0

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to ghee or not to ghee

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 10, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Need I include ghee in my diet? Will I get enough vitamin K without ghee? Do leafy greens and vegetables provide adequate vitamin K? I know this vitamin has been getting a lot of attention recently in the treatment of bone related diseases like osteoporosis...

977d98d9ee4a3edba0141c0b3aa018a7

(243)

on March 26, 2013
at 03:02 PM

What kind of jackass scientist would differentiate between two different vitamins by adding a number.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 14, 2013
at 04:05 PM

Not the same vit K. Spinach is full of K1, which is different than K2.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 14, 2013
at 10:42 AM

Source ?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 14, 2013
at 04:32 AM

Just so ya know, cheese is largely mk-8 and 9, not 7.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 14, 2013
at 04:11 AM

FWIW, butter is a terrible source of vitamin K per calorie. Aged cheese is exponentially better.

977d98d9ee4a3edba0141c0b3aa018a7

(243)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:32 PM

This answer is better than mine, ha.

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on January 10, 2013
at 10:35 PM

Here is a nice explanation of M4 vs M7: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/03/are-mk-4-and-mk-7-forms-of-vitamin-k2.html

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7 Answers

2
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:27 PM

Vitamin k2 been getting a lot of attention recently in the treatment of bone related diseases like osteoporosis. Leafy greens and vegetables provide adequate k1 and no k2. Cheese NAtto and goose liver are good sources of k2. Goose liver has k2mk4 and cheese and NAtto have the k2mk7 version of vitamin k2. Ghee should have the k2mk4 butin very small quantities, probably negligible.

977d98d9ee4a3edba0141c0b3aa018a7

(243)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:32 PM

This answer is better than mine, ha.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 14, 2013
at 04:32 AM

Just so ya know, cheese is largely mk-8 and 9, not 7.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 14, 2013
at 10:42 AM

Source ?

1
C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

on March 14, 2013
at 03:51 PM

I'm going to add a little more to UncleLongHair's & Robin's point that has nothing to do with vitamins. Ghee is good to cook with, and the reason it is mentioned often in the Paleo community is because it has the sometimes-problematic dairy proteins skimmed off/out of it. That is why programs like Whole30 that recommend the temporary elimination of dairy products suggest ghee in cooking (it is considered dairy-free).

I always like to switch up the cooking oils (coconut oil, ghee, lard, fat), and sometimes they others are not appropriate. If I want the buttery taste, I will opt for ghee. If I want a bacon-y taste, I will opt for bacon fat. You get the point.

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on March 14, 2013
at 12:18 PM

As long as you're eating a lot of green leafy things (in conjunction with fat, which helps to absorb the vitamins), you're probably getting a lot of vitamin K. You should type what you eat into fitday.com or similar and it will tell you. Unless you're really loading it on, the little bit of oil or fat that you use for cooking probably won't make a huge difference in your nutrition.

That said, I like cooking with ghee because it's delicious, helps foods to brown, but doesn't burn or smoke as easily as butter, and the stuff I buy is shelf stable (don't need to refrigerate). I found some organic ghee at my local market and it's kind of expensive (about $8 for about 10oz) but lasts a while and is great.

1
77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on March 14, 2013
at 07:27 AM

Just came onto paleohacks and saw my old question pop up haha. Funny enough I just ordered thorne vitamin k2 from amazon. Ill post back on its effects in a couple weeks.

1
399f81e0a0f8907ea14accfd4c1dde49

on March 14, 2013
at 03:13 AM

Oxacate in greens like raw spinach, chard and beat greens may lock away thing like VK and calcium. Vitamin c helps to break this down

spinach salad with orange vinaigrette anyone?

1
977d98d9ee4a3edba0141c0b3aa018a7

on January 10, 2013
at 11:21 PM

One cup of raw spinach gets you 181% of your DI of Vitamin K, so you're probably not deficient on Paleo.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2626/2

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 14, 2013
at 04:05 PM

Not the same vit K. Spinach is full of K1, which is different than K2.

977d98d9ee4a3edba0141c0b3aa018a7

(243)

on March 26, 2013
at 03:02 PM

What kind of jackass scientist would differentiate between two different vitamins by adding a number.

0
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on January 10, 2013
at 10:33 PM

You might want to look at this conversation:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/26159/how-much-k2-is-in-grass-fed-butter#axzz2Hc9QuDOk

So K2 varies based on all sorts of factors, and there won't likely be much in your ghee unless it's from pastured cows. I figure I'm getting some K2 from the Organic Valley pastured butter, and more from some aged cheeses, plus the cod liver oil/butter oil caps from Green Pastures that I take in the winter.

I just use ghee because it's good for cooking at high temps when I don't want the flavor of lard or bacon fat.

(oh, and meant to say that the K you're getting from veggies is totally different from the K you're getting from butter -- M4 vs M7 or something, I've forgotten the numbers)

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on January 10, 2013
at 10:35 PM

Here is a nice explanation of M4 vs M7: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/03/are-mk-4-and-mk-7-forms-of-vitamin-k2.html

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