011
at 04:04 PM

most sushi salmon is frozen for this reason.

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 22, 2011
at 02:28 PM

I see plenty of bugs and stuff in my salad greens, but i am not worried about it. Been eating raw local fresh fish (salmon and baltic whitefish) since kid, and with no ill effects. Its lightly salted tho. I have never eaten tuna, its not fresh here.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 22, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I should add that nobody here its fresh water fish raw. Its usually briefly fried in butter or turned into soup. I would trust the local traditions.

0
17f10869e0e20327c997a012499c3ed4

on April 22, 2011
at 02:08 PM

Personally, I never eat raw or undercooked fish. Even if there is only a slight risk of parasites, it's more of a risk than I care to take. Also, where did you here that cooking fish eleminates vitamin B12? This is the first I've heard that, but I'll be sure to check it out. Thanks for the post!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 22, 2011
at 02:29 PM

hej, the b12 myth is not sourced deeper. I actually snap this quate from durianriders facebook site. Its a next unanswered hack? Does cooking reduces B12? thanks for your answer

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 22, 2011
at 06:59 PM

If cooking reduced b12 almost everyone in the US would be deficient. Instead only strict vegans are. So yeah.... someone is blowing smoke.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on April 22, 2011
at 11:12 PM

I didn't search pubmed or anything, but I did do a quick search a few weeks ago to find out if b12 is heat stable- supposedly it's pretty stable. A little may be lost in cooking, but not much.

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