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Fever therapy?

Commented on March 27, 2014
Created March 26, 2014 at 1:16 PM

Has anyone here ever heard of or have any thoughts on Fever Therapy?

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 27, 2014
at 07:15 PM

I said not optimal. "Not dangerous" and "optimal" are two different things. 99.x degrees probably won't kill you or do any damage, and I never said it absolutely would. All I said was that generally it's best not to try to to elevate one's temperature on purpose without proper medical supervision and equipment. This isn't a computer you can overclock and just buy a new CPU if the old one burns from overheating, this is your health. I wouldn't tweak something that isn't broken, especially over perceived benefits some pseudo-scientific therapy, which has not been proven effective. Regards.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 27, 2014
at 06:58 PM

-_-, you're sources conflict, and a temperature of 99.x is not dangerous in normal healthy populations....

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 27, 2014
at 01:51 PM

Definition

Hyperthermia (/hīpərˈTHərmēə/): the condition of having a body temperature greatly above normal.

There is a reason for tight regulation of body temperature control; it is because our bodies function optimally at 98.6 (not above or below). If you choose to tamper with this, do so at your own risk.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 10:36 PM

The source you provided says that organ failure/death would be a result of Hyperpyrexia which is a temperature above 104 degrees Fahrenheit according to your source. It specifically defines hyperthermia as 99.5-100.9 in the sidebar . It also says that peoples' temperatures can naturally fluctuate up to 99.9 in healthy populations. Hopefully nobody walks away from this thread trying to get their temperature much above 100 degrees unsupervised for an extended period of time. But your source does not show toxicity below 104 degrees just to be clear.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 26, 2014
at 10:01 PM

The body does a very good job of maintaining a steady body temperature 98.6 F (or 37 C) and changes in this temperature are usually pathological. You could certainly raise your body temperature by wrapping yourself around something hot, however, your body will do its very best to cool itself down, and if it is unable to, you will experience hyperthermia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthermia#Signs_and_symptoms) which could lead to unconsciousness, organ failure and death. My advice is don't do it, you could cause some serious damage.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 09:41 PM

Interestingly, are you aware of any effect of core body temperature on having a healthy immune system. I'd be curious to know if people who consistently have a low body temperature also have compromised immune function (this is just a thought though, I have no evidence on this one way or another).

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 09:40 PM

There are multiple means to induce fever, some people go to such extremes as injecting dead bacteria/ previously existing viruses into patients (which you touched on and I agree is most likely a bad idea in most cases). However, in the winter I like to be nice and toasty under an electric blanket, sometimes I might sweat a little on my body but my face is cool. Is this creating core temperatures above 100 degrees? I don't know I haven't tried that along with a rectal thermometer (lol). If it does thought that would be a prolonged fever at 8 hours and this would be practical.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 26, 2014
at 09:25 PM

I see what you mean about replication/destruction. However, a prolonged fever cannot be sustained long term, it's just not practical. A short-term fever can be induced, either by introduction of another virus which causes a fever in order to affect any previously existing viruses (for example malariotherapy, which is not a good idea by the way) or artificially through immersion in hot water, saunas, heating blankets and such. I guess it ultimately depends on what your objectives are. But if you want to keep viruses away, your best bet is a strong and healthy immune system.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 09:09 PM

Well you bring up a good point about high temperatures not killing viruses, however, my comment was specifically in regards to inhibiting replication which, is definitely different than destruction which is probably where the confusion is arising from. It seems that high temperatures do inhibit herpes and possibly other chronic viral infections (sources if requested). Whether fevers enhance the immune system (il1,il2) is outside the scope of this comment chain, but I'd be happy to discuss if you answer this question separately.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 26, 2014
at 09:00 PM

Well, it depends. Viral replication is not always inhibited. Many viruses are perfectly capable of withstanding high body temperatures with ease. If high temperatures killed off viruses then we would have cured Hepatitis, HIV, Herpes, Epstein-Barr virus, and all the other chronic viral infections by now. Unfortunately, that is not the case. What ultimately kills viruses is the immune system. The immune system is activated by interleukins (like IL-1, IL-2, etc.) which signal that a pathogen is present and must be targeted. Interleukins that activate the immune system are pro-inflammatory.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 08:44 PM

to cause protein destruction because replication should be inhibited before transcription..

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 08:43 PM

Okay, I think you're misinterpreting what I'm saying because of failure of communication on my part. I'm trying to ask in my comment why and at what point might high temperatures favor (normal healthy cell division) transcription over (viral) replication. Are you saying that viral replication is not inhibited during a fever? Because it sounds like you're saying that immune system cell (transcription) division increases and that viral replication would do the same at high temperatures. Fever therapy would theoretically have therapeutic effects at temperatures lower than the temperature

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 26, 2014
at 08:21 PM

Well, fevers are helpful because they seem to make immune system cells (leukocytes) more efficient at destroying pathogens. Certain viruses also have strict temperature ranges (they are composed of proteins after all) and beyond their range, damage to their protein structure could destroy them. Cell division does not stop during a fever, as a matter of fact, immune system cell division likely increases to meet the immune system's demand.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 08:01 PM

So is there a disparity between the temperature at which viral replication would be inhibited and at which normal cell division would be inhibited? Like are they both inhibited at 103 or is one inhibited more than the other at that temperature.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 26, 2014
at 03:53 PM

Yeah you're right, high temperatures can cause brain damage so it's probably best to avoid overdoing the whole fever therapy thing.

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96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on March 26, 2014
at 03:26 PM

I guess the idea is to raise the temperature above what an invading virus/bacteria can handle, the same as what a fever would do as a part of the immune system.

Of course, if we stay too hot for too long, there's damage done. We do have built in cooling systems that would fight an external attempt to heat up... breath, sweating for example.

So if anything, this questions the idea that we should take drugs to address fevers (unless the temperature goes high above 103F (39.4 C).

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 26, 2014
at 08:01 PM

So is there a disparity between the temperature at which viral replication would be inhibited and at which normal cell division would be inhibited? Like are they both inhibited at 103 or is one inhibited more than the other at that temperature.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on March 26, 2014
at 03:53 PM

Yeah you're right, high temperatures can cause brain damage so it's probably best to avoid overdoing the whole fever therapy thing.

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