3

votes

Trans fat in full fat dairy?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 12, 2010 at 10:57 PM

Hey guys,

I bought some full-fat Greek style Trader Joes yogurt. A few questions:

Should I be worried about the 1g of trans fat, or is that the natural kind? Should I be concerned that it's "greek style" rather than greek itself? Any big difference?

Thanks!

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on August 05, 2010
at 04:04 PM

yes, I see that they have a blueberry now - I can't eat them but my son likes it

F3951b3141a6ab7036b33e70b4bfad71

(269)

on August 04, 2010
at 09:20 PM

Unless it is the Total Honey variety, their regular Total's do not have honey...

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on August 03, 2010
at 06:13 PM

Hey, Matthew, I agree with that (your comment about not much point), but the 161 for 15 seconds is not what I read to be the appropriate time/temperature for pasteurization of raw milk. In any case, I was getting way too little yogurt for the amount of milk I was using, and the leftover whey doesn't agree with me much, so I have come up with some other methods that are more satisfactory to me and don't require me to buy $8/gallon milk and throw half or more than half of it away.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on August 03, 2010
at 03:57 PM

If it is TJ it is not real Greek Yogurt- read the label. And No Fage has no honey in their yogurt

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 03, 2010
at 02:16 PM

Don't sign your posts here with "board certified nutritionist", those credentials are meaningless here and will probably garner you some resentment.

1340fe0b7e7b01683ea33042092e05d6

(1693)

on August 03, 2010
at 12:02 PM

I am sorry L. Larsen, but you couldn't be MORE incorrect.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on August 03, 2010
at 10:44 AM

gharkness: There is not much point buying expensive raw milk if you are pasturise it yourself. Most milk is pasturised by heating it to 161 F for 15 seconds.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 03, 2010
at 09:53 AM

Copyright issues ? Mine is "Greek style" and has 10g of fat and no extra ingredients, just "yogurt". Also don't all "real" greek style yogurts have honey in them ?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 03, 2010
at 09:39 AM

Also from an interview with her from Life enthusiast website: "There have always been small amounts of one kind of trans fatty acids in the human diet from the ruminant fats (dairy, sheep, goat, deer, buffalo, antelope, etc.) because the microorganisms" http://www.life-enthusiast.com/index/Articles/Enig/Trans_Fats:_Health_Risks_and_Dangers Plus from Dairy products in human health and nutrition: proceedings of the 1st World - M. Serrano-Ríos,A. Sastre, page 256 "In butter, for example, total trans fatty acids vary from >1 to about 4% of total fatty acids (Brisson, 1981, Enig et al. 1983,.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 03, 2010
at 09:37 AM

Hm, could you provide any reference for the claim "There are no trans fat in dairy". http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/90/1/88 "The 2 major dietary sources of trans fatty acids (TFAs) are partially hydrogenated oils and ruminant-derived products" I quickly skimmed through some Google on Mary Enig and she mostly talks about "liquid vegetable oils and margarine".

C8521a858edd480815a55f683afff86a

(2065)

on April 14, 2010
at 05:21 AM

There absolutely is such a thing as natural trans fat and it is found in dairy fat. It is nothing like man-made trans fat and is no cause for concern. I would be more concerned about ingredient #3-nonfat milk, that will no doubt be powdered milk, which is carcinogenic and oxidized.

36dd8a49324c45fb49a38765000eca1e

(377)

on April 13, 2010
at 08:49 PM

Like its name implies, "farmer's cheese" is cheese, not yogurt.

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on April 13, 2010
at 04:47 PM

If the ingredients are just whole milk and active cultures, it should be fine. If it's low-fat, or contains any additives...not so much.

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on April 13, 2010
at 04:43 PM

I only heat my raw milk to about 100', and I do sometimes strain my yogurt too. I don't worry about it, and I've never had a problem. I am on a cowshare though - I know my farmer - I'm not buying at a supermarket.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on April 13, 2010
at 04:35 PM

Better yet, make your own yogurt from raw milk, then strain it. Let me mention, though, I always bring my raw milk to 185 degrees and hold it for five minutes. I am pretty sure it's possible to heat it to a lower temperature for a longer time, but I do want to make certain there are no "bad" bacteria to interfere with the good, especially since I tend to drain it outside the fridge for ~24 hours after chilling the homemade yogurt.

