0

votes

Why does fat slow down the absorbtion of carbs?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 22, 2012 at 11:35 AM

Thats basically it. We all know, add fat, lower the glycemic index of any carb. Thats why for some crazy reason, ice cream sugars are absorbed slower than starch in white bread (ie lower gi).

How/why does this happen?

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on October 23, 2012
at 11:13 AM

Yeah, I think protein and solid foods would have a similar effect. The "Meals Have Lower GI" section from the same source would support that - "It turns out that the GI of meals is low ??? in fact, it is even lower than the average GI of the foods composing the meal." http://pmid.us/21831990

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 22, 2012
at 11:22 PM

Okay gastric emptying sort of makes sense. But then wouldnt protein have a similar effect (I beleive it slows gastric emptying too at least somewhat)? Also solid foods empty slower than liquid foods. Good answer, cheers.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:41 PM

In physiolgical insulin resistance, there is very little glucose, so the muscle and fat cells "hide" their GLUT4 receptors to spare that small amount for the cells that absolutely require it (some nerve cells and red blood cells).

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:41 PM

This is the best discussion of the topic that I've seen: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2009/09/physiological-insulin-resistance-and.html I do not think it is a long term concern. The mechanism for insulin resistance is different if I'm understanding things correctly. In pathological insulin resistance, your body produces large amounts of insulin to shuttle the large amounts of glucose into your cells. Over time, your GLUT4 receptors get "hard of hearing" and/or your beta cells "burn out" so that you can't produce enough insulin to shuttle away all the glucose.

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:38 PM

If you have to put "Sorry if I'm hijacking this thread..." then you probably are hijacking the thread. Post your own question.

  • Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

    asked by

    (5381)
  • Views
    7.6K
  • Last Activity
    1258D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on October 22, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Here's one explanation ...

How to Minimize Hyperglycemic Toxicity

Fat Reduces GI

J Stanton has noted that adding a little fat to a starch is very effective in lowering its GI. In a post titled ???Fat and Glycemic Index: The Myth of Complex Carbohydrates,??? JS states that:

???Flour tortillas have a GI of 30, compared to a GI of 72 for wheat bread, because tortillas are made with lard.
???Butter reduces the glycemic index of French bread from 95 to 65.
???A Pizza Hut Super Supreme Pizza has a GI of 30, whereas a Vegetarian Supreme has a GI of 49.

JS suggests that the reason fat does this is that it lowers the gastric emptying rate, and cites a study which showed that adding fat to starches could increase the gastric emptying time ??? the time for food to leave the stomach ??? by 50%. [4]

What???s interesting to me here is that what we really care about is not the glycemic index, but the peak blood glucose level attained after a meal. It is blood glucose levels above 140 mg/dl only that are harmful, and the harm is proportional to how high blood glucose levels rise above 140 mg/dl. So it???s the spikes we want to avoid.

But another paper shows that gastric emptying rate is even more closely tied to peak blood glucose level than it is to glycemic index. From [5]:

why-does-fat-slow-down-the-absorbtion-of-carbs?

So combining a starch with fat may reduce peak blood glucose levels even more than it reduces the glycemic index; which is a good thing.

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on October 23, 2012
at 11:13 AM

Yeah, I think protein and solid foods would have a similar effect. The "Meals Have Lower GI" section from the same source would support that - "It turns out that the GI of meals is low ??? in fact, it is even lower than the average GI of the foods composing the meal." http://pmid.us/21831990

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 22, 2012
at 11:22 PM

Okay gastric emptying sort of makes sense. But then wouldnt protein have a similar effect (I beleive it slows gastric emptying too at least somewhat)? Also solid foods empty slower than liquid foods. Good answer, cheers.

0
81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:37 PM

Fats jump to the front of the line in digestion which makes for a slower bowel emptying and slower infusion of sugar into the bloodstream.

-1
Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:25 PM

Can someone also elaborate on how the liver becomes insulin resistant by consuming (especially) saturated fat and if it's something one should worry about long term? Sorry if I'm hijacking the thread, but I think the question is somewhat related as we're talking about the absorption of fat and carbs.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:41 PM

In physiolgical insulin resistance, there is very little glucose, so the muscle and fat cells "hide" their GLUT4 receptors to spare that small amount for the cells that absolutely require it (some nerve cells and red blood cells).

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:38 PM

If you have to put "Sorry if I'm hijacking this thread..." then you probably are hijacking the thread. Post your own question.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on October 22, 2012
at 02:41 PM

This is the best discussion of the topic that I've seen: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2009/09/physiological-insulin-resistance-and.html I do not think it is a long term concern. The mechanism for insulin resistance is different if I'm understanding things correctly. In pathological insulin resistance, your body produces large amounts of insulin to shuttle the large amounts of glucose into your cells. Over time, your GLUT4 receptors get "hard of hearing" and/or your beta cells "burn out" so that you can't produce enough insulin to shuttle away all the glucose.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!