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Study: "Flaxseed dietary fibers lower cholesterol...." Hack the results.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 04, 2012 at 4:33 PM

I was glad to see this study come out a couple of days ago: Flaxseed dietary fibers lower cholesterol and increase fecal fat excretion, but magnitude of effect depend on food type

I'm wondering a couple of things, though:

Would baking vs. raw make a difference in the effects of the flax fiber?

Or is it possible that a true flax bread (instead of the "rye with fiber added" that they used here) would give similar results to the "liquid with flax fiber thrown in"?

Or would results be totally different if they had used ground flax meal instead of just flax fiber?

Whaddaya think?

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 05, 2012
at 04:15 PM

Awesome downvotes. Unfunny.

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Nah, I buy the fiber argument. (And see comment on Heather's answer re: taste!)

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:50 PM

See my comment on raydawg's post re: the cholesterol. Know all about the rancidity issues--even blogged about it! :) I grind my flax in my blender; turns out great. Sounds like you were eating your flax raw, and your hubby cooks his? There are sometimes cyanide issues with raw flax, which might explain the difference in your reactions. (Heat neutralizes the cyanide, just like in roasted cashews.)

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:45 PM

:D Actually, to me flax has a bland, nearly neutral taste. And that can be a good medium for other flavors, which is why I like it for breads. (Once in a while, a good ham-and-cheese melt is just what I need, and lettuce wraps just don't deal well with grilling!)

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:41 PM

Some of us are in a "balance out the inner workings phase. Granted, sometimes lowering cholesterol is stupid, but sometimes it's what you need. And for those of us working on weight loss, sometimes flushing fat is a good thing.

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:37 PM

Heh. After reading the answers so far, I believe we've hit one of those situations I note in my profile: "places that low carb and paleo... don't [overlap] (and shouldn't!)" After seeing the flax recipes on Chowstalker, and the comments on Mark's Daily Apple from folks who say they use flax despite what Mark says, I assumed there would be more interest. Ah, well; live and learn!

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on February 05, 2012
at 12:01 AM

But hey, if you think it tastes amazing :).

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4 Answers

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on February 04, 2012
at 08:28 PM

Why would you want to lower cholesterol, which our bodies use for repairs? And other than n6 PUFAs, why would you want to eat or absorb less fat?

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:41 PM

Some of us are in a "balance out the inner workings phase. Granted, sometimes lowering cholesterol is stupid, but sometimes it's what you need. And for those of us working on weight loss, sometimes flushing fat is a good thing.

1
C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

on February 04, 2012
at 11:59 PM

This link has been posted in the past: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/quick-guide-edible-seeds/#axzz1lSa2Qz9w And, ya, at this point I see no reason to waste my time/calories on it or chia.

It strikes me as inefficient. I'd prefer my food to be adding considerably to my nutrient intake, not inhibiting it. If it's not doing that, it should be a totally delicious. While choosing my limited calories each day I find neither here.

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on February 05, 2012
at 12:01 AM

But hey, if you think it tastes amazing :).

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:45 PM

:D Actually, to me flax has a bland, nearly neutral taste. And that can be a good medium for other flavors, which is why I like it for breads. (Once in a while, a good ham-and-cheese melt is just what I need, and lettuce wraps just don't deal well with grilling!)

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:50 AM

Simple. Flax makes you lower your food reward by tasting like butt.

You eat less, you get lower cholesterol.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 05, 2012
at 04:15 PM

Awesome downvotes. Unfunny.

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Nah, I buy the fiber argument. (And see comment on Heather's answer re: taste!)

0
27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on February 04, 2012
at 11:25 PM

I'm also unclear as to why you'd want to lower cholesterol. Since flaxseed is so high in fiber, it would likely lower cholesterol. I wouldn't use preground because it's prone to rancidity due to high omega-6 content. So if you do decide to use the seeds -- buy a cheap coffee bean grinder and grind your seeds fresh each use. I used to do this when I ate flaxseed daily. Then I would add a bit of water to the fresh ground seeds -- this makes a gelatinous porridge consistency -- then add stevia, cinammon, berries, etc. This was delicious to me and also definitely promoted regularity.

After doing this for months, I noticed a little red bumps cropping up on my legs and arms and thought it was the common karatosis pilaris. I had a helpful phone consult with Ray Peat for thyroid issues and mentioned this issue and the flaxseed. He said that the high omega-6 was causing inflammation and the highly unsaturated fat was no good for my thyroid. I was dubious and didn't like the idea of giving up my flaxseed porridge but gave it a try and all the bumps disappeared within weekds never to re-appear again. I am definitely not against flaxseed -- it just wasn't for me. My hubby eats tons of those little flaxseed crackers and has no skin issues whatsoever. So ymmv.

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on February 05, 2012
at 01:50 PM

See my comment on raydawg's post re: the cholesterol. Know all about the rancidity issues--even blogged about it! :) I grind my flax in my blender; turns out great. Sounds like you were eating your flax raw, and your hubby cooks his? There are sometimes cyanide issues with raw flax, which might explain the difference in your reactions. (Heat neutralizes the cyanide, just like in roasted cashews.)

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