4

votes

Have any of you voracious fish-eaters been diagnosed with high mercury levels?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 08, 2012 at 11:20 AM

Have any of you voracious fish-eaters been diagnosed with high mercury levels?

Did you go in for a regular checkup and this diagnosis was a big surprise?

Or did a particular ailment bring you into the doctor?

Did you get treated?

What treatment?

Was there a certain fish you think might have been the primary culprit?

Do you still eat fish?

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 09, 2012
at 12:38 AM

Allow me to clarify. I eat small fish what don't eat other fish. There are some very very tiny mackerel in the tins I buy -- food for me and for larger mackerel, which I do not eat. It's my rule of thumb against all the conflicting "data" out there about mercury levels in this and that species, and whether or not the mercury danger is over- or understated. Really, I try not to overthink all this too much. I eat a *lot* of fish, and I don't have mercury issues, and that's my guideline. Which I think is in the spirit of the poster's question.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on November 09, 2012
at 12:22 AM

That's really informative, thanks for sharing it. Figure 2, showing the mean and max levels of Hg per type of fish, is really interesting.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on November 08, 2012
at 11:33 PM

The selenium argument may not be all that it's been cracked up to be. See this article: http://suppversity.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/mercury-in-fish-not-harmless-regardless.html

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on November 08, 2012
at 05:58 PM

Where are you getting your information about mercury levels? Wild salmon is actually very low in mercury. What kind of mackerel? If it is canned, be careful..it can be on the HIGH end of mercury ppm

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 08, 2012
at 04:17 PM

Absolutely. There's a lot to say about fish and mercury concerns that falls outside the scope of the question asked.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on November 08, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Mercury could be an issue for people with methylation cycle blocks: people prone to autism and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  • Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

    asked by

    (432)
  • Views
    1.3K
  • Last Activity
    1280D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

3
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on November 08, 2012
at 03:42 PM

I eat a lot of fish and I have high mercury (and lead) levels. However, I have a number of genetic defects in my methylation cycle metabolism, so the reduced ability to methylate mercury and detoxify it "explains away" the high levels of mercury. While shark, swordfish, and whale are problematic, and some lake fishes (depending on the selenium content of the lake), most people wouldn't have a problem with most fish, because fish usually contains more selenium than mercury. This podcast from Chris Kresser (and mentioned links) is a great resource: The Truth About Toxic Mercury in Fish. In particular, they discuss the Selenium Health Benefit Value, which takes into consideration how much more selenium to mercury there is in a fish. If there's more selenium than mercury, you're fine, because the selenium binds to the mercury, and you get a net selenium intake.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on November 08, 2012
at 11:33 PM

The selenium argument may not be all that it's been cracked up to be. See this article: http://suppversity.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/mercury-in-fish-not-harmless-regardless.html

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on November 09, 2012
at 12:22 AM

That's really informative, thanks for sharing it. Figure 2, showing the mean and max levels of Hg per type of fish, is really interesting.

0
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on November 08, 2012
at 01:16 PM

No, never had mercury issues or symptoms. I'm the same as Canis. I stick to small fish like sardines, herring, mackerel and occasional Salmon. I also eat a lot of shellfish.

0
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on November 08, 2012
at 12:34 PM

Nope. I stick to low-on-the-food-chain fish like sardines, trout, mackerel and herring -- keeping the tuna and salmon to an occasional treat. I don't eat shark, ever.

I've read (in Sally Fallon and elsewhere) that unless you're gestating, mercury shouldn't be an issue for anyone with healthy intestinal flora but I'm not finding any more rigorous science on that one.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 08, 2012
at 04:17 PM

Absolutely. There's a lot to say about fish and mercury concerns that falls outside the scope of the question asked.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on November 08, 2012
at 05:58 PM

Where are you getting your information about mercury levels? Wild salmon is actually very low in mercury. What kind of mackerel? If it is canned, be careful..it can be on the HIGH end of mercury ppm

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 09, 2012
at 12:38 AM

Allow me to clarify. I eat small fish what don't eat other fish. There are some very very tiny mackerel in the tins I buy -- food for me and for larger mackerel, which I do not eat. It's my rule of thumb against all the conflicting "data" out there about mercury levels in this and that species, and whether or not the mercury danger is over- or understated. Really, I try not to overthink all this too much. I eat a *lot* of fish, and I don't have mercury issues, and that's my guideline. Which I think is in the spirit of the poster's question.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on November 08, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Mercury could be an issue for people with methylation cycle blocks: people prone to autism and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!