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8 Answers

best answer

2
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on April 13, 2010
at 01:54 AM

You can make your own "greek" yogurt at home very??easily. Get a quart of (preferably) raw, full-fat yogurt which will be a bit runny. Line a colander with rinsed cheesecloth. Dump yogurt into lined colander and set it in a big bowl then put the whole mess into the fridge overnight. In the morning you will have a nice big lump of "greek" yogurt (aka farmer's cheese) and whey liquid in the bowl. You may need to dump the whey (or drink it, up to you) a few times depending on the source. The resulting cheese/yogurt lump can be easily peeled off the cheesecloth and eaten.

36dd8a49324c45fb49a38765000eca1e

(377)

on April 13, 2010
at 08:49 PM

Like its name implies, "farmer's cheese" is cheese, not yogurt.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on April 13, 2010
at 04:35 PM

Better yet, make your own yogurt from raw milk, then strain it. Let me mention, though, I always bring my raw milk to 185 degrees and hold it for five minutes. I am pretty sure it's possible to heat it to a lower temperature for a longer time, but I do want to make certain there are no "bad" bacteria to interfere with the good, especially since I tend to drain it outside the fridge for ~24 hours after chilling the homemade yogurt.

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on April 13, 2010
at 04:43 PM

I only heat my raw milk to about 100', and I do sometimes strain my yogurt too. I don't worry about it, and I've never had a problem. I am on a cowshare though - I know my farmer - I'm not buying at a supermarket.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on August 03, 2010
at 10:44 AM

gharkness: There is not much point buying expensive raw milk if you are pasturise it yourself. Most milk is pasturised by heating it to 161 F for 15 seconds.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on August 03, 2010
at 06:13 PM

Hey, Matthew, I agree with that (your comment about not much point), but the 161 for 15 seconds is not what I read to be the appropriate time/temperature for pasteurization of raw milk. In any case, I was getting way too little yogurt for the amount of milk I was using, and the leftover whey doesn't agree with me much, so I have come up with some other methods that are more satisfactory to me and don't require me to buy $8/gallon milk and throw half or more than half of it away.

3
0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on April 13, 2010
at 12:42 AM

"In Western Europe and the U.S., the term "Greek yoghurt" has come to mean strained yoghurt. "Greek-style" yoghurts are similar to Greek strained yoghurt, but may be thickened with thickening agents,[3] or if made the traditional way, are based on domestic (rather than Greek) milk."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_Yogurt

2
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 13, 2010
at 12:45 AM

This is NOT real greek yogurt- just a greek STYLE. Buy the real thing and get good dairy fat if that is what you want. I use fage for the diary fat i want.

F3951b3141a6ab7036b33e70b4bfad71

(269)

on August 04, 2010
at 09:20 PM

Unless it is the Total Honey variety, their regular Total's do not have honey...

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 03, 2010
at 09:53 AM

Copyright issues ? Mine is "Greek style" and has 10g of fat and no extra ingredients, just "yogurt". Also don't all "real" greek style yogurts have honey in them ?

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on August 05, 2010
at 04:04 PM

yes, I see that they have a blueberry now - I can't eat them but my son likes it

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on August 03, 2010
at 03:57 PM

If it is TJ it is not real Greek Yogurt- read the label. And No Fage has no honey in their yogurt

1
Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 14, 2011
at 10:52 PM

There is a small amount of naturally occurring trans fat in cow's milk called vaccenic acid. You possess an enzyme to isomerise (convert to a cis fat) this particular trans fat, so it does not cause typical neolithic trans fatty acid problems.

1
1340fe0b7e7b01683ea33042092e05d6

on August 03, 2010
at 11:59 AM

The trans fat that is listed on the back of the yogurt is more than likely the naturally occurring Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA).

