1

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Which is the best fat to render?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 06, 2011 at 10:07 PM

I think all our meat is grass fed, but I was just wondering, as i cannot seem to buy lard here, and I thought I would try rendering my own fat in a crock pot, would one be best to use beef, pork or mutton fat for rendering.

I have to source my fat yet, but at least asking here first I would know what to ask for!

Kit

65333605eb0e62ccdb9ffaac00727bc6

(150)

on September 11, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I love how you had to split that into two posts...It seemed like a dramatic pause... Things may get.............a little stinky! :0

Ab566019baa884ec9e3327c108586ff8

(1055)

on April 07, 2011
at 12:30 PM

Nice - thanks for the step by step via pics!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 07, 2011
at 10:43 AM

Its always good idea to mince fat before rendering, better yield :)

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:21 AM

I guess that would make sense, the meat cooking part. Thanks! I'm gonna try this (my stash is very low).

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:18 AM

Anyone know why my image won't embed? Is flickr somehow preventing it?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:15 AM

Thanks! Concerning a double boiler, I don't think it would work. It won't get hot enough. Sure it will melt the fat, but it won't actually render, which is boiling off water and cooking the raw meat.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:11 AM

neato. just looked at your pics, I've been wanting to try this when my stash of good lard runs out. Curious though, do you think it would work with a double boiler method, like the kind you'd use to melt chocolate, instead of the water in the pot?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 02:48 AM

oh yeah, the legs are sizeable, usually we have one each for dinner along with some veg and its plenty. Bones are saved to add to our chicken stock pile.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 02:44 AM

yes yes and yes again. by the way, you can get really quite outstanding duck confit from Hudson Valley Foie Gras. Shipping is expensive but you can buy in bulk and they also sell buckets of duck fat. Having worked at a really awesome french restaurant, i can say that its pretty darn great. It comes fully cooked (due to the nature of making confit) so all you have to do is fry it up in some duck fat for that crispy delicious skin and unctuous inside. Yes unctuous. we've been living in a food desert lately, and this duck confit has saved my happiness.

Af2ad65226384cedd4f5f08825a75b5d

(665)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:56 AM

a lot of people don't like mutton tallow...

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:04 AM

... a little stinky!

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:03 AM

I rendered lard a few months ago, came out great! I chopped it up into small pieces and put it in the crockpot on low (with about half cup of water) for a few hours. I strained it and then put the cracklins back in to render a second time for a couple more hours until they got golden brown. The lard from the first rendering will taste more neutral, and the lard from the second rendering will taste more porky. I used leaf fat though, which I think is more neutral-tasting by nature than fat from other parts of the pig. Oh, and do it on a nice day so you can open some windows- things may get

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9 Answers

2
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:52 AM

its not even close......Duck is ridculous. Duck confit is paleo orgasm.....dont believe me go to the nearest French restaurant and order it once.....and come tell me. CALL ME TOO.....I WANT SOME MORE!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 02:48 AM

oh yeah, the legs are sizeable, usually we have one each for dinner along with some veg and its plenty. Bones are saved to add to our chicken stock pile.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 02:44 AM

yes yes and yes again. by the way, you can get really quite outstanding duck confit from Hudson Valley Foie Gras. Shipping is expensive but you can buy in bulk and they also sell buckets of duck fat. Having worked at a really awesome french restaurant, i can say that its pretty darn great. It comes fully cooked (due to the nature of making confit) so all you have to do is fry it up in some duck fat for that crispy delicious skin and unctuous inside. Yes unctuous. we've been living in a food desert lately, and this duck confit has saved my happiness.

2
91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

on April 06, 2011
at 10:58 PM

I've never rendered lamb/mutton suet, but I regularly render beef tallow and lard - the process itself is not at all dissimilar, although you get slightly different results; tallow is hard at room temperature (more saturated fat), and lard will remain solid but soft, even refrigerated (more monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats). Lard definitely has a more delicate taste, and I find it is interchangeable with butter in many dishes. Tallow has a more distinct flavor and is excellent for deep-fat frying or browning beef at higher temperatures.

1
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on April 07, 2011
at 09:59 AM

I render pork fat often. It is organic and free! from my local organic pig farm. I put it through a mincer (grinder) and tip the resulting mass into a slow cooker, switch it on low and leave it until it is clear and the little pieces of fat don't look as though they have much more to give up.

