2

votes

Did most/all paleolithic men and women eat seafood?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 12, 2010 at 8:20 AM

I really really dislike seafood, dabble in it anyway, and want to learn more about its history. Here is my unresearched hypothesis:

Maybe all paleo people didn't live by the sea, but everyone, including inland dwellers, had to drink water. Fish live in rivers and ponds. People clustered around water. Yadda yadda yadda.

Google won't give me a good answer, so I'm looking to the Borg collective here for some input. Here is what is hinging on the answer. I still get the lion's share of my omega 3 from fish oil. It's the only "supplement" I really need except vitamin D in the winter. If all of humanity was brought up on seafood, I would definitely consider eating it more than once a week. I recall that someone, maybe Melissa, posted a link somewhere about ancient water-dwelling and seafood eating, perhaps. Cough up the links again please, and any other relevant info.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 15, 2010
at 08:26 AM

Mark was a supplement expert long before he 'invented' Primal. It's his understanding of nutrition that lead his to broadening his understanding from supplementation to wider lifestyle changes. Purchasing his multivitamins is my way of showing support of his on-going effort and journey.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 15, 2010
at 01:44 AM

Ikco, I don't know how to upload files, but may try to figure it out. The spreadsheet spits out two result numbers: ratio and omega 6 load. The ratio is just an easier to understand interpretation of pufa intake.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 15, 2010
at 01:43 AM

Ah, I see. Mark writes some of the most clear and succinct articles, but I'm quite wary of his supplement biz. But if it allows him to write full time, great!

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 14, 2010
at 06:39 AM

Kamal, he gives away free Vital Omegas with every Damage Control Master Formula (multivitamin) autoshipment.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on September 13, 2010
at 07:09 PM

Ratio can be misleading, check walnuts. Spreadsheet upload ?

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 13, 2010
at 10:55 AM

When I was a kid I loved smoked fish (macarel,but it can be others, like herring or sardines) mashed and mixed with white cheese (made of natural milk, in the US they dont' really have it... it's more of an East European thing), or cream cheese. it makes delicious paste.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 04:45 AM

I may try to listen to my body better, but I'm not sure if it would tell me stuff or I would tell it stuff. There's so many nutrients and lifestyle confounders, pinning a symptom on one specific one is tough. Plus, half lives differ wildly. For now, my body tells me when it needs water, calories, sleep, and play. I suspect it might tell me about electrolytes too, but I've been wrong before.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 04:23 AM

Chris Masterjohn and friends say to keep all PUFAs as low as possible, Ray Peat says there's no essential fats, different people say different things. If I ate paleo as my taste buds wanted, my ratio would be around 10:1, which is better than before, but not great. Thus, supplementation to the tune of 1 teaspoon of fish oil on most days. If I start eating fish sometimes, or some anchovies and stuff like Kurt Harris, that might change.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 04:20 AM

What does one have to do to get Mark's omega capsules for free? Hmmm, don't answer that :( If you eat fish once a day, the whole ratio thing is pretty moot. I'm coming from the perspective of eating fish almost never.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 13, 2010
at 02:31 AM

I get Mark's omega capsules for free. I get cramps in my legs if I'm low on magnesium. You can learn to listen to your body. My moods are particularly swayed if I lack dietary fat, and I get fatigued without enough Vit D. Ratios - I said I limit my intake of chicken and pork. 5:1 is still a frakload better than the 20+:1 I used to eat. I eat lots of game. Plus, your 'stats' on pastured meats where you are may differ to Aussie figures. Every animal is different anyway. I try to eat fresh fish at least once a day, but it's hard in winter. Don't let the perfect ruin the good.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 02:06 AM

I've only had smoked salmon maybe once in my life, so that might be a good thing to try. Is there anything bad about smoked fish? I sort of am okay with crab too, but only sort of. That being said, I haven't really laid on as much butter as I'm capable of yet.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:48 AM

what about some other seafood? I dont' eat it, but I know people love many kinds of squids, oysters or crabs... dose smoking it change anything? smoked fish is slightly different in taste...

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:06 AM

Also, I've never heard of the freshwater fish ratio problem. When I look up freshwater fish on nutritiondata, they have quite similar fat profiles as saltwater fish. For example, freshwater bass has 600 mg omega 3 and 50 mg omega 6. Is there something that I'm missing?

