4

votes

Canned Fish vs. Cooked Fresh Fish

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 01, 2012 at 2:14 PM

The texture of the two are obviously different, down to the bone. Why is this?

And why do I find that canned fish is more appetizing than fresh? In my mind I know it shouldn't be so, but my tastebuds don't lie. Is the protein more easily digestible or something?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 18, 2013
at 12:14 PM

If you say so. IMO, fresh fish should NEVER be brined

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on June 18, 2013
at 01:02 AM

@ CD - fresh fish should only be brined briefly (under 20 mins for most fillets, a little longer for whole fish) so that it doesn't become mushy

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on June 17, 2013
at 10:25 PM

@Dan - do you ever get salmon skin salads at Japanese restaurants? One of my FAVORITE lunches when I'm out working (my job requires alot of driving around Los Angeles). LOVE crispy salmon skin! Your idea for salmon skin chips is GREAT!!!

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on June 17, 2013
at 10:19 PM

All fresh fish has worms. Cultures that eat raw fish usually have preparation methods to lessen the impact of the parasites on your system (acid on ceviche, wasabi with sushi). You can fairly easily spot the worms if you look at raw fish, and you can take them out of your fish with tweezers. I do this before I freeze my fish for raw eating later. And most home freezers DON'T freeze at low enough temps to kill parasites, but it's better than nothing!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:02 PM

the paleo elephant, upon closer examination, it looks like the freezing temperatures required to kill parasites are quite extreme. Do you know if commercial/retail freezers reach those temperatures? Can household freezers even reach those temperatures? Hm...

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 03, 2012
at 02:17 PM

I am released from my bondage from canned salmon! Raw salmon, here I come!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 03, 2012
at 02:09 PM

No, I like the taste of canned better than fresh cooked, it has nothing to do with convenience. Thanks anyway though. Seems like I found my answer- Neither! Raw Salmon FTW.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 03, 2012
at 02:07 PM

This is brilliant. Eating some raw (frozen, then thawed) salmon right now. This is changing my life. Question, though: Once it's thawed in the fridge, how long does it keep? What if it reaches room temperature? Then how long does it keep in the fridge? This is filling me up much better than canned salmon--an 8-dollar hunk of salmon could last me 4 small meals...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 02, 2012
at 01:15 PM

I had heard about the parasites in raw salmon, but have only seen them once. Here's some explanatory material. http://www.sushiencyclopedia.com/sushi_concerns/sushi_parasites.html Searing the skin and freezing seem to be the best treatments.

C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on November 02, 2012
at 09:44 AM

Maybe it's the convenience & not canned > fresh cooked for taste.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 01, 2012
at 10:04 PM

Never heard of parasites in salmon - not to say it doesn't happen.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 07:20 PM

My cooking is excellent, thank you very much. I'm consistently complimented by people on my cooking, including when it comes to Salmon.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 01, 2012
at 05:35 PM

I've found that pink salmon tastes best when it's made into a paste, e.g., tuna fish salad, or better yet, salmon mousse (not that hard).

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:59 PM

"Freezing and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -31°F (-35°C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 24 hours is sufficient to kill parasites. FDA's Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption." Awesome. Source: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/Seafood/FishandFisheriesProductsHazardsandControlsGuide/ucm091704.htm

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:47 PM

This makes sense. I wonder to what extent the cellular structure is broken down. Like, I wonder if the proteins get broken down more than with fresh cooked fish.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:39 PM

You did not pay attention when you read my post.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:38 PM

How long do you brine fresh fosh? I add sea salt, but never brine it.

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on November 01, 2012
at 04:35 PM

Raw salmon with real sea salt -- one of my favorite and easiest meals. Yum.

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on November 01, 2012
at 04:34 PM

I usually just thaw frozen fish and eat it raw. Freezing fish kills parasites.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:27 PM

After seeing a live worm in wild "fresh" salmon I steer clear of raw.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 03:50 PM

Same! Raw salmon trumps all. I seriously get high offa dat.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Off-topic: I've always thought "Salmon Skin Chips" would be the ultimate expensive healthy snack food.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 03:15 PM

It's just packed in salt water. Nothing different from how I would eat fresh salmon. I do love the skin though. It's still great in canned salmon, but you're right, it's better fresh.

