2

votes

keep veges warm for faster fermentation (yoghurt maker?)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 20, 2012 at 2:12 AM

Did anyone used yoghurt maker to speed up fermentation? I don't have much space to keep fermenting veges for long periods of time.

Yoghurt maker basically keeps 36C temperature for many hours. I just started using it myself, wonder if somebody has useful advice.

Please go ahead if you have other ideas on how to keep stuff warm for extended periods of time (crazy contraptions are welcome!)

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:58 AM

Kefir is much easier to deal with than yogurt, and much cheaper, and much healthier.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 24, 2012
at 03:20 AM

"...shake some on after I chop up each cabbage. I use more salt in summer, less in winter." Katz, Sandor Ellix; Sally Fallon (2011-08-10). Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture FoodsReclaiming Domesticity from a Consumer Culture (p. 41). Chelsea Green Publishing. Kindle Edition. I just got it from that. Hey stuff definitely can and will go wrong with wild ferments. Try a couple batches at once so that you at least get one good one (or many).

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:32 AM

The lacto-bacteria produce lactic acid as a byproduct. They don't need acidity to start out with. Commercial vinegars are a fermented product, but then they are pasteurized, killing all the probiotics that were produced when they were fermented and so will not give your ferment a boost. Vinegar can make tasty refrigerator pickles and can give a more consistent result, and that is why grocery store pickles are made with it instead of fermentation. If probiotics are what you are after, then fermentation is what you want, not just the sour taste provided by vinegar.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I heard that vinegar helps to create acidic environment that lactobacteria likes. Besides vinegar is fermented product, this might help also. It's not extremely cold, but seems to be a couple degrees less than preferred by useful bacteria.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 24, 2012
at 12:59 AM

I thought salt speeds up fermentation as it helps to break down cell membranes. Heard that it's iodised salt is bad. Anyway, I don't mind longer fermentation times, the problem was mold and strange smell.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 23, 2012
at 12:10 AM

Thanks Ryan, how long did you keep yoghurt in an oven? Do you know what temperature oven with light on produces? Did you try it to ferment vegetables?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 20, 2012
at 06:22 PM

Well "room temperature varies" is part of the fun of working with living food :). You need to use more salt in the summer and less in the winter by my understandings. Good luck though!

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:37 AM

I would nix the vinegar, were I were you. It is not going to speed fermentation. You can add whey (many people do) and that will speed it up, but a lot of people find that the result has a slimier texture. They also have vegetable starter cultures, which will also speed it up, but I don't have any experience with them myself. If your "room temp" is extremely cold, I would also recommend the oven with light on.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:13 AM

I usually do this, also adding a bit of vinegar

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Bacteria dies when it's higher than 40C, trying to not overheat it.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:10 AM

thanks for reply, but "room temperature" varies. Now it is winter in Sydney, so it takes too long for veges to ferment. They just got moldy last time.

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4 Answers

2
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 20, 2012
at 03:30 AM

This isn't necessarily about using heat to speed up fermentation, but another way you can speed it up is to use a few spoonfuls of brine from your last ferment to add to your current ferment.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:13 AM

I usually do this, also adding a bit of vinegar

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:37 AM

I would nix the vinegar, were I were you. It is not going to speed fermentation. You can add whey (many people do) and that will speed it up, but a lot of people find that the result has a slimier texture. They also have vegetable starter cultures, which will also speed it up, but I don't have any experience with them myself. If your "room temp" is extremely cold, I would also recommend the oven with light on.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I heard that vinegar helps to create acidic environment that lactobacteria likes. Besides vinegar is fermented product, this might help also. It's not extremely cold, but seems to be a couple degrees less than preferred by useful bacteria.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:32 AM

The lacto-bacteria produce lactic acid as a byproduct. They don't need acidity to start out with. Commercial vinegars are a fermented product, but then they are pasteurized, killing all the probiotics that were produced when they were fermented and so will not give your ferment a boost. Vinegar can make tasty refrigerator pickles and can give a more consistent result, and that is why grocery store pickles are made with it instead of fermentation. If probiotics are what you are after, then fermentation is what you want, not just the sour taste provided by vinegar.

2
27bac964edd249667d0fb749daeeb090

(263)

on July 20, 2012
at 02:45 AM

inside the oven with just the light turned on does the trick for me for yogurt.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 23, 2012
at 12:10 AM

Thanks Ryan, how long did you keep yoghurt in an oven? Do you know what temperature oven with light on produces? Did you try it to ferment vegetables?

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:58 AM

Kefir is much easier to deal with than yogurt, and much cheaper, and much healthier.

1
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 20, 2012
at 02:21 AM

My first choice is just to let the ferment take as long as it needs to at room temp, BUT since you really wanna speed it up:

If you make bone broth you in a crock pot....you could set it in a corner by that to get the radiant heat.

I use a some heat packs, a towel, and a cooler to make my 24hr yogurt so you could do that with the ferments I suppose. Just reheat the hot packs every once in a while.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:10 AM

thanks for reply, but "room temperature" varies. Now it is winter in Sydney, so it takes too long for veges to ferment. They just got moldy last time.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 20, 2012
at 06:22 PM

Well "room temperature varies" is part of the fun of working with living food :). You need to use more salt in the summer and less in the winter by my understandings. Good luck though!

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 24, 2012
at 03:20 AM

"...shake some on after I chop up each cabbage. I use more salt in summer, less in winter." Katz, Sandor Ellix; Sally Fallon (2011-08-10). Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture FoodsReclaiming Domesticity from a Consumer Culture (p. 41). Chelsea Green Publishing. Kindle Edition. I just got it from that. Hey stuff definitely can and will go wrong with wild ferments. Try a couple batches at once so that you at least get one good one (or many).

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 24, 2012
at 12:59 AM

I thought salt speeds up fermentation as it helps to break down cell membranes. Heard that it's iodised salt is bad. Anyway, I don't mind longer fermentation times, the problem was mold and strange smell.

0
1133603ea602c6824da56e8b596c9754

on July 20, 2012
at 02:59 AM

I'm not sure it's beneficial to speed things up. You can end up killing the good bacteria. Veggie bacteria likes lower temps, I believe.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 20, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Bacteria dies when it's higher than 40C, trying to not overheat it.

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