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:05 AM

Yes, I'm thinking of getting myself a wifey who likes cooking fish!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 07:20 PM

Good question. I don't mind fish in coconut oil, but would never willingly choose that over some ground beef and eggs.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 12, 2010
at 07:09 PM

So @Kamal, why not just fry some fish in coconut oil if that is what appeals to your taste buds?

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 07:06 PM

To reiterate, paleo lines up my macro and micronutrients quite well with what evidence indicates we need. However, because I don't like seafood, I take a bit of fish oil as my only supplement other than some vitamin D in the winter. Because of its position as my only supplement, I wonder about how universal seafood was to our ancestors.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 07:03 PM

Chris- maybe I'm being dense, but what line of reasoning is that? From what I've read of Lands and Hibblen, they are simply emphasizing the importance of a good omega ratio. I'm asking if most/all paleo people ate seafood. Do they offer research on this type of thing? I had assumed they were mostly biochem types.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:48 PM

Uh have you read any of William Lands or Joseph Hibblen's research? This line of reasoning seems a bit absurd.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:26 PM

It's mostly the smell and taste. And texture. And maybe the look of it. And I never ate fish growing up. So in summary, everything. I've tried cooking fish occasionally, and end up using lots of butter and spice to make it taste okay. Before paleo, I did occasionally eat fried fish, which was delectable!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:05 PM

Hi Fearsclave--I am using omega ratios as a potential way to decrease systemic inflammation brought about by a genetic condition I have. Evolutionary logic involved things like offal, and replacing offal with other non-seafood foods/fats increases the ratio signficantly.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:02 PM

I see what you mean. I also "adapted" to eating more fat, even though before I couldn't stand any greasy foods. I guess a good technique is to begin by "sneaking in" the food - like making a goulash of fish with a lot of veggies you like. What is that about fish you don't like? Just the taste? or maybe the texture, the smell, the particular look of a species? Maybe if you found what it is, it would be easier to go around it.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 05:34 PM

Your answer doesn't address the penetration of fishing into varying paleolithic communities, which is what I'm interested in. There are a couple reasons to eat what you don't like, and avoid what you like. The most important is if a food is good for you or bad for you. My favorite foods center on bread and sugar, and I don't like steak or fish. I am hoping to adapt my tastes a little towards the latter foods, because they are good for me.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 05:10 PM

The first paragraph doesn't address the penetrable of fishing into varying paleolithic communities, which is what I'm interested in. There are a couple reasons to eat what you don't like, and avoid what you like. The most important is if a food is good for you or bad for you. My favorite foods center on bread and sugar, and I don't like steak or fish. I am hoping to adapt my tastes a little towards the latter foods, because they are good for me.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:59 AM

For example, I went to your blog, pulled a random recipe (chunky chicken burgers, looks yummy) and calculated the omega ratio as 5:1. That is with pasture eggs and free-range chicken. 5:1 is quite higher than the 1:1 or 2:1 ratio humans evolved on.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:53 AM

That omega 3 supplementation consensus is not a consensus. I've created a spreadsheet of the most commonly eaten foods by modern paleo/primal folks. Typical diets I see on diet logs end up being unbalanced, around 5:1 up to 12:1 omega ratio, despite being 100% primal and grass-fed. Why? Many reasons. Chicken, olive oil, etc is enough omega 6 to overwhelm your ratio. Even just eating grassfed beef will not help your ratio much. Now adding in some offal or game meat, that could help!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:51 AM

Also also, most people's bodies do not universally let them know if they need more of something. Is my body telling me to get more managanese and magnesium? No, but I'm currently low in that. My body tells me about water and dehydration, maybe a couple other things, but that's about it.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:49 AM

Also, god love Mark Sisson, but his fish oil pills are horrendously overpriced! They are more than twice as much as the other quality brands, that have been tested in that report from two years ago as being quite pure.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:45 AM

That omega 3 supplementation consensus is not a consensus. I've created a spreadsheet of the most commonly eaten foods by modern paleo/primal folks. Typical diets I see on diet logs end up being unbalanced, around 5:1 up to 12:1 omega ratio, despite being 100% primal and grass-fed. Why? Many reasons. Chicken, olive oil, and anything except for seafood, some grassfed beef/eggs/game meat has enough omega 6 to overwhelm your ratio.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:02 AM

I can't (yet) wrap my head around nomadic paleo groups and water. If they didn't have pipes and stuff, they had to have lakes/rivers/ponds/puddles nearby in order to obtain water, right? And all of those things, except puddles, contain fish.

