3

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What do you think of this study on oxidized fish oil consumption?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 19, 2012 at 2:33 AM

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8640340

Abstract only, unfortunately. Still, very interesting- apparently we don't have to worry about oxidized fish oil (in the short term, at least). Also, is this a mark against the n6/oxidative stress theory?

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 19, 2012
at 04:51 AM

@chinaeskimo....good point. Most studies show them effective in a lot of different health improvements, some show them ineffective. Making one change will not correct many negatives, but they can be a positive addition to a good diet and lifestyle. Its good to know they are not harmful.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 04:12 AM

@Nasty Brutish and Short: Harmful and ineffective are two totally different things.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on July 19, 2012
at 04:05 AM

If there's nothing harmful about fish oil supplements then why have several studies found taking them to be ineffective?

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 03:55 AM

@RaiseFitness: I am glad you read and interpreted, 'cause I was too tired to +1

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 19, 2012
at 03:42 AM

Thanks. From reading the entire study, my take is that there isn't much negative that can come from taking fish oil supplements, because even if they oxidize a little in storage, they still increased serum levels of EPA and DHA without increasing CRP or other oxidative signs.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 03:16 AM

Here you go: The whole study https://oda.hio.no/jspui/bitstream/10642/1011/2/ulven_bjnutr-2011.pdf

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Yeah, but rancid fish oil (even the idea of rancid fish oil) makes me puke!

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3 Answers

2
B4a2c2c619b1a5488b7196586a815354

on July 19, 2012
at 05:35 AM

Better off consuming Krill Oil which is less prone to oxidation and is also better absorbed/utilized by the body: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/inflammation/why-krill-oil/

0
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 19, 2012
at 03:12 AM

Curious, but it seems if they measured EPA and DHA in both fish oil groups, then the oxidized oil was not those, but other oils in the supplements. That is an interesting study, since paleo supplementation of fish oil is to increase our EPA and DHA consumption. If those were oxidized, they would not have been the same chemicals EPA and DHA. Wish I had access to the complete study rather than just the abstract.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 19, 2012
at 04:51 AM

@chinaeskimo....good point. Most studies show them effective in a lot of different health improvements, some show them ineffective. Making one change will not correct many negatives, but they can be a positive addition to a good diet and lifestyle. Its good to know they are not harmful.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on July 19, 2012
at 04:05 AM

If there's nothing harmful about fish oil supplements then why have several studies found taking them to be ineffective?

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 04:12 AM

@Nasty Brutish and Short: Harmful and ineffective are two totally different things.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 03:16 AM

Here you go: The whole study https://oda.hio.no/jspui/bitstream/10642/1011/2/ulven_bjnutr-2011.pdf

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 19, 2012
at 03:55 AM

@RaiseFitness: I am glad you read and interpreted, 'cause I was too tired to +1

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 19, 2012
at 03:42 AM

Thanks. From reading the entire study, my take is that there isn't much negative that can come from taking fish oil supplements, because even if they oxidize a little in storage, they still increased serum levels of EPA and DHA without increasing CRP or other oxidative signs.

0
03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

on July 19, 2012
at 02:48 AM

EDITED: Here is the entire study link text

I may have missed it in the abstract, but I didn't see the researcher mention just how oxidized the fish oil was. A little bit? A lot? I would think that would make a difference.

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