3

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How bad Is fish that is farmed in the sea?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 01, 2011 at 7:21 AM

I want to get more fish into my diet, but I'm not big expert on fish and nobody else eats it in my house. I thought that smoked fish was an easy solution and as a bonus, it needs no preparation.

I bought some delicious smoked mackerel. The labelling didn't say if it was farmed, so I called the company to ask. They said it was from Norway (I think) and that it was farmed in the sea, not in fish farms. I asked what the fish eat but they couldn't tell me.

Clearly this isn't ideal, but is it really bad?

Medium avatar

(3029)

on January 03, 2011
at 06:09 AM

As committed as I am to eating healthy, I'm not quite yet ready to hop on a plane and check out my mackarel producer :)

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on January 01, 2011
at 08:27 PM

I only know about oysters. "Farming" is usually done either by seeding existing beds or putting spat in bags (they look a little like mesh laundry bags) and letting them grow. I prefer this method since it is less disruptive or restores the beds.

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5 Answers

2
543ffa0194aea9365f7be764aa112356

(115)

on January 03, 2011
at 12:59 AM

its really bad, its dosed with antibiotics, is often infested with sea lice and other parasites, and is terrible for the environment because the confined cages are filled with thousands of pooping fish in an environment not meant for only a few. Farming is for some reason worse in the Atlantic in than in the pacific but its still all bad. farmed salmon is terrible for you, avoid it as best you can. buy wild caught sustainable fish i you can.

2
0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on January 01, 2011
at 12:14 PM

Given that mackerels are predators, it is highly likely that they are fed a diet consisting of fish meal and fish oil. Most of the world production of fishmeal and fish oil is used for fish farming. In Norway toxins in farmed salmon is closely monitored and is likely monitored in other farmed fish too...

http://www.bellona.org/aquaculture/tema_aquaculture/Food_safety

0
1a0b41e5fb2c10830b59f1b8b36cef2b

on January 03, 2011
at 12:53 AM

I highly recommend you check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

They provide a fish by fish analysis and provide recommendations based on environmental and health factors. It is a must-use resource for anyone that wants to be healthy and do the right thing at the same time.

I have the iphone app as well.

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/sfw_recommendations.aspx

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 01, 2011
at 03:06 PM

I watched a video on you tube on farmed salmon. Theres a big industry in Norway and North America. By looking for this again there are more media on this topic. like this. http://www.farmedsalmonexposed.org/

.....

i heard good things on some organic farmed raised fish. Have a close look how they are living. Look video or visit the farmed. It can be labelled. By visisting the producer you ll learn something more.

Medium avatar

(3029)

on January 03, 2011
at 06:09 AM

As committed as I am to eating healthy, I'm not quite yet ready to hop on a plane and check out my mackarel producer :)

0
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on January 01, 2011
at 01:08 PM

This does bring up a good question. There are many "sea" farms for fish and shellfish and I wonder what negative aspects there are. I would imagine they are feeding off of natural habitat, just confined to a specific area.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on January 01, 2011
at 08:27 PM

I only know about oysters. "Farming" is usually done either by seeding existing beds or putting spat in bags (they look a little like mesh laundry bags) and letting them grow. I prefer this method since it is less disruptive or restores the beds.

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