2fd2b2346da1afd4cea4de40ed8480a0

(106)

on September 12, 2010
at 08:43 AM

probably not a universality since there were groups that were nomadic and followed the herds, but in all cases, they did eat meat in some way :)

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 08:23 AM

Also, I already know that humans have fished for a long time. What I want to know is if any evidence indicates the universiality of such practices.

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5 Answers

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:01 AM

Freshwater fish have a much less robust ratio of omega 3 to 6. Inland peoples probably ate as much freshwater fish as they could catch, but they would not have gotten nearly the same omega 3/6 ratio from it as those who ate certain saltwater fish. So no, I don't think inland peoples relied on fish for their omega profiles.

Also, I think that research still needs to prove that intake of omega 3 can cancel out intake of omega 6. I have yet to see research that differentiates the benefits of just eating less 6s to that of eating more 3s and less 6s. My point is, most benefits may be due to simply decreasing levels of 6s overall. Also, people taking fish pills and eating SAD may benefit simply becuase they don't have enough fat in their diets in the first place. Jury is still out, IMO, over how beneficial it is to eat lots of fish oil if you are already eating a healthy diet otherwise. Certainly, I have heard of some people feeling really sick after eating lots of fish oil pills. And most people not noticing any obvious changes at all.

Also, could be simply that omega 6 containing foods might be unhealthy for other reasons besides their 6 content. The amount of 6 may not be the main point. Those who eat very little 6 also happen to be those who eat whole natural foods, limit grains, etc. The prob with epidemiological studies is that they can't show causation. We only know that omega 6 intake seems to be CORRELATED with various problems. We don't yet know how much the 6 is directly responsible vs other crappy parts of those same foods that contain the 6s.

Sooo, I think the jury is still out on the benefits of sea fish oil intake. Certainly, many populatoins have been very healthy without any seafood at all, just freshwater fish, so sea fish are not a requirement of healthy living. How much sea fish might contribute is, IMO, still up for debate and I will keep a skeptical and observant eye as research continues..

Also, my advice for learning to like fish, get yourself a fresh caught fish like righ toff the dock and still flipping, no more than a day old. Those kind taste WAY WAY WAY better and are not stinky. Then have someone else prep it for you so your brain does not scream FISH when you look at it. Fresh fish is at least twice as good and way less fishy than the kinda old fish from the average grocery store. I am a bit lackluster on fish myself, but when I ate a fresh caught bass cooked in nothing but butter, I found myself guzzling it down with incredible gusto. It was a very different experience when it was fresh.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:05 AM

Yes, I'm thinking of getting myself a wifey who likes cooking fish!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:06 AM

Also, I've never heard of the freshwater fish ratio problem. When I look up freshwater fish on nutritiondata, they have quite similar fat profiles as saltwater fish. For example, freshwater bass has 600 mg omega 3 and 50 mg omega 6. Is there something that I'm missing?

1
Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

on September 12, 2010
at 12:10 PM

Those who could eat seafood usually did. There are shell middens meters deep, built up over millenia, that are evidence of multigenerational use of seafood resources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midden#Shell_middens

I really wouldn't worry too hard about the omega ratio thing. That way lies orthorexia. Nutritionists haven't got it right yet, and IMHO, just following evolutionary logic and sticking to quality food is going to be safer than messing around with whatever the theory du jour dictates...

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:05 PM

Hi Fearsclave--I am using omega ratios as a potential way to decrease systemic inflammation brought about by a genetic condition I have. Evolutionary logic involved things like offal, and replacing offal with other non-seafood foods/fats increases the ratio signficantly.

0
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on September 12, 2010
at 04:33 PM

Inland peoples obtain iodine from eating thyroids and omega 3s from eating brains. The omega 3s in brain are probably a better source than seafood because they have more DHA and less EPA. Living off seafood can be problematic because of the high protein to fat ratio. Most seafood is above the protein ceiling which means that seafood had to be supplemented with carbs or fat. Cordain wrote a paper on this issue.

