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Anecdotes regarding fish and mercury poisoning? Does anyone else feel mercury issue is overblown?

Commented on March 19, 2014
Created March 18, 2014 at 2:21 PM

Hey I'm looking for articles, studies, or more importantly anecdotes about the whole mercury poisoning issue from fish.

I had heard supposedly they found that even in the arctic regions where people are living off supposedly the worst of the worst mercury offenders that these peole are fine and healthy.

On the other end of the spectrum, I'm curious if anyone has stories or information about people who literally did end up consuming too much mercury from fish.

I have a feeling it's overblown and that the benefits of fish outweighs this potential threat.

Thank you for your thoughts!

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on March 19, 2014
at 10:09 PM

supplemental feed on pastured cows = salt lick.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 19, 2014
at 06:07 PM

Happy to be of assistance :)

Medium avatar

(0)

on March 19, 2014
at 05:24 PM

Great thanks for the inspiration! I am in the habit of purchasing smoked mackerel fillets with peppercorns, ultra convenient and well priced in every supermarket. But would love a fresh fish supper!

Medium avatar

(0)

on March 19, 2014
at 05:21 PM

Yes that is a very good point about fish choosing their own diet, without interference, that makes me even more pro-fish; thanks!

Medium avatar

(0)

on March 19, 2014
at 05:19 PM

I agree, prefer the smaller mackerel, either smoked with peppercorns. Or fresh, whole and dressed for the grill. Both great with salad. I take cod/haddock when on offer, and the smoked versions are great with eggs, but I have to be really in the mood for that much food. Great that you have an immediate benefit!

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 19, 2014
at 02:59 PM

What are you talking about? I never mentioned anything about salt here. Are you referring to the supplemental feed grass-fed cows get? Because that wasn't about salt in any way...during the winter (pastures are covered in snow) "grass-fed" cattle receive supplemental feed (often in the form of grain, such as corn) to make up for the lack of grass. Fish get no supplemental feed. And yes, salt is a perfectly natural nutrient.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on March 19, 2014
at 02:06 PM

what? in another thread you say that salt is a natural nutrient. Is it or is it not?

4bf47833e2e71bbbb6946dcec7dfd5da

on March 18, 2014
at 08:24 PM

wow thank you! will try those out!

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on March 18, 2014
at 05:55 PM

The smaller ones (at least the ones available in supermarkets) tend to be healthier I think, at least most of them are higher in omega 3's than the larger fish. When I eat cod, its nice, but its nothing compared to the rush of mental energy I get eating sardines or mackerel

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on March 18, 2014
at 05:40 PM

Sardines we open and bake in the oven, with some mediterranean spicing (garlic, parsley, olive oil, chili, lemon, in some combination). Herring, if really fresh, I still eat raw, otherwise same as sardines. not bought anchovies in a while. Mackerel opens up to a mackerel steak easily, with the spine and most bones easily removed. By far my favorite recipe is to cover the fleshy side with a paste made of bread crumbs (use gluten free or cornmeal if you can not take it), garlic, parsley, olive oil and salt. Bake for 40 minutes, skin side down. So tasty and so healthy.

4bf47833e2e71bbbb6946dcec7dfd5da

on March 18, 2014
at 04:38 PM

hey thanks. do you have any recipes and/or tips for preparing whole small fish like the ones you recommended, for example mackerel?

7acfcd88c36839f8e4075484c00de378

(0)

on March 18, 2014
at 03:46 PM

Hi Laura , I understand your concerns . One doctor in particular has reviewed studies at least on how it relates to pregnancy http://youtu.be/UD-2KiBRrck hope this helps!

4bf47833e2e71bbbb6946dcec7dfd5da

on March 18, 2014
at 02:37 PM

hey it's tough isn't it these days? i am grateful for what science has brought to us, but can you imagine being one of those people who started using margarine due to its supposed health properties only to discover later it completely annihilated your health?

it might be that the larger fish due in fact have more mercury, but that in the scheme of things these larger fish are even healthier than the smaller ones and the mercury isn't an issue.

let me know if you find anything else, thanks!

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4 Answers

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on March 18, 2014
at 04:26 PM

For us landlubbers, fish is some sort of integrator, iodine selenium and omega3. And those can be obtained with minimal mercury input if you stick to small fatty fish. On my own, I never buy anything other than sardines, anchovies, herring or mackerel. Fresh mackerel is my favorite, I used to eat it raw when living near the ocean.

4bf47833e2e71bbbb6946dcec7dfd5da

on March 18, 2014
at 04:38 PM

hey thanks. do you have any recipes and/or tips for preparing whole small fish like the ones you recommended, for example mackerel?

0
Medium avatar

on March 18, 2014
at 02:48 PM

Honestly I feel in this community that the mercury issue isn't talked about a enough and kind of swept under the rug. I think heavy metal toxicity is a real problem that contributes heavily auto-immune diseases, and If I'm wrong, please tell me! I'd love to be wrong so I can stop obsessing over my mercury amalgam fillings.

7acfcd88c36839f8e4075484c00de378

(0)

on March 18, 2014
at 03:46 PM

Hi Laura , I understand your concerns . One doctor in particular has reviewed studies at least on how it relates to pregnancy http://youtu.be/UD-2KiBRrck hope this helps!

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 18, 2014
at 02:38 PM

The mercury issue is fear-mongering sensationalism at its finest. Mercury poisoning from fish consumption is extremely rare, even in people who consume large amounts of fish. As long as you're not planning on eating swordfish, shark and bluefin tuna steaks and nothing else every single day for the next 6 months, I wouldn't worry about it. Eat your fish, wild caught fish is essentially the most truly "organic, free-range" thing you're ever going to consume in your lifetime. Even grass-fed cows get supplemental feed. Wild caught-fish are the real deal.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on March 19, 2014
at 02:06 PM

what? in another thread you say that salt is a natural nutrient. Is it or is it not?

Medium avatar

(0)

on March 19, 2014
at 05:21 PM

Yes that is a very good point about fish choosing their own diet, without interference, that makes me even more pro-fish; thanks!

0
Medium avatar

on March 18, 2014
at 02:33 PM

I'm a fish-lover too and share your desire for clarity. I prefer to eat wild ocean fish because they will have experienced natural lifestyle and the idea of toxicity is definitely 'offputting'. I havent looked for it, but I did recently find at least one discussion of research that showed a) varying amounts of toxicity, greater in larger fish and lesser in smaller b) that selenium also present in fish may 'offset' or counter-balance toxicity. I am not science-minded but that is the gist of it.

4bf47833e2e71bbbb6946dcec7dfd5da

on March 18, 2014
at 02:37 PM

hey it's tough isn't it these days? i am grateful for what science has brought to us, but can you imagine being one of those people who started using margarine due to its supposed health properties only to discover later it completely annihilated your health?

it might be that the larger fish due in fact have more mercury, but that in the scheme of things these larger fish are even healthier than the smaller ones and the mercury isn't an issue.

let me know if you find anything else, thanks!

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