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:52 PM

I read about it on MDA. I think the link to the original article broke. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/salmon-factory-farm-vs-wild/

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Also, where did you hear that farmed salmon doesn't hold up well to the canning process? I'm always suspicious that cheap canned salmon (bumblebee, for example) is lying and is actually farmed.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:32 PM

I'm comparing canned wildcaught salmon with fresh wildcaught salmon.

  • 194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

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10 Answers

best answer

1
32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on November 01, 2012
at 03:40 PM

For me, it's fresh raw wild-caught salmon > canned wild-caught salmon > cooked fresh wild-caught salmon. But maybe I just suck at cooking. :p

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:27 PM

After seeing a live worm in wild "fresh" salmon I steer clear of raw.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:59 PM

"Freezing and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -31°F (-35°C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 24 hours is sufficient to kill parasites. FDA's Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption." Awesome. Source: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/Seafood/FishandFisheriesProductsHazardsandControlsGuide/ucm091704.htm

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 03:50 PM

Same! Raw salmon trumps all. I seriously get high offa dat.

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on November 01, 2012
at 04:34 PM

I usually just thaw frozen fish and eat it raw. Freezing fish kills parasites.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 03, 2012
at 02:07 PM

This is brilliant. Eating some raw (frozen, then thawed) salmon right now. This is changing my life. Question, though: Once it's thawed in the fridge, how long does it keep? What if it reaches room temperature? Then how long does it keep in the fridge? This is filling me up much better than canned salmon--an 8-dollar hunk of salmon could last me 4 small meals...

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on November 01, 2012
at 04:35 PM

Raw salmon with real sea salt -- one of my favorite and easiest meals. Yum.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 01, 2012
at 10:04 PM

Never heard of parasites in salmon - not to say it doesn't happen.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 02, 2012
at 01:15 PM

I had heard about the parasites in raw salmon, but have only seen them once. Here's some explanatory material. http://www.sushiencyclopedia.com/sushi_concerns/sushi_parasites.html Searing the skin and freezing seem to be the best treatments.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:02 PM

the paleo elephant, upon closer examination, it looks like the freezing temperatures required to kill parasites are quite extreme. Do you know if commercial/retail freezers reach those temperatures? Can household freezers even reach those temperatures? Hm...

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on June 17, 2013
at 10:19 PM

All fresh fish has worms. Cultures that eat raw fish usually have preparation methods to lessen the impact of the parasites on your system (acid on ceviche, wasabi with sushi). You can fairly easily spot the worms if you look at raw fish, and you can take them out of your fish with tweezers. I do this before I freeze my fish for raw eating later. And most home freezers DON'T freeze at low enough temps to kill parasites, but it's better than nothing!

2
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:26 PM

I think the difference has to do with the canning because it is basically pressure-cooked. This breaks down the cellular structure of the meat and bone a little bit more. You can really see the difference if you try to dehydrate canned chicken vs. baked chicken. The dehydrated baked chicken doesn't rehydrate well and stays hard and rubbery. The canned or pressure-cooked chicken will rehydrate nicely and taste like meat again.

I like canned fish because I like to be able to eat the bones. But I think fresh is tastier for dinner. I dislike smoked canned fish.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:47 PM

This makes sense. I wonder to what extent the cellular structure is broken down. Like, I wonder if the proteins get broken down more than with fresh cooked fish.

1
F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:20 PM

What kind of fish is it? If it's salmon, then you might be eating fresh farmed salmon but canned wild salmon. I've heard that only wild-caught salmon can be canned, because the farmed stuff doesn't hold up well to the process. I prefer the taste and texture of wild-caught salmon (not to mention the better O3s and lower contamination), so that'd be my guess.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:32 PM

I'm comparing canned wildcaught salmon with fresh wildcaught salmon.

