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Can I ferment juice with probiotic pills?

Answered on January 04, 2014
Created January 02, 2014 at 5:47 PM

I can't seem to find. Anything on google about this, only about water kefir and I dunno why?

I'm trying to figure out how to get vitamin k2 without eating natto or supplements

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on January 04, 2014
at 12:06 PM

The sense of the words indicate without supplementing actual K2. Probiotics are bacteria, using them to ferment other substrates (foods, fruits, veggies), then use their products is not using them as supplements, rather it's using their end products as a food.

Medium avatar

(238)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:40 PM

something to do with the fermentation of the meats to create salami. I assume other sausages that undergo similar ferments would also be rich in K2.

Medium avatar

(78)

on January 02, 2014
at 10:51 PM

I'll deffo pick up some salami at whole foods! Thanks! Why does salami have k2 compared to other cuts? I don't do dairy at all!

Medium avatar

(78)

on January 02, 2014
at 10:50 PM

You're lovely! I really just want to ferment fruit juice in college! I think sugar is evil and just want to be healthy and survive I college on a budget!

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7 Answers

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 04, 2014
at 12:55 PM

Fermented fruit juice? They have a four letter word for that: "wine"

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on January 04, 2014
at 12:06 PM

You're better off getting your hands on some Natto, then soaking lentils for a very long time, and cooking them for a very long time, and using the Natto on the lentils. I know you said juice, but it's possible that the bacillus subtilis natto will thrive, or not, in juice. Lentils do have some anti-nutrients, but if you were to use any legume, they'd be the least offensive of the bunch.

This bacteria has several end products, only one of which is K2, and it seems to work well with soy beans, and other legumes for producing K2. Feeding it juice, may or may not work, you won't have any way to know if it produces K2 in that substrate instead of one of the other products.

You'll need some way to test that the fermentation happened - you can do this with sugar levels, or see if there's offgassing, and that the right bacteria fermented it, and that it produced K2. Tasting the juice for sugar levels is one way to tell that fermentation happened, but a very poor one.

It's possible that the bacillus subtilis natto did not thrive in the juice, and the juice got contaminated with gram negative bacteria, or yeasts from the air, or other sources, and the end products may well be toxic, or you may ingest unwanted gut flora.

Unless you have your own lab capable of testing K2 levels, it's not a great idea.

Feeding this bacteria the substrate to which it's adapted is going to be a lot safer.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on January 03, 2014
at 10:21 PM

Fermented veggies have higher K2 levels as well--try sauerkraut. Cabbage is available all year round, it's easy to do at home with just a jar for equipment.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on January 03, 2014
at 09:23 PM

Excuse my ignorance..... How is a probiotic not a supplement?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on January 04, 2014
at 12:06 PM

The sense of the words indicate without supplementing actual K2. Probiotics are bacteria, using them to ferment other substrates (foods, fruits, veggies), then use their products is not using them as supplements, rather it's using their end products as a food.

0
Medium avatar

on January 02, 2014
at 10:49 PM

I just wanted to ferment fruit juice at college :)

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on January 02, 2014
at 10:47 PM

from chris kresser website:

Foods high in vitamin K2

  • Natto
  • Hard cheese
  • Soft cheese
  • Egg yolk
  • Butter
  • Chicken liver
  • Salami
  • Chicken breast
  • Ground beef

some probiotics will ferment in milk, some wont. same probably goes for juices. only way to know is try it.

Medium avatar

(78)

on January 02, 2014
at 10:51 PM

I'll deffo pick up some salami at whole foods! Thanks! Why does salami have k2 compared to other cuts? I don't do dairy at all!

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on January 02, 2014
at 10:27 PM

I have read somewhere that you can "jumpstart" a ferment with the contents of a probiotic capsule. But it's really not necessary because most real organic foods come with their own ready supply of good (AND BAD) bacteria. If you induce the right conditions, you can favor the good bacteria to crowd out the bad, and end up with a nice probiotic drink.

It does take TIME and some basic knowledge of what you are doing. And you do have to have at least a basic understanding of what you are doing because there are dangers involved. At the least you may produce unintended alcohol, and at the most you could favor the bad bacteria and or mold to cause you harm.

So that's the first question: What do you want to ferment? Knowing that will help us offer some guidance about the best way to go about it, so you have a safe and delicious drink. Just dumping a probiotic capsule in some juice and waiting a few days is not a good idea.

Fermentation is not difficult at all. It's kind of fun, and interesting. Just geeky enough to make me excited every day to see how my ferments are doing and think up new combinations to play with.

Medium avatar

(78)

on January 02, 2014
at 10:50 PM

You're lovely! I really just want to ferment fruit juice in college! I think sugar is evil and just want to be healthy and survive I college on a budget!

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