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What other fats are there?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 14, 2011 at 12:02 AM

I was reading a food label. It said: Total Fat - 31g Sat Fat - 12g PUFA - 0g MUFA - 0g Trans - 0g

What makes up the other 19g?

In researching this question, I found this at Mayo Clinic website...comments?

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fat/NU00262

Harmful dietary fat The two main types of potentially harmful dietary fat:

Saturated fat. This is a type of fat that comes mainly from animal sources of food. Saturated fat raises total blood cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, which can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Saturated fat may also increase your risk of type 2 diabetes.

Trans fat. This is a type of fat that occurs naturally in some foods, especially foods from animals. But most trans fats are made during food processing through partial hydrogenation of unsaturated fats. This process creates fats that are easier to cook with and less likely to spoil than are naturally occurring oils. These trans fats are called industrial or synthetic trans fats. Research studies show that synthetic trans fat can increase unhealthy LDL cholesterol and lower healthy high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. This can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Most fats that have a high percentage of saturated fat or trans fat are solid at room temperature. Because of this, they're typically referred to as solid fats. They include beef fat, pork fat, shortening, stick margarine and butter.

Healthier dietary fat The two main types of potentially helpful dietary fat:

Monounsaturated fat. This is a type of fat found in a variety of foods and oils. Studies show that eating foods rich in monounsaturated fats (MUFAs) improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease. Research also shows that MUFAs may benefit insulin levels and blood sugar control, which can be especially helpful if you have type 2 diabetes. Polyunsaturated fat. This is a type of fat found mostly in plant-based foods and oils. Evidence shows that eating foods rich in polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease. PUFAs may also help decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. One type of polyunsaturated fat, omega-3 fatty acids, may be especially beneficial to your heart. Omega-3s, found in some types of fatty fish, appear to decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. They may also protect against irregular heartbeats

3f991b9d02d2c9b8bd91f93fdd88febc

(194)

on November 14, 2011
at 05:19 AM

I was trying to convince a friend that these Costco treats weren't worth eating: From Myfitnesspal.com Backyard Grill - Bacon & Cheddar Cheese Seasoned Beef Patties Servings: 1 Patty 1 container (4 patties ea.) Calories 370 Sodium 1150 mg Total Fat 26 g Potassium 0 mg Saturated 12 g Total Carbs 3 g Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 0 g Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 1 g Trans 0 g Protein 31 g Cholesterol 100 mg Vitamin A 4% Calcium 10% Vitamin C 0% Iron 10% *Percent

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 14, 2011
at 03:55 AM

That's possible. I don't know what the food in question is. However, this does explain why the numbers don't always add up which was the original question.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on November 14, 2011
at 03:20 AM

What was the food? at this stage, i'd tend to agree with Matt (below); its a label error. Stick the food in to nutritiondata.com & see what fat info it gives. It may or may not match the label. & nutritiondata will also give you more fat info than is shown on the label.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 14, 2011
at 03:01 AM

I really doubt that the other "fatty substances" are making up nearly 2/3s of the fat content in whatever he's eating. My guess is a labeling error.

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1 Answers

1
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 14, 2011
at 12:39 AM

I think this article will answer your question. Basically, there are other fatty substances (phospholipids, glycerol and sterols) which are included in the total fats, but not in any of the fatty acid counts.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 14, 2011
at 03:55 AM

That's possible. I don't know what the food in question is. However, this does explain why the numbers don't always add up which was the original question.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 14, 2011
at 03:01 AM

I really doubt that the other "fatty substances" are making up nearly 2/3s of the fat content in whatever he's eating. My guess is a labeling error.

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