Disregard what the "board certified nutritionist" states as he has discredited his very profession and personal knowledge by stating what he did in his very first post, but CLA is found in abundance in grass-fed beef, dairy, and other ruminants. It has significant anti-cancer properties among other attributes that are positive to health.

But do not go out and buy "CLA" supplements though :)

0
0d821bf7d4028b84a6838062db0e9ce0

(754)

on April 13, 2010
at 03:51 PM

I have some in my fridge here's the ingredients (I don't think there is such a thing as natural trans fat! ) Trader Joe's Greek style yogurt (1g trans fat per Cup)

  1. Cultured grade A pasteurized milk
  2. Cream
  3. nonfat milk
  4. live and active cultures (cultured after pasteurization) S. Thermophilus, L. Bulgaricus , Lacidophilus, Bifidus

also got some Fage total (0g trans fat per 5 oz)

  1. Strained Yogurt (grade A pasteurized milk, and Cream)
  2. Live active cultures: S. Thermophilus, L. Bulgaricus

bet the trans fat is an additive in the nonfat milk in the TJ's one, thank god I can get full fat fage at Harris teeter and whole foods around here (TJ stopped carrying the full fat fage at my location for some reason.)

C8521a858edd480815a55f683afff86a

(2065)

on April 14, 2010
at 05:21 AM

There absolutely is such a thing as natural trans fat and it is found in dairy fat. It is nothing like man-made trans fat and is no cause for concern. I would be more concerned about ingredient #3-nonfat milk, that will no doubt be powdered milk, which is carcinogenic and oxidized.

0
15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on April 13, 2010
at 03:34 PM

Check the ingredients. If it's just dairy, it's natural trans fat. If they put some other oils in there, don't eat it.

-4
93ebd6ba863a72ed2f43a6754240c2a3

on August 03, 2010
at 09:06 AM

Trans fat means fats that have been hydrogenated by changing their molecular structure. They are foreign to the human anatomy and are very difficult to digest and cause all kinds of problems and are highly susceptible to rancidity and becoming free radicals. There are no trans fats in dairy. Dairy products have a natural fat that is easily broken down in the body. Also, remember that saturated only means not liquid at room temperature. It tells us nothing about its advantages or disadvantages but serves to confuse people by making them think that all saturated fats are the same. Therefore all saturated fats are bad. Hydrogenated fats are made from liquid vegetable oils and are "saturated" to make them more like natural fats such as butter or lard. Butter and lard are full of vitamin A and D and are extremely vital to good health. Read the works of Mary Enig, Biochemist and International Expert on Fats to understand trans fats further.

  • L. Larsen Board Certified Nutritionist

1340fe0b7e7b01683ea33042092e05d6

(1693)

on August 03, 2010
at 12:02 PM

I am sorry L. Larsen, but you couldn't be MORE incorrect.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 03, 2010
at 02:16 PM

Don't sign your posts here with "board certified nutritionist", those credentials are meaningless here and will probably garner you some resentment.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 03, 2010
at 09:39 AM

Also from an interview with her from Life enthusiast website: "There have always been small amounts of one kind of trans fatty acids in the human diet from the ruminant fats (dairy, sheep, goat, deer, buffalo, antelope, etc.) because the microorganisms" http://www.life-enthusiast.com/index/Articles/Enig/Trans_Fats:_Health_Risks_and_Dangers Plus from Dairy products in human health and nutrition: proceedings of the 1st World - M. Serrano-Ríos,A. Sastre, page 256 "In butter, for example, total trans fatty acids vary from >1 to about 4% of total fatty acids (Brisson, 1981, Enig et al. 1983,.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 03, 2010
at 09:37 AM

Hm, could you provide any reference for the claim "There are no trans fat in dairy". http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/90/1/88 "The 2 major dietary sources of trans fatty acids (TFAs) are partially hydrogenated oils and ruminant-derived products" I quickly skimmed through some Google on Mary Enig and she mostly talks about "liquid vegetable oils and margarine".

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