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Does dried coconut inhibit nutrient absorption?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 30, 2011 at 7:22 AM

Dried coconut has so much fibre, does this bind to and stop absorption of certain minerals?

I think the fibre is mainly soluble so shoudnt be affected by this problem, such as with in-soluble fibres and phytates.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 30, 2011
at 02:10 PM

fiber shortens food transit time in the digestive tract

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 30, 2011
at 10:58 AM

Coconut fiber is 93% insoluble fiber and only 7% soluble fiber. I don't know about binding though.

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4 Answers

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on September 10, 2011
at 06:34 PM

What's important isn't whether it has phytate, it's whether the phytate:mineral molar ratio is high during digestion of mineral-rich foods. You could stop eating it, but it'd be just as effective to segregate it from foods like meat, organs, etc. so that the minerals and phytate aren't in your small intestine at the same time.

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 10, 2011
at 03:25 PM

It has a considerable amount of phytate too, as you can see on my post. I still eat it, but I gave it a rest with the "bread everything in coconut!!!" trend.

0
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 30, 2011
at 02:13 PM

its rich in insoluble fiber which shortens digestive transit, this decreases nutrient absorption. the fiber can bind nutrients afaik. it also contains some phytic acid.

0
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on July 30, 2011
at 01:56 PM

I don't believe fiber is what inhibits nutrient absorption (in fact I think it helps, as it slows the digestion of food, thus enabling the gut to work its magic and let the enzymes break it down instead of passing through in a hurry), it's the levels of oxalates in grains and legumes & certain leafy plants that do that. Oxalate, present in many plant foods (especially high in beans, spinach & beets) binds to calcium in the gut and prevents absorption. As far as I'm aware of, nuts & seeds (and coconut is a nut, lol) aside from almonds are low to moderate in oxalates and are perfectly fine to consume in normal amounts (ie, handfuls).

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 30, 2011
at 02:10 PM

fiber shortens food transit time in the digestive tract

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