1

votes

Teach me how to eat red meat.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 31, 2012 at 11:59 AM

I was raised to never eat red meat, just chicken and pork. I spent a few (terrible) years as a vegetarian. I love being Paleo but am having issues getting enough fat in my diet. I look at the beef in the grocery store and just feel overwhelmed! What are some inexpensive cuts of meat/steaks that are fairly versatile and easy to find?

121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

(1327)

on May 31, 2012
at 06:43 PM

The pressure cooker. The most underrated and sadly underused cooking implement in culinary history.

4929a87e3f7438f18a0afbdde291ed5e

(752)

on May 31, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Buy a pressure cooker and cook the chuck roast in there in chunks after you sear it in coconut oil (or ghee). A pressure cooker has been a life-saver for me in preparing large amounts of cheaper-cut meats (pork and beef). It also tends to break down the proteins a bit and make it easier to digest the beef - at least in my case it has. I had a heck of a time digesting red meat when I started Paleo, but now I am doing great (so long as I don't drink water before, during, or right after the meal). Not diluting the stomach acid is a big thing, too. :)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 31, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Compound butter is even better! (Let butter soften to room temp, then mix in whatever herbs/spices you like...caramelized shallots are awesome, but things like basil and rosemary are great too.) Wrap in wax paper, roll up like a tube, twist both ends closed and store in the freezer. Cut off a 1/4 inch round or so to melt over a grilled steak. *Droooool.*

85382cd84288ed28c92cbfe7bfcaf226

(184)

on May 31, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Diane - absolutely. Cook it 'till it's fork tender at a simmer.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:06 PM

That breakfast suggestion sounds perfect. I've been looking for a way to pack more protein/fat into my mornings. Thank you!

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:01 PM

I've been looking for more reasons to use my slow cooker! Thank you!

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Sounds like a stir fry! I like that!

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:59 PM

Butter makes everything awesome.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Careful with the chuck roast. You really have to cook it low and slow for a long time. The first few times I tried to cook it I didn't do that and it was so tough and difficult to eat I would chew for a while and have to spit it out.

01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:30 PM

I've seen that picture a few times and I wish my patties did that.

01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:30 PM

I buy my ground beef from whole foods and directly from a farmer, and unfortunately both of them are very lean (90% I believe). Thus, I add a little coconut oil. But you're right, if the beef is not super lean, then I'm sure leaving out the oil is fine.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:14 PM

+1 for the bone. It reminds me that I have a veal shank in the freezer waiting for a slow cook in red wine and garlic.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:47 PM

I agree. As long as you aren't getting super lean ground beef (why would you do that?), you usually don't need to add the coconut oil. The tasty fat coming off the patties will do just fine: http://www.archevore.com/storage/grass%20fed%20burger%20in%20pan.jpg

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:18 PM

Thank you so much! I will definitely be trying this ASAP.

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9 Answers

2
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:05 PM

For inexpensive cuts, I second the advice for stews. I prefer beef shank for this and marinate the meat in wine overnight. Then find a recipe for beef bourguignon (Julia Child) and take your time. Stews are forgiving.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:14 PM

+1 for the bone. It reminds me that I have a veal shank in the freezer waiting for a slow cook in red wine and garlic.

2
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:56 PM

You might want to eat out the first few times to make sure you don't cook the meat poorly and reinforce your meat phobia.

You know what's good on steak? Butter.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:59 PM

Butter makes everything awesome.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 31, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Compound butter is even better! (Let butter soften to room temp, then mix in whatever herbs/spices you like...caramelized shallots are awesome, but things like basil and rosemary are great too.) Wrap in wax paper, roll up like a tube, twist both ends closed and store in the freezer. Cut off a 1/4 inch round or so to melt over a grilled steak. *Droooool.*

2
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on May 31, 2012
at 12:30 PM

Do you have a slow-cooker? I like slow-cooked chuck roast or brisket. Any sort of seasonings, and liquid (stock, water, wine, coffee, whatever) about halfway up the side. If you cook it all day you'll have really tender meat with tons of flavor. Serve with whatever veggies you like. My favorite right now is leftover coffee + cinnamon + cumin + coriander + chilies.

Also, stew meat is awesome. You can make chilies, European-flavored stews, or really anything cooked at a low temp for a few hours.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:01 PM

I've been looking for more reasons to use my slow cooker! Thank you!

2
01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:24 PM

If money is tight, ground beef is a great option. You can even get 100% grass-fed beef for relatively little money. My favorite things to do with it are

1) Fry it up with coconut oil and spices and then top with half an avocado and a fried egg for breakfast 2) Fry it up with coconut oil and then mix it into a salad with romaine, tomatoes, avocado, and whatever else you like in a salad 3) Eat it with sweet potatoes. YUMMM.

