7

votes

Canned Salmon: Are the Omega 3s Oxidized?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 22, 2012 at 1:30 PM

I have found other hacks on similar topics but haven't seen a definitive answer. Does the cooking during the canning process oxidize the PUFA and Omega 3 in salmon?

I have been devouring the 14oz Wild Pink Salmon Cans from Trader Joes. The fish is wild, has all bones and skin included AND Trader Joes has it in a BPA free can. I thought I had all my bases covered for a great source of protein and a convenient meal until some reading led me to question the PUFA oxidation.

On a related note, I am constantly seeing a post on the Panu blog referenced about this topic but the link is broken. Can anyone provide a correct link?

954dbd7efe0e7653e8efd377d7776d38

(457)

on June 08, 2012
at 11:48 PM

Haha, come on man!

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 08, 2012
at 08:21 PM

The fish is sealed in the can before the heating. So they are pressure cooked in the can with very little oxygen available.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on June 08, 2012
at 11:26 AM

I am assuming the above is a joke. Its a joke, right?

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 08, 2012
at 11:03 AM

Pressure cooking limits oxygen exposure, reducing oxidation when compared to open air methods (frying, oven, grill, etc...).

954dbd7efe0e7653e8efd377d7776d38

(457)

on June 08, 2012
at 10:29 AM

Haha Matt, if they invent a pill to get all my nutritional needs, I'd be the first to sign up. I generally don't stress over food, but if Cordain says canned fish is bad, I am screwed because he is always right.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on June 08, 2012
at 03:14 AM

If it's a great source of vitamins and minerals and omega 3s ............. eat it.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on June 08, 2012
at 03:12 AM

Why does pressure cooked = minimal oxidation?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:26 AM

You know, if you stop eating, you also stop ingesting toxins, ALEs, AGEs, oxidized fats, etc...

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on March 23, 2012
at 11:29 AM

It seems like some PUFA will be oxidized regardless. The question now is how much? Does anyone know how long and at what temperature canned food is cooked at?

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on March 22, 2012
at 11:58 PM

I have tried asking this question, but there is never a clear answer, I guess no one really knows.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on March 22, 2012
at 01:45 PM

From what I understand, the companies that make canned salmon have a two part cooking process. First they cook the fish beforehand then put it into the can, seal it, and cook it again to kill anything harmful. I am worried about the first part of the cooking process.

  • 7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

    asked by

    (788)
  • Views
    8.8K
  • Last Activity
    1283D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

7 Answers

5
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 08, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I submitted this exact question to Robb Wolf via the podcast, and he answered it!

You can check out the episode here. (My question is #5 if you scroll down.)

His answer was basically that with canned fish, the pros outweigh the cons. Some of the n-3 is probably lost, but overall, he considered the canning process a fairly gentle way of cooking fish. And my personal opinion is that the n-3 is a little more "protected" when cooking fish as a whole food (even canning), as opposed to heating something like isolated flax oil, walnut oil, and stuff like that, where it's no longer in its natural package. I recommend listening to his answer when you get a chance. Good stuff. You can fast forward to it if you want...around 23:58.)

I was a little concerned about the oxidized fat, myself, but canned fish (not just salmon, but sardines, mackerel, etc) is just too damn handy and cost effective a source of good protein for me to kick to the curb.

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 22, 2012
at 02:22 PM

Cooking is an oxidative process, so yes, some of the PUFAs are going to be oxidized. Is that avoidable? Not really, unless you eat sashimi exclusively (even then, a certain percentage of PUFAs are getting oxidized just by cutting the fish.)

2
44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on March 22, 2012
at 01:54 PM

I always thought they cooked canned salmon/tuna under pressure in a sealed vessel... kind of like pasteurization... I don't know this for a fact, however, so maybe someone else has first hand experience and can clarify this...

If the salmon is pressure cooked, there should be minimal oxidization and it shouldn't be a problem. I love canned salmon as well, so I hope this is the case!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on June 08, 2012
at 03:12 AM

Why does pressure cooked = minimal oxidation?

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 08, 2012
at 11:03 AM

Pressure cooking limits oxygen exposure, reducing oxidation when compared to open air methods (frying, oven, grill, etc...).

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 08, 2012
at 08:21 PM

The fish is sealed in the can before the heating. So they are pressure cooked in the can with very little oxygen available.

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 22, 2012
at 03:55 PM

When I can my own salmon, I pressure cook it. I asked my BF because he gets his fish industrially canned, but he doesn't know how they do it. I think anytime you cook fish or heat it up to a temp there is going to be some oxidation, but I wouldn't worry too much about it, unless you want to only eat raw fish (which is great, but not always convenient or available in the safe form).

0
954dbd7efe0e7653e8efd377d7776d38

(457)

on June 08, 2012
at 12:19 AM

This has my orthorexia in hyper drive. Does anyone know of any solid evidence showing canned fish (salmon in particular) has high amounts of oxidized omega 3 and cholesterol? I found some indirect information from Cordain talking about canned fish being no good. If this is true, it would be a huge hit to the gut, for me. Canned salmon is a great source of many vitamins and minerals along with omega 3s. Thanks

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:26 AM

You know, if you stop eating, you also stop ingesting toxins, ALEs, AGEs, oxidized fats, etc...

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on June 08, 2012
at 11:26 AM

I am assuming the above is a joke. Its a joke, right?

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on June 08, 2012
at 03:14 AM

If it's a great source of vitamins and minerals and omega 3s ............. eat it.

954dbd7efe0e7653e8efd377d7776d38

(457)

on June 08, 2012
at 10:29 AM

Haha Matt, if they invent a pill to get all my nutritional needs, I'd be the first to sign up. I generally don't stress over food, but if Cordain says canned fish is bad, I am screwed because he is always right.

954dbd7efe0e7653e8efd377d7776d38

(457)

on June 08, 2012
at 11:48 PM

Haha, come on man!

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on March 22, 2012
at 01:42 PM

I used to wonder the same thing, but there isn't any oxygen in the cans to react so I don't think it'd be much of a problem?

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on March 22, 2012
at 01:45 PM

From what I understand, the companies that make canned salmon have a two part cooking process. First they cook the fish beforehand then put it into the can, seal it, and cook it again to kill anything harmful. I am worried about the first part of the cooking process.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!