It is a sort of lemony colour hot, but cools down to a pure white lard - delicious.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 07, 2011
at 10:43 AM

Its always good idea to mince fat before rendering, better yield :)

1
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on April 07, 2011
at 03:56 AM

Just for Paleo Hackers, I've posted a step-by-step to flickr. Enjoy.

which-is-the-best-fat-to-render?

And for my non-paleo friends I've used lard in the catholic sense, so please don't get pedantic in the comments. :-) Thanks.

Ab566019baa884ec9e3327c108586ff8

(1055)

on April 07, 2011
at 12:30 PM

Nice - thanks for the step by step via pics!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:15 AM

Thanks! Concerning a double boiler, I don't think it would work. It won't get hot enough. Sure it will melt the fat, but it won't actually render, which is boiling off water and cooking the raw meat.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:21 AM

I guess that would make sense, the meat cooking part. Thanks! I'm gonna try this (my stash is very low).

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:18 AM

Anyone know why my image won't embed? Is flickr somehow preventing it?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 07, 2011
at 04:11 AM

neato. just looked at your pics, I've been wanting to try this when my stash of good lard runs out. Curious though, do you think it would work with a double boiler method, like the kind you'd use to melt chocolate, instead of the water in the pot?

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on April 06, 2011
at 10:35 PM

Cow or lamb suet gives you tallow, and pig fat gives you lard. Tallow and lard are two different products with different flavors, and I don't consider one better than the other (but I've never tried lamb tallow).

I've made tallow from cow suet once. All I did was put it my slowcooker for about 12 hours. It came out good for my first time.

1
Ab566019baa884ec9e3327c108586ff8

(1055)

on April 06, 2011
at 10:26 PM

Wow,..I was literally typing a very similar question when I saw yours pop up - figured I should erase mine. I just spent several hours sorting through two sets of pig goodies from a butcher for raw feeding the dogs and have a couple bowls full of fat. Have never rendered before was thinking of trying.

Anyone any tips or websites you like about rendering fat?

which-is-the-best-fat-to-render?

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:03 AM

I rendered lard a few months ago, came out great! I chopped it up into small pieces and put it in the crockpot on low (with about half cup of water) for a few hours. I strained it and then put the cracklins back in to render a second time for a couple more hours until they got golden brown. The lard from the first rendering will taste more neutral, and the lard from the second rendering will taste more porky. I used leaf fat though, which I think is more neutral-tasting by nature than fat from other parts of the pig. Oh, and do it on a nice day so you can open some windows- things may get

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:04 AM

... a little stinky!

65333605eb0e62ccdb9ffaac00727bc6

(150)

on September 11, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I love how you had to split that into two posts...It seemed like a dramatic pause... Things may get.............a little stinky! :0

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 07, 2011
at 08:21 AM

Duck fat is great stuff, especially cooking organ meats, well, for cooking everything! :) In beef ,for nutrition, pastured marrow fat must be the best stuff. Its softer than muscle fat so its easier to get out of jar fridge cold :)

0
D38c0cc994b194de08289e0fe3f99d1e

(421)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:58 AM

I render beef suet to tallow regularly. I chop it up into chuncks smaller than 1" sqaure, toss in large soup pot, and pop in the oven at ~245 degrees F. In ~12+ hours the pieces of fat will have turned brown and sunk and any water will have evaporated. Don't go over this temp or the cracklings will burn and impart a burnt popcorn like flavor in the tallow. Then, just filter through paper towel with a funnel as you pour it off into containers.

0
Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 07, 2011
at 01:05 AM

I recently rendered beef suet to get some tallow for the first time. It struck me halfway through that rendering fat is basically distillation but one phase down, solid to liquid separation rather than liquid to gas separation. Kinda cool.

Anyway, the way I rendered the suet was to cut it in a semi-frozen state into half inch cubes. This took at least 30 minutes with about 5 or 6 lbs. or suet. Don't try shredding it in a food processor. It turned my processor into a paperweight and the motor into shrapnel. Just cut it by hand. Next, just toss it on the stove near the lowest setting or in the oven at about 200 degrees F and wait until the suet reduces into a shriveled, brown cracklin'. At this point, you've got about all the fat rendered from the surrounding connective tissue that you can possibly separate. Just strain the contents of the pot/pan into your storage container, and voila, you have the best possible cooking fat for vegetables. The rendering took somewhere between an hour and 2 hours. I ended up with maybe 4 or 5 cups of tallow from 5ish lbs. I made a Thai coconut curry out of beef and vegetables roasted in the tallow tonight. Un-goddamn-believable. Totally worth the rendering process. Plus, it smelled amazing the whole time it was rendering. They should make a beef tallow Yankee candle.

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