I require a big, proteiny breakfast to get me going but I ate too much pork and need a break from it, so ground beef does the trick.

01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:30 PM

I've seen that picture a few times and I wish my patties did that.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:47 PM

I agree. As long as you aren't getting super lean ground beef (why would you do that?), you usually don't need to add the coconut oil. The tasty fat coming off the patties will do just fine: http://www.archevore.com/storage/grass%20fed%20burger%20in%20pan.jpg

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:06 PM

That breakfast suggestion sounds perfect. I've been looking for a way to pack more protein/fat into my mornings. Thank you!

01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:30 PM

I buy my ground beef from whole foods and directly from a farmer, and unfortunately both of them are very lean (90% I believe). Thus, I add a little coconut oil. But you're right, if the beef is not super lean, then I'm sure leaving out the oil is fine.

2
85382cd84288ed28c92cbfe7bfcaf226

(184)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:09 PM

Chuck roast is good and relatively cheap. Easy way to do it:

  1. Cut it in 1-2 inch cubes.
  2. Coat it with some oil if your choice, plus dash some salt and pepper.
  3. Sear it on all sides. This'll take a few minutes. You want to get the outside to have a bit of a crust. (This step is not completely necessary, but it adds flavor).
  4. Add in some broth, stock, or other liquid, enough to go partway up the side of the beef (no need to cover it completely). Also add in whatever paleo-friendly seasonings you want.
  5. Simmer this for an hour or so, until the meat is fork-tender - it'll have a texture similar to pulled pork. If you want to add vegetables instead of cooking them separately, add them in about halfway through.
  6. Eat.

Conversely, if you own a slow cooker, the directions are easier. 1. Put chuck roast and vegetables in slow cooker. 2. Add liquid. 3. Turn to low and wait 8 hours.

Also, any leaner cuts (sirloin, tenderloin, NY Strip) can be handled much like one would cook a pork chop - I prefer them rare to medium depending on the cut. Melt some butter on it afterwards to add the healthy fats you want.

Hope this helps!

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Careful with the chuck roast. You really have to cook it low and slow for a long time. The first few times I tried to cook it I didn't do that and it was so tough and difficult to eat I would chew for a while and have to spit it out.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:18 PM

Thank you so much! I will definitely be trying this ASAP.

85382cd84288ed28c92cbfe7bfcaf226

(184)

on May 31, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Diane - absolutely. Cook it 'till it's fork tender at a simmer.

4929a87e3f7438f18a0afbdde291ed5e

(752)

on May 31, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Buy a pressure cooker and cook the chuck roast in there in chunks after you sear it in coconut oil (or ghee). A pressure cooker has been a life-saver for me in preparing large amounts of cheaper-cut meats (pork and beef). It also tends to break down the proteins a bit and make it easier to digest the beef - at least in my case it has. I had a heck of a time digesting red meat when I started Paleo, but now I am doing great (so long as I don't drink water before, during, or right after the meal). Not diluting the stomach acid is a big thing, too. :)

121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

(1327)

on May 31, 2012
at 06:43 PM

The pressure cooker. The most underrated and sadly underused cooking implement in culinary history.

1
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:22 PM

A good option, also, is to use meat as part of the dish and braise it with vegetables you enjoy. A chuck roast or steak works well for this, and it gives you a little more fat than some cuts. Cut the meat into chunks or buy it as stew meat. Brown it in a dry pan, add the veggies you enjoy--I like onions, garlic, carrots, mushrooms, green beans or broccoli, and let it simmer on low for an hour or two. You can add tomato if you like.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Sounds like a stir fry! I like that!

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:22 PM

Lamb and goat curries. The meat is just a part of the spicy texture.

0
Ec1dc4f8143b6bdaa0ff64fafa55d424

(246)

on May 31, 2012
at 03:01 PM

Not sure this is entirely on topic, but here is a cheap way to turn economy cuts into primo eating.. http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/04/cook-your-meat-in-a-beer-cooler-the-worlds-best-sous-vide-hack.html

we have tried this, (twice) once for steaks and once for 15 lbs of chuck roast; and it really works! freezer weight ziplocks will do the job, but the vacuum sealer really makes it easier to freeze portions afterward.

3 suggestions;
1 be sure to insulate the top of your cooler; reflectix, closed cell foam, heavy blanket, etc, as coolers are not built to keep heat in (cool sinks so the tops are not as insulated as the walls)

2 have a really good thermometer- we got by with a chef style 'instant' read, but the remote probe digital might work better when left in place, and

3 use the biggest cooler you can find; as the more water you have at temp, the fewer degrees you will lose per hour. (thermal reservoir)

hope this helps, Betsy

0
C326acd0ae246a39c5685f2ba72e3136

on May 31, 2012
at 02:02 PM

lololol at the tags.. I would answer but looks like a few people already got to it! Good luck.

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