2

votes

Where does unused saturated fat go?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 03, 2013 at 2:15 AM

Here's something I've been wondering.

Excess sugar = insulin = storing excess sugar as body fat.

So lets say you eat too much saturated fat. Your body uses it for what it needs, but then where does the excess go?

Does it somehow get turned into body fat? And if so, how?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 07:50 PM

OK! Found one free reference: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00481511 Steatorhhea is defined as over 20% fat in stools. So the 20-25% reference above is apparently too high to be a normal level. Now that's something new to ask for at your annual check-up. With that info you could see what changing to, or away from, a high fat diet does to you.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 06:52 PM

Of course mscott but I was trying to cut to the chase in a hurry. The citations I could find were abstracts, and I didn't want to spend time and money chasing % fat content in stools. In a separate thread, this wiki entry has already been linked by raydawg.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on September 03, 2013
at 06:43 PM

Uncited wikipedia entries are totally reliable amirite?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 05:49 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steatorrhea The condition of passing high amounts of fat undigested is called steatorrhea. Wiki mentions that the paleo diet can be a cause for steatorrhea.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 04:18 PM

Fat digests slowly - 6 hours or so - and 20-25% of feces are fat. In a mixed diet, and not eaten excessively, fat is digested efficiently. But if overeaten on a high % fat diet like Atkins much more of it hits the toilet. I can't find corresponding research papers for this but I'll keep looking.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:42 PM

A "considerable" amount goes undigested? Really?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:40 PM

@jake, he's been reading Taubes…

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:36 PM

Raw vegans eat lots of calories that aren't bioavailable because of cell matrices prevent digestion. It's not because of some "magic" ratio they have.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:20 PM

IT could be looked into

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:19 PM

If raw vegans can eat thousands upon thousands of calories and not gain weight because of the minuscule amounts of fat they take in then why couldn't there be some reaction in the body that works the other way with fat. I'm not saying its true but I could be looked into

50ef4a664144b97faa37430916739309

on September 03, 2013
at 10:59 AM

Well... studies are handy where available. To clarify, paint94979 may be referring to the fact that insulin activates lipoprotein lipase for either storage (adipose) or energy (muscles) - depending on insulin level, diet and time since last meal. So strictly speaking both insulin and conversion (reesterification) are involved in the storage of fat. But Rob2 is right that lipids that have entered the bloodstream don't get excreted by the kidneys. The body assumes that the excess energy will be needed for next winter famine or savannah drought.

Ee6932fe54ad68039a8d5f7a8caa0468

(2668)

on September 03, 2013
at 04:17 AM

paint94979, you don't need studies to back up this "claim." dietary fat that's not burned for energy is stored as fat. if that even seems controversial... i don't know what to tell you.

Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

(559)

on September 03, 2013
at 03:45 AM

Really huh? Studies to backup your claim?

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4 Answers

best answer

3
50ef4a664144b97faa37430916739309

on September 03, 2013
at 02:44 AM

Dietary fat in the blood stream is generally indistinguishable from lipids released by fat cells. Under healthy metabolic conditions, fatty acids should cycle in and out of adipose tissue; acting as an energy buffer.

Articles that specifically describe the mechanism are a little thin on the ground. This article and its references mention a rather complicated process involving lipoprotein lipase.

Free fatty acids play an unclear role in hormone signalling. On the long run, your appetite either decreases or your desire expend energy increases. Some dietary fat might not be absorbed by intestines (and simply excreted) if the lipid blood concentration is high enough, but I couldn't find any clear proof of this in this overview.

2
27cede61306f3e0691b4ac1f99ac782e

(20)

on September 03, 2013
at 03:36 AM

It's simple. It goes into adipose tissue, no conversion required. You can store fat without insulin. It doesn't magically evaporate.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:20 PM

IT could be looked into

50ef4a664144b97faa37430916739309

on September 03, 2013
at 10:59 AM

Well... studies are handy where available. To clarify, paint94979 may be referring to the fact that insulin activates lipoprotein lipase for either storage (adipose) or energy (muscles) - depending on insulin level, diet and time since last meal. So strictly speaking both insulin and conversion (reesterification) are involved in the storage of fat. But Rob2 is right that lipids that have entered the bloodstream don't get excreted by the kidneys. The body assumes that the excess energy will be needed for next winter famine or savannah drought.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:19 PM

If raw vegans can eat thousands upon thousands of calories and not gain weight because of the minuscule amounts of fat they take in then why couldn't there be some reaction in the body that works the other way with fat. I'm not saying its true but I could be looked into

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:40 PM

@jake, he's been reading Taubes…

Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

(559)

on September 03, 2013
at 03:45 AM

Really huh? Studies to backup your claim?

Ee6932fe54ad68039a8d5f7a8caa0468

(2668)

on September 03, 2013
at 04:17 AM

paint94979, you don't need studies to back up this "claim." dietary fat that's not burned for energy is stored as fat. if that even seems controversial... i don't know what to tell you.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:36 PM

Raw vegans eat lots of calories that aren't bioavailable because of cell matrices prevent digestion. It's not because of some "magic" ratio they have.

1
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:35 PM

If you're like me, a lot of it goes right through me! Some fat isn't used at all. A lot is broken down and stored, but not all.

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:26 PM

Excess blood sugar is not stored as fat because it's not fat. The liver can convert blood sugar to fat, but dietary fat is what is usually stored. The rate of storage is probably higher when blood sugar and triglycerides levels are high.

Excess dietary saturated fat would probably be stored if it gets to the bloodstream. A considerable amount of it shoots through the GI tract undigested.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:42 PM

A "considerable" amount goes undigested? Really?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on September 03, 2013
at 06:43 PM

Uncited wikipedia entries are totally reliable amirite?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 07:50 PM

OK! Found one free reference: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00481511 Steatorhhea is defined as over 20% fat in stools. So the 20-25% reference above is apparently too high to be a normal level. Now that's something new to ask for at your annual check-up. With that info you could see what changing to, or away from, a high fat diet does to you.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 06:52 PM

Of course mscott but I was trying to cut to the chase in a hurry. The citations I could find were abstracts, and I didn't want to spend time and money chasing % fat content in stools. In a separate thread, this wiki entry has already been linked by raydawg.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 04:18 PM

Fat digests slowly - 6 hours or so - and 20-25% of feces are fat. In a mixed diet, and not eaten excessively, fat is digested efficiently. But if overeaten on a high % fat diet like Atkins much more of it hits the toilet. I can't find corresponding research papers for this but I'll keep looking.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 03, 2013
at 05:49 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steatorrhea The condition of passing high amounts of fat undigested is called steatorrhea. Wiki mentions that the paleo diet can be a cause for steatorrhea.

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