0
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on September 12, 2010
at 02:23 PM

the people were always getting whatever was the easiest to obtain, cost the least of energy and time, and was least risky/dangerous. gathering shells, fishing for small fish in shallow bays, rivers or lakes was simply easy way to get the food. Similarly to finding insects, eggs, worms and whatever isn't too fast or dangerous...

But, we are modern people and our way is "modern" paleo... Which means we don't have to force ourselves to eat a particular thing or otherwise we would starve or be simply stupid survival-wise... We can pick and choose, use our knowledge and all the available resources.

If you don't like sea food - don't eat it. You have enough knowledge about what you eat, what you need, what are the required ratios etc, so I would supplement. Grab good quality fish oil or similar and pretend that's the water-food our ancestors used to eat.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 07:20 PM

Good question. I don't mind fish in coconut oil, but would never willingly choose that over some ground beef and eggs.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:26 PM

It's mostly the smell and taste. And texture. And maybe the look of it. And I never ate fish growing up. So in summary, everything. I've tried cooking fish occasionally, and end up using lots of butter and spice to make it taste okay. Before paleo, I did occasionally eat fried fish, which was delectable!

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 13, 2010
at 10:55 AM

When I was a kid I loved smoked fish (macarel,but it can be others, like herring or sardines) mashed and mixed with white cheese (made of natural milk, in the US they dont' really have it... it's more of an East European thing), or cream cheese. it makes delicious paste.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:02 PM

I see what you mean. I also "adapted" to eating more fat, even though before I couldn't stand any greasy foods. I guess a good technique is to begin by "sneaking in" the food - like making a goulash of fish with a lot of veggies you like. What is that about fish you don't like? Just the taste? or maybe the texture, the smell, the particular look of a species? Maybe if you found what it is, it would be easier to go around it.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 02:06 AM

I've only had smoked salmon maybe once in my life, so that might be a good thing to try. Is there anything bad about smoked fish? I sort of am okay with crab too, but only sort of. That being said, I haven't really laid on as much butter as I'm capable of yet.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 05:34 PM

Your answer doesn't address the penetration of fishing into varying paleolithic communities, which is what I'm interested in. There are a couple reasons to eat what you don't like, and avoid what you like. The most important is if a food is good for you or bad for you. My favorite foods center on bread and sugar, and I don't like steak or fish. I am hoping to adapt my tastes a little towards the latter foods, because they are good for me.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 13, 2010
at 01:48 AM

what about some other seafood? I dont' eat it, but I know people love many kinds of squids, oysters or crabs... dose smoking it change anything? smoked fish is slightly different in taste...

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 05:10 PM

The first paragraph doesn't address the penetrable of fishing into varying paleolithic communities, which is what I'm interested in. There are a couple reasons to eat what you don't like, and avoid what you like. The most important is if a food is good for you or bad for you. My favorite foods center on bread and sugar, and I don't like steak or fish. I am hoping to adapt my tastes a little towards the latter foods, because they are good for me.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 12, 2010
at 07:09 PM

So @Kamal, why not just fry some fish in coconut oil if that is what appeals to your taste buds?

0
1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 12, 2010
at 09:39 AM

I'll have to go link-hunting when my computer isn't throwing a hissy back-up fit, but I know that in Australia the original humans (Indigenous Australians/Aborigines) lived primarily in coastal regions. It wasn't until the British colonists arrived that the native people were forced inland en-masse. This isn't to say that they ate mainly seafood, it just indicates that most life needs water to thrive, so the land animals as well as sea animals would have been best sourced near open water. Australia does have lakes and rivers, but much of the mainland is seemingly-barren desert (despite it being anything but when you look at the ecosystem).

I've caught fish in the sea and in rivers with my bare hands. It's harder to find and catch most native land animals here, especially if you're operating on your own and without sophisticated weapons.

As for omega-3, it tends to be the consensus that supplementation is not needed if you're eating paleo and avoiding conventionally farmed meat. The supplements themselves are suspect and could easily be tainted or fake. I eat grass-fed meats, limit my intake of pork and chicken, eat salmon whenever I can, and only pop a few of Mark Sisson's Vital Omegas capsules if I'm feeling like I haven't had enough fat or had too much plant food that day.

I don't force myself to eat anything I don't like, no matter how 'healthy' it's supposed to be. I tried to get into offal, but I can't. Oh well. My body will let me know if I need more of something (like how moody I get if I don't consume enough fat). I am primal inasmuch as it makes me 'less unhealthy', but I'm not working hard to make myself 'healthier' than I naturally would be on a standard paleo diet. I'll leave that to the wheatgrass-guzzling vegans...

