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Sore feet after short walks

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 12, 2011 at 11:03 PM

I've been prone to sore feet as far as I can remember. I can't walk for more than about half an hour without my feet getting sore, and lately that's been a big problem because I live in an island community where everyone walks everywhere, and parking spaces are few and precious. If I want to run errands, I have to walk half a mile in one direction, make a few stops, walk a mile and a half in another direction, make a few more stops, and then come home... and then I get to stand around cooking if I'm really unlucky. The amount of time I'm able to walk without hurting hasn't increased with time.

The walking-related pain is confined to the soles of my feet, it's like I've just been on them too long. I have a similar problem when standing, although my calves and knees start hurting too. I'm not overweight, I'm pretty sure I'm standing up straight, and there isn't anything wrong with my feet, other than my little toes are turned inward and rest on their sides. This happens whether I'm wearing cushioned shoes or Chuck Taylors or flip-flops. I haven't tried going barefoot and don't have the calluses to do it safely (yet).

Has anyone had a similar problem? Do you have any suggestions for things I can do to decrease soreness?

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on November 29, 2011
at 08:38 PM

I know this is a late comment, but MBTs have changed my life. (not kidding) I have always loved walking, but weight gain, bad posture, and bad shoes had left me unable to walk far at all without pain. I got a pair and it was like night and day. Now I have 4, and my walking posture and gait is much better, even when I don't wear them (though I wear them whenever possible). They are expensive, but worth every penny.

5786a8dbc9f3c6e1b7ec5b46079562ae

(268)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:48 PM

Huh. I wonder if the MBTs mimic a more natural (or so I've heard) rolling-foot gait? I'll go look for them after work some day this week. Thank you!

5786a8dbc9f3c6e1b7ec5b46079562ae

(268)

on March 13, 2011
at 01:00 AM

It's been about six months since I moved here and started walking everywhere, but the soreness has been going on my entire life. The walking thing isn't a muscle soreness, it's more of a pressure pain on the soles of my feet. According to this site (http://www.footcaredirect.com/flatfeet.html) I have normal feet, but only just -- they tend toward flat.

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7 Answers

best answer

0
2b8c327d1296a96ad64cdadc7dffa72d

on March 13, 2011
at 02:26 AM

one way to find out more - if you have a running store that offers gait analysis, that can tell a lot about your stride as well as how you stand. Some foot orthotics shops offer same service. If there isn't one near you, a podiatrist (or physical therapist that specializes in gait analysis) might be of help.

Plantar Fasciitis will really plague your heels more than anything, and usually losing weight and wearing orthotics to retrain your feet (I do not recommend wearing them forever) can help tremendously.

2
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 13, 2011
at 12:54 AM

You may have plantar fascitis. Google the term and see what you find. Take a look at the following and other sites. http://www.plantar-fasciitis.org/

1
39a1a0bc7855c084ac59df60fdf9c0dd

(1505)

on March 14, 2011
at 03:43 PM

I used to have sore feet, and these 2 things took care of it for me:

MBT shoes. Some people say they give your core a workout because you sort of have to balance on them. I don't know whether that's true, but they sure make my feet not hurt! Okay they look funny as heck, but if they mean I walk more, laugh away.

Custom insoles. Yes, these make me feel old, but if you have high arches they may do you a world of good. My podiatrist showed me why my high-end walking shoes aren't as good as I thought they were - and as the price tag might indicate. Most insurance companies will cover at least 1 pair per year, which is good because they're very expensive otherwise.

5786a8dbc9f3c6e1b7ec5b46079562ae

(268)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:48 PM

Huh. I wonder if the MBTs mimic a more natural (or so I've heard) rolling-foot gait? I'll go look for them after work some day this week. Thank you!

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on November 29, 2011
at 08:38 PM

I know this is a late comment, but MBTs have changed my life. (not kidding) I have always loved walking, but weight gain, bad posture, and bad shoes had left me unable to walk far at all without pain. I got a pair and it was like night and day. Now I have 4, and my walking posture and gait is much better, even when I don't wear them (though I wear them whenever possible). They are expensive, but worth every penny.

0
Fc79a04702388b076748c44f6848c6f5

on July 31, 2013
at 09:21 AM

Your problem sound like Plantar Fasciitis and I think you should contact an experienced podiatrist to get treatment for your heel pain as soon as possible. http://www.sydneyheelpain.com.au

0
F1cd291cf9ba1ebd9a9db21d3dd09735

(436)

on March 13, 2011
at 03:09 AM

You could have thin and thinning fat pads. The bottoms of the feet have a fat layer to cushion the bones. It thins with aging, and it has a lot of variability between people.

Been there and done that. ;)

Padded socks and gel inserts may help. I can't wear flip flops so I don't know if they would have enough cushion for you. A deep toe box in a shoe will allow you to add layers of padding without bumping the tops of your toes.

0
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on March 13, 2011
at 02:03 AM

One thing to consider is your stride - like if you have an over pronation issue (your foot does not properly absorb shock if it does not have the right amount of turn in it with each step).

Wikipedia has the best reference I've seen on it https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Foot_type

Shoes to correct for that kind of thing are fairly cheap/common, although its definitely worth looking at how you walk before jumping into new shoes.

0
Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 13, 2011
at 12:08 AM

A few questions to clarify:

Is this something new or something you've always had? Do you have high arches or flat feet?

How long have you been having to stand/walk --e.g. is this a new activity? If so, you might have to get used to it. Whenever I would begin a job that required a lot of standing or walking, my feet, ankles and calves would be very very sore. But you gain strength eventually. Doing some basic yoga (sun salutes) could help stretch and strengthen these muscles and ligaments.

It could also be low magnesium and potassium.

5786a8dbc9f3c6e1b7ec5b46079562ae

(268)

on March 13, 2011
at 01:00 AM

It's been about six months since I moved here and started walking everywhere, but the soreness has been going on my entire life. The walking thing isn't a muscle soreness, it's more of a pressure pain on the soles of my feet. According to this site (http://www.footcaredirect.com/flatfeet.html) I have normal feet, but only just -- they tend toward flat.

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