1

votes

Oily fish. How often?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 18, 2013 at 7:03 AM

How often would you say it's okay to eat oily fish? A site i was looking at recommended 4 portions a week for men and unlimited on white fish. I probably eat 3 or 4 a week so guessing i'm safe according to CW. I can't get enough of the stuff, i'd replace some meats permanently and eat it if i could afford it. I'm sure cavemen were eating tons of it.

What's your take?

Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158

(529)

on July 21, 2013
at 12:36 AM

That's an interesting conclusion. I've always thought that the original human diet would be rich in seafood (including shellfish and sea vegetables), and therefore closer to the ideal diet.

C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on July 20, 2013
at 07:30 AM

This isn't so much about food quantity in general. But thanks for the comment anyway :) (i upvoted as i agree with that in general)

C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on July 18, 2013
at 08:12 PM

1) I'm getting O3 without supplements 2) http://medcitynews.com/2013/07/the-omega-3prostate-cancer-media-fiesta-mistaking-correlation-for-causation-puts-patients-at-risk/ this is worth a read :)

C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on July 18, 2013
at 05:45 PM

Nice one, cheers :) just gutted a load of herring i got from the market and can't wait scoff it :D

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 18, 2013
at 05:19 PM

Important to note that the study used fish oil pills and not whole fish. Might be the same with whole fish, but no way to tell from the study (and that's assuming the study's findings are actually born out. Been several topics on PaleoHacks already looking at whether we should be worrying about the study's findings.)

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10 Answers

4
4cef120270c742b7f0094b05c617636f

on July 18, 2013
at 10:56 AM

As much as possible is my take.

Good fish doesn't have hormones, antibiotics and other crap and it doesn't eat grains either. Pretty sure I saw a post here the other day saying that mercury isn't much of a concern either for most types of fish.

Nothing beats the taste of salmon and I try to eat as much of it as I can, that and kangaroo meat. I don't eat canned fish and canned things in general due to BPA.

C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on July 18, 2013
at 05:45 PM

Nice one, cheers :) just gutted a load of herring i got from the market and can't wait scoff it :D

1
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 20, 2013
at 02:37 AM

I've been eating upwards of 2 servings of oily fish a day. Yes, you read that right.

I feel great.

1
63075669c2ec8cb6dab906c334c9b911

on July 19, 2013
at 09:08 PM

Tinned mackerel is cheap, at least where I buy it. Atlantic mackerel is a good option with low mercury levels. I eat mackerel roughly every two days which is about 1g per day worth of additional omega-3. I'd say replace the omega-3 supplements with more oily fish where possible. I'm quite happy leaving it at a tin of mackerel every two days.

1
De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

on July 19, 2013
at 06:48 PM

I feel great eating oily fish & eat a lot of canned sardines/mackerel, i feel i could live off them happily, but i do acknowledge i need to mix it up with some different sea foods, im going to start getting more frozen fish as its cheaper (and i guess i could eat it raw too which i find very appealing) and eat more shellfish

I too feel i could replace most meats with seafood & actually did for a few years, but i wasn't eating nearly enough protein during that time so can't comment whether lots of fish is optimal for myself, i reckon it probably is though as im intuitively drawn like a magnet to swimming in the ocean

I don't think there's any better food than when i eat some fish after swimming a lot

I just realized that i have to live by the sea & should seriously make plans to move in the next few years, cheers!

1
5c13e90ae8f9cf923a7c83630c5adee4

on July 18, 2013
at 11:35 PM

You should eat so much food as you want. your body will tell you when to stop.

C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on July 20, 2013
at 07:30 AM

This isn't so much about food quantity in general. But thanks for the comment anyway :) (i upvoted as i agree with that in general)

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 18, 2013
at 12:44 PM

No upper limit, as long as you're getting adequate omega-6 fats in your diet.

1
C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

on July 18, 2013
at 12:39 PM

Recommended intake of O3 per week is 3g, which is about 12oz of wild salmon or three tins of sardines. You'll definitely be fine with up to 6g a week (at least in my opinion) and that may even be beneficial, but keep in mind that O3 fats are polyunsaturated and thus can be oxidized just like O6 fats, so don't go popping fish oil pills like crazy. Sticking to oily fish though, you should be fine eating as much as you'd like throughout the week.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on July 19, 2013
at 05:01 PM

Mercury in mackerel, sardines, herrings and anchovies is the lowest of any fish, I will always eat them above any other fish if given a choice. I do agree with the Omega 3 concerns. Why should only O6 be inflammatory? It is very possible, even likely, that excesses of PUFA are damaging to your health, regardless of composition. Wild ruminants have fat compositions of roughly 5/45/50 PUFA, MUFA and SFA. I would stick close to that ratio, that computes (for me at least) to 3 to 5 grams of PUFA a day, more in winter less in summer, and therefore 1 to 2 grams of O3 per day (which is higher than some numbers above). I have really come to the conclusion that a diet based on land animals is superior to a diet rich in fish, so long as you eat no grains. Reduction of O6 is as important as increase of O3 in getting to a balanced diet.

Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158

(529)

on July 21, 2013
at 12:36 AM

That's an interesting conclusion. I've always thought that the original human diet would be rich in seafood (including shellfish and sea vegetables), and therefore closer to the ideal diet.

0
736662d9fd6314d426cc6de1896aa045

(175)

on July 18, 2013
at 05:27 PM

Jaminet recommended 1 lb of fish per week, while recognising potential problems with excess omega 3 - the latest report on male prostate cancer adds fuel to the speculation.

I think Jaminet has now come down to 2 portions of fish, and I think that doesn't specify oily fish.

I eat two grilled salmon fillets and try to get one shellfish chowder for iodine. Preparing and freezing the chowder base is my downfall!

0
235e74b9adb57eff80592f064e1d298b

on July 18, 2013
at 04:45 PM

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/52453451/ns/local_news-charleston_sc/t/your-health-study-fish-oil-supplements-raise-prostate-cancer/ You may want read this article before you go jumping into a fish fest. Omega-3 is great but too much could be an issue.

C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on July 18, 2013
at 08:12 PM

1) I'm getting O3 without supplements 2) http://medcitynews.com/2013/07/the-omega-3prostate-cancer-media-fiesta-mistaking-correlation-for-causation-puts-patients-at-risk/ this is worth a read :)

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 18, 2013
at 05:19 PM

Important to note that the study used fish oil pills and not whole fish. Might be the same with whole fish, but no way to tell from the study (and that's assuming the study's findings are actually born out. Been several topics on PaleoHacks already looking at whether we should be worrying about the study's findings.)

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