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:51 AM

Also also, most people's bodies do not universally let them know if they need more of something. Is my body telling me to get more managanese and magnesium? No, but I'm currently low in that. My body tells me about water and dehydration, maybe a couple other things, but that's about it.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 14, 2010
at 06:39 AM

Kamal, he gives away free Vital Omegas with every Damage Control Master Formula (multivitamin) autoshipment.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:49 AM

Also, god love Mark Sisson, but his fish oil pills are horrendously overpriced! They are more than twice as much as the other quality brands, that have been tested in that report from two years ago as being quite pure.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 15, 2010
at 01:43 AM

Ah, I see. Mark writes some of the most clear and succinct articles, but I'm quite wary of his supplement biz. But if it allows him to write full time, great!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:53 AM

That omega 3 supplementation consensus is not a consensus. I've created a spreadsheet of the most commonly eaten foods by modern paleo/primal folks. Typical diets I see on diet logs end up being unbalanced, around 5:1 up to 12:1 omega ratio, despite being 100% primal and grass-fed. Why? Many reasons. Chicken, olive oil, etc is enough omega 6 to overwhelm your ratio. Even just eating grassfed beef will not help your ratio much. Now adding in some offal or game meat, that could help!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:59 AM

For example, I went to your blog, pulled a random recipe (chunky chicken burgers, looks yummy) and calculated the omega ratio as 5:1. That is with pasture eggs and free-range chicken. 5:1 is quite higher than the 1:1 or 2:1 ratio humans evolved on.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 13, 2010
at 02:31 AM

I get Mark's omega capsules for free. I get cramps in my legs if I'm low on magnesium. You can learn to listen to your body. My moods are particularly swayed if I lack dietary fat, and I get fatigued without enough Vit D. Ratios - I said I limit my intake of chicken and pork. 5:1 is still a frakload better than the 20+:1 I used to eat. I eat lots of game. Plus, your 'stats' on pastured meats where you are may differ to Aussie figures. Every animal is different anyway. I try to eat fresh fish at least once a day, but it's hard in winter. Don't let the perfect ruin the good.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on September 13, 2010
at 07:09 PM

Ratio can be misleading, check walnuts. Spreadsheet upload ?

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 04:45 AM

I may try to listen to my body better, but I'm not sure if it would tell me stuff or I would tell it stuff. There's so many nutrients and lifestyle confounders, pinning a symptom on one specific one is tough. Plus, half lives differ wildly. For now, my body tells me when it needs water, calories, sleep, and play. I suspect it might tell me about electrolytes too, but I've been wrong before.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 12, 2010
at 09:45 AM

That omega 3 supplementation consensus is not a consensus. I've created a spreadsheet of the most commonly eaten foods by modern paleo/primal folks. Typical diets I see on diet logs end up being unbalanced, around 5:1 up to 12:1 omega ratio, despite being 100% primal and grass-fed. Why? Many reasons. Chicken, olive oil, and anything except for seafood, some grassfed beef/eggs/game meat has enough omega 6 to overwhelm your ratio.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 15, 2010
at 01:44 AM

Ikco, I don't know how to upload files, but may try to figure it out. The spreadsheet spits out two result numbers: ratio and omega 6 load. The ratio is just an easier to understand interpretation of pufa intake.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 04:23 AM

Chris Masterjohn and friends say to keep all PUFAs as low as possible, Ray Peat says there's no essential fats, different people say different things. If I ate paleo as my taste buds wanted, my ratio would be around 10:1, which is better than before, but not great. Thus, supplementation to the tune of 1 teaspoon of fish oil on most days. If I start eating fish sometimes, or some anchovies and stuff like Kurt Harris, that might change.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 13, 2010
at 04:20 AM

What does one have to do to get Mark's omega capsules for free? Hmmm, don't answer that :( If you eat fish once a day, the whole ratio thing is pretty moot. I'm coming from the perspective of eating fish almost never.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on September 15, 2010
at 08:26 AM

Mark was a supplement expert long before he 'invented' Primal. It's his understanding of nutrition that lead his to broadening his understanding from supplementation to wider lifestyle changes. Purchasing his multivitamins is my way of showing support of his on-going effort and journey.

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