4

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Foot Arches and Running

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 19, 2011 at 8:30 PM

So Ive been barefoot walking and doing the whole vibram thing for quite a while now. Unfortunately, my feet still fall in when I am standing, so its safe to assume they do when i walk and run. I wouldn't care less other than for aesthetic purposes, but ive isolated my knock knees and hip misalignments to the fallen arches, and did some troubleshooting to prove it to myself. Now that I am trying these foot exercises, should i delay any sprinting until ive done substantial foot rehabilitation, or should i continue my running along with these small exercises? Feel free to provide any experiences people have had with foot arches and overall foot/lower body health.

Thanks

Jamal

17e65d6bd944e44745eaff9e2a56ea51

(10)

on July 21, 2011
at 05:22 AM

Yes, I run on concrete and on trails. You could start doing some short runs in them, working on your technique before progressing to longer runs.

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 02:02 PM

i agree. problem is i went on a trek thru a simple gravel trail cold turkey, and caught shod-withdrawal. though the scrapes and cuts weren't bad, i was a little discouraged at the pace it took to get from one point to the next and back home. so i will have to prepare mentally for my second go at it

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 20, 2011
at 04:01 AM

good question.. And is there any hope for knock-knees? I don't think i was born with em, but i've got it bad now. Can people actually re-align? I've been wondering this for a while, but never researched it.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on July 20, 2011
at 03:25 AM

Since I am just starting out, I have been doing slow runs with Vibrams where the last quarter or so of whatever distance I do is totally barefoot in an attempt to build up some tougher soles. I generally am on concrete most of the time, although I try to run on grass wherever possible near the sidewalk. Concrete IS hard and it IS abrasive, but I think to really get the correct form you need to be able to listen to what your body is telling you. Ken Bob maintains that given proper stimuli you will adjust for the surface, and a lack of information for adjustment just leads to injury.

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 03:10 AM

i have the same question for you as well: do you do this barefoot running on concrete as well? Ive been hesitant to try going running on the asphalt, just because i see it as an artificial surface and unkind to the human foot.

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 02:02 AM

hey i really havent tried running in them since i opt to sprint in the grass barefoot, but thats only like once a week or whenever convienient. do you run on concrete?

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 01:59 AM

haha. So squeezing the ass works? I actually did come across it, but i was afraid creating more imbalances by twisting my legs outward by force.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 20, 2011
at 01:06 AM

Look up Esther Gokhale. She has a great book that I'd recommend but if you can just find a description of how she teaches people to just stand it may help. It's kind of like arching your feet, upward and outward corkscrewing your legs and engaging your glutes (squeeze your ass). Sounds weird but it's easy and it'll help teach your feet to hold good, strong arches if practiced regularly, daily.

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5 Answers

2
A141571ee2453db572c9d3222657bf6b

(756)

on July 19, 2011
at 11:19 PM

ideally you don't want to start using a minimalist shoe during any training at all until you've established and trained yourself completely barefoot first. yes, walking is naturally a heel-strike where running is naturally a fore/midfoot-strike. so running will provide a greater benefit to arch strength. in the mean time my opinion is to do the usual arch exercises with elastics, lose the fivefingers for now, and limit sprinting to light and mild until your strength improves.

1
Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

on July 20, 2011
at 03:23 AM

Are you mainly walking/running on trails and softer ground or on concrete and other artificially hard surfaces? I used to have CONSTANT hip/knee/ankle issues until I stopped running on roads and converted to trail running in Vibrams and the New Balance Minimus. Trails are great for your joints and even better for clearing your mind!

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 02:02 PM

i agree. problem is i went on a trek thru a simple gravel trail cold turkey, and caught shod-withdrawal. though the scrapes and cuts weren't bad, i was a little discouraged at the pace it took to get from one point to the next and back home. so i will have to prepare mentally for my second go at it

1
776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

on July 20, 2011
at 02:52 AM

I second others in reading the Gokhale book - she specifically talks about trying to make feet more kidney shaped and stronger.

I also second another opinion that you should try running actually barefoot and not with the minimalist shoes. The feet are so sensitive and full of nerve endings... truly an amazing organ.

And for my novel contribution I'd just like to add that you should be very wary of correct form while barefoot running, especially if you are trying to correct something. A really excellent book for barefoot running form is "Barefoot Running Step by Step," by Barefoot Ken Bob Saxton. I tried doing jogging while wearing minimalist shoes but found it just as tiresome and exhausting as it had always been, but when I applied some of the techniques in this book, like running with more bent knees, my form seemed to straighten out and running actually became a lot easier.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on July 20, 2011
at 03:25 AM

Since I am just starting out, I have been doing slow runs with Vibrams where the last quarter or so of whatever distance I do is totally barefoot in an attempt to build up some tougher soles. I generally am on concrete most of the time, although I try to run on grass wherever possible near the sidewalk. Concrete IS hard and it IS abrasive, but I think to really get the correct form you need to be able to listen to what your body is telling you. Ken Bob maintains that given proper stimuli you will adjust for the surface, and a lack of information for adjustment just leads to injury.

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 03:10 AM

i have the same question for you as well: do you do this barefoot running on concrete as well? Ive been hesitant to try going running on the asphalt, just because i see it as an artificial surface and unkind to the human foot.

1
17e65d6bd944e44745eaff9e2a56ea51

on July 19, 2011
at 10:44 PM

Walking in Vibrams is quite different than running in them. When you walk in Vibrams you can't help but heel strike, like typical shoes. When you run in them, are you landing on the ball of your feet first or heel striking? How does it feel to run in them? I don't think I'd stop running in them, unless you are experiencing any real problems.

I used to have flat feet, but have been running in Vibrams now for a while and my arches have improved tremendously.

E48833ca4e98b24f35191a02e84cc262

on July 20, 2011
at 02:02 AM

hey i really havent tried running in them since i opt to sprint in the grass barefoot, but thats only like once a week or whenever convienient. do you run on concrete?

17e65d6bd944e44745eaff9e2a56ea51

(10)

on July 21, 2011
at 05:22 AM

Yes, I run on concrete and on trails. You could start doing some short runs in them, working on your technique before progressing to longer runs.

-1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 20, 2011
at 12:20 AM

Hey APC would you recommend doing lots of squats and calf raises barefoot on a concrete floor(been about it for a time and it works quite well). Know any primers for fallen arches? I like to subscribe to the oz. of prevention vs. lb. of cure tenet...

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