3

votes

Fermentation paleo or not

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 16, 2011 at 5:27 PM

Do any of you paleo hacks ferment foods? It is a big part of WAPF and is one of the 4 pillars of Deep Nutrition, but it seems to not be part of paleo discussions. Am I missing out on nutritional benefits and a boost to the immune system? What if you heat sauerkraut...does that destroy the benefit of fermentation?

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on June 20, 2011
at 07:37 AM

Yes, I've heard that. The only things I ferment right now are the kombucha (which you only cover with fabric) and lacto-fermented veggies (which you ferment tightly covered with a lid), so I'm not terribly worried about it. When I was doing raw yogurt and kefir, I kept them away from my kombucha. What do you like to ferment?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 19, 2011
at 03:18 AM

just as I was writing the part about the fermented animal guts, I glanced up and read your post-lol. I just read somewhere to be careful to keep your different ferments away from each other to avoid cross fermenting. Have you heard of this?

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 08:27 PM

Caverat, LOVE IT! Great idea.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 17, 2011
at 06:52 PM

Yes - it's a concentrated way to get some of the bacteria now, that probably were ubiquitous in the food and soil 'back then'. Cabbage, for example, has the bacteria needed for sauerkraut *already on the leaves* and it's probably been there symbiotically since Brassicas first arrived on the scene. So not only are we getting 'some' bacteria with sauerkraut, we're getting the SAME bacteria our ancestors (who ate Brassicas) consumed.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 17, 2011
at 05:13 PM

I can one-up you guys on the fermentation crock: I use a cylindrical flower vase :-) It holds only about 2.5 lbs cabbage max which is perfect since my wife doesn't touch the stuff (she thinks it will kill her). And it's clear and I use red cabbage, so it's pretty. Here's a picture: http://caverat.posterous.com/pages/sauerkraut-in-a-flower-vase . I may graduate to a 'grown-up' crock on day, especially if I can find more people to eat it!

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 17, 2011
at 04:50 PM

ooh I'm so glad someone else feels the same way! It's like keeping Gerbils or having a garden or something. You open the jar, see how along it is, give it food as needed, clean out the jar. And then you eat them!

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on June 17, 2011
at 02:42 PM

Its not paleo in the sense of historical reenactment, but it's paleo as far as the modern diet is concerned.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 01:21 PM

Nancy you can be very successful with just regular old jars so it's well worth trying it out without the pickl-it. I do like the pickl-it and after reading many great reviews decided to try it instead of buying a $100 fermenting crock (pottery) which is beautiful but seemed a lot of money to spend on a hobby I wasn't sure I would keep up with over time. Now that I'm pretty hooked on this the crock is on my Christmas list.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Sorry. I spelled it incorrectly. Here's the site. http://www.pickl-it.com/

D5096ff5baffc0ba5d20b21346414a7a

(1112)

on June 17, 2011
at 10:40 AM

Shari, thanks, but I what is a pickle-it? When I search I just find pickled snack products or books to buy.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 01:45 AM

Nancy I am not a fan of pickles but have grown to love kraut. I do other veggies too but always combine with either a bit of cabbage or cucumber since those two have the kind of bacteria you want. I tried without and it did not work. I also bought a pickle-it and every batch turns out really well although you certainly don't need one. I do all kinds of combinations most of which I stole from a local kraut maker. I add leeks and horseradish or beets and carrots usually. Definitely some trial and error involved but that makes it interesting. Some good videos on how to on youtube.

D5096ff5baffc0ba5d20b21346414a7a

(1112)

on June 16, 2011
at 09:27 PM

I like yogurt and have made my own. But I just have never developed a taste for sour foods.not even pickles. What would you suggest for starters...a gateway fermented food?

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 16, 2011
at 07:53 PM

It is fun isn't it? I feel like I got a few new pets with these cultures I now have to tend to and take care of. Who knew, right?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 16, 2011
at 07:28 PM

excellent answer. I love fermented foods. Daily staple. However, i would posit that they would NOT be part of a paleolithic era person's diet. So i suppose they're not part of that framework. The bacteria, though, that would prolly be more present.

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6 Answers

best answer

8
1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on June 16, 2011
at 06:23 PM

While not paleo per se, one could argue that we evolved under conditions where we ate significantly more beneficial bacteria with our food and that this is a good substitute for our modern, hygenic world.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 16, 2011
at 07:28 PM

excellent answer. I love fermented foods. Daily staple. However, i would posit that they would NOT be part of a paleolithic era person's diet. So i suppose they're not part of that framework. The bacteria, though, that would prolly be more present.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 17, 2011
at 06:52 PM

Yes - it's a concentrated way to get some of the bacteria now, that probably were ubiquitous in the food and soil 'back then'. Cabbage, for example, has the bacteria needed for sauerkraut *already on the leaves* and it's probably been there symbiotically since Brassicas first arrived on the scene. So not only are we getting 'some' bacteria with sauerkraut, we're getting the SAME bacteria our ancestors (who ate Brassicas) consumed.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on June 17, 2011
at 02:42 PM

Its not paleo in the sense of historical reenactment, but it's paleo as far as the modern diet is concerned.