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:52 PM

I read about it on MDA. I think the link to the original article broke. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/salmon-factory-farm-vs-wild/

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Also, where did you hear that farmed salmon doesn't hold up well to the canning process? I'm always suspicious that cheap canned salmon (bumblebee, for example) is lying and is actually farmed.

0
B14a45cfdba5eff7747b1ec8a0a86377

on June 17, 2013
at 08:28 PM

spam spam spam, move along ...

(btw you just included this text in a "question" you started - what's the deal?)

0
C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on November 01, 2012
at 06:39 PM

Maybe your cooking sucks! or the fact that canned is salted & saturated in it's own juices is the reason you prefer it over fresh. ChowderHound posters usually rave about old canned sardines. In their opinion (like wine) it taste better when older.

C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on November 02, 2012
at 09:44 AM

Maybe it's the convenience & not canned > fresh cooked for taste.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 03, 2012
at 02:09 PM

No, I like the taste of canned better than fresh cooked, it has nothing to do with convenience. Thanks anyway though. Seems like I found my answer- Neither! Raw Salmon FTW.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 07:20 PM

My cooking is excellent, thank you very much. I'm consistently complimented by people on my cooking, including when it comes to Salmon.

0
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on November 01, 2012
at 05:49 PM

I love the taste of raw/fresh salmon and tuna. For a "cheat", I love sushi rolls with white rice. I don't really picture a caveman rolling up a sushi roll, but it is a rare (PWO) indulgence. I eat canned tuna and sardines, but I wouldn't say it's one of my favorite things for taste. I agree with other posters that I really enjoy salmon skin as well.

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:25 PM

With canned fish the bones usually cook with the meat which adds some calcium and a little flavor.

0
76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:02 PM

you might find canned fish more palatable if it is salty or smoked.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:39 PM

You did not pay attention when you read my post.

0
D7854f42e1c1d92f22b3903cd5d4a438

on November 01, 2012
at 03:28 PM

I've experimented with various canned and fresh salmon. The type of salmon matters in my opinion, not just whether it's wild caught.

I currently have canned sockeye salmon and fresh pink salmon. Both are wild caught. I enjoy the sockeye salmon more then the pink salmon. I've had fresh sockeye salmon as well and I like it just as much as the canned.

Also frying up fresh salmon skin till it's crisp like bacon is delicious, though it was a little weird for me at first.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 01, 2012
at 05:35 PM

I've found that pink salmon tastes best when it's made into a paste, e.g., tuna fish salad, or better yet, salmon mousse (not that hard).

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 01, 2012
at 02:54 PM

For me it is the opposite. But probably because I enjoy the skin of sockeye salmon so much, and you miss that in the canned version (if it has skin, it's usually pretty nasty). In fact, if I go with canned I typically looked for de-boned de-skinned salmon in salt water.

For you, I would assume that whatever it is packed in (either a brine or an oil) is infusing a flavor that better matches your pallet (usually more flavor. The bones and cartilage have had time to break down, allowing them to become edible. The vital choice brand that I usually buy uses high quality sea salt and is almost as expensive a fresh stuff!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Off-topic: I've always thought "Salmon Skin Chips" would be the ultimate expensive healthy snack food.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 01, 2012
at 04:38 PM

How long do you brine fresh fosh? I add sea salt, but never brine it.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on November 01, 2012
at 03:15 PM

It's just packed in salt water. Nothing different from how I would eat fresh salmon. I do love the skin though. It's still great in canned salmon, but you're right, it's better fresh.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on June 17, 2013
at 10:25 PM

@Dan - do you ever get salmon skin salads at Japanese restaurants? One of my FAVORITE lunches when I'm out working (my job requires alot of driving around Los Angeles). LOVE crispy salmon skin! Your idea for salmon skin chips is GREAT!!!

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 18, 2013
at 12:14 PM

If you say so. IMO, fresh fish should NEVER be brined

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on June 18, 2013
at 01:02 AM

@ CD - fresh fish should only be brined briefly (under 20 mins for most fillets, a little longer for whole fish) so that it doesn't become mushy

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