4
Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 16, 2011
at 07:35 PM

I make kefir daily (from the 'grains' - the living culture kept over from a previous batch, not powder) and also fermented sauerkraut. I really like both but eat the sauerkraut less regularly because of the goitergenic issue.

Homemade kefir, btw, is vastly superior to both powdered and store-bought, in the quantity, variety and 'aliveness' of the bacteria, and it has less lactose. It's amazing stuff!

Also, home fermentation is fun! I feel like of sort a farmer in my own kitchen, daily straining out the grains and/or chopping the cabbage and feeding the 'animals' (bacteria), and making sure that 'everybody' is 'happy' :-)

Edited to Add: I don't heat it, because it kills the bacteria. That said, heat minimizes the goitergenic problem...

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 16, 2011
at 07:53 PM

It is fun isn't it? I feel like I got a few new pets with these cultures I now have to tend to and take care of. Who knew, right?

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 17, 2011
at 04:50 PM

ooh I'm so glad someone else feels the same way! It's like keeping Gerbils or having a garden or something. You open the jar, see how along it is, give it food as needed, clean out the jar. And then you eat them!

3
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on June 16, 2011
at 07:19 PM

I definitely think a case can be made for fermentation being paleo. It's a natural process as Sara noted. I also think that when you look at the focus on gut health that is a cornerstone of the paleo philosophy eating fermented foods makes complete sense. Even if you don't happen to see it as paleo per se it's hard to argue that it isn't at least a strong compliment to a paleo diet.

Never in my life did I think I would say "I ferment" yet that is what this lifestyle has done to me. My name is Shari and I am a fermenter. I have to say I do feel better since adding fermented foods into the diet. Plus they are kind of tasty.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 01:45 AM

Nancy I am not a fan of pickles but have grown to love kraut. I do other veggies too but always combine with either a bit of cabbage or cucumber since those two have the kind of bacteria you want. I tried without and it did not work. I also bought a pickle-it and every batch turns out really well although you certainly don't need one. I do all kinds of combinations most of which I stole from a local kraut maker. I add leeks and horseradish or beets and carrots usually. Definitely some trial and error involved but that makes it interesting. Some good videos on how to on youtube.

D5096ff5baffc0ba5d20b21346414a7a

(1112)

on June 16, 2011
at 09:27 PM

I like yogurt and have made my own. But I just have never developed a taste for sour foods.not even pickles. What would you suggest for starters...a gateway fermented food?

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 17, 2011
at 05:13 PM

I can one-up you guys on the fermentation crock: I use a cylindrical flower vase :-) It holds only about 2.5 lbs cabbage max which is perfect since my wife doesn't touch the stuff (she thinks it will kill her). And it's clear and I use red cabbage, so it's pretty. Here's a picture: http://caverat.posterous.com/pages/sauerkraut-in-a-flower-vase . I may graduate to a 'grown-up' crock on day, especially if I can find more people to eat it!

D5096ff5baffc0ba5d20b21346414a7a

(1112)

on June 17, 2011
at 10:40 AM

Shari, thanks, but I what is a pickle-it? When I search I just find pickled snack products or books to buy.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Sorry. I spelled it incorrectly. Here's the site. http://www.pickl-it.com/

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 08:27 PM

Caverat, LOVE IT! Great idea.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 17, 2011
at 01:21 PM

Nancy you can be very successful with just regular old jars so it's well worth trying it out without the pickl-it. I do like the pickl-it and after reading many great reviews decided to try it instead of buying a $100 fermenting crock (pottery) which is beautiful but seemed a lot of money to spend on a hobby I wasn't sure I would keep up with over time. Now that I'm pretty hooked on this the crock is on my Christmas list.

3
6337347af520cecb574497af83ce9e78

on June 16, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Fermentation was discovered because it happens. I suspect it's especially beneficial for people who don't eat much raw food and miss out on the beneficial bacteria and enzymes. And, yes, heating the saurkraut kills the beneficial bacteria. I make pickles, kim chi, beets, and sometimes coconut yogurt.

1
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 16, 2011
at 08:00 PM

Kombuncha is my fermented beverage of choice. I find that if I get some fermented foods my allergies improve.

0
2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on June 17, 2011
at 12:29 AM

I ferment and I love it! Have two big gallon jars of kombucha going and a half gallon of kimchi in my pantry right now. You are definitely missing out on beneficial bacteria if you don't eat some fermented food. I read somewhere (and I of course forget where) that the stomach and entrails of slain animals were prized by hunter gatherers because they contained partially digested (read: fermented!) plant matter. Yum! Although I'd rather have kimchi.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 19, 2011
at 03:18 AM

just as I was writing the part about the fermented animal guts, I glanced up and read your post-lol. I just read somewhere to be careful to keep your different ferments away from each other to avoid cross fermenting. Have you heard of this?

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on June 20, 2011
at 07:37 AM

Yes, I've heard that. The only things I ferment right now are the kombucha (which you only cover with fabric) and lacto-fermented veggies (which you ferment tightly covered with a lid), so I'm not terribly worried about it. When I was doing raw yogurt and kefir, I kept them away from my kombucha. What do you like to ferment?

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