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Some random questions i had..

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 16, 2012 at 9:57 PM

Q1. Is it possible that body may switch energy sources in the day (fat or carbs)? Or is it like if you're in one mode you're in that mode for some fixed time atleast?

Q2. I am trying paleo but i think i'm ending up with a low carb diet. Are these diets an all or nothing kinda situation, meaning could you result in a condition where you arent really using fat for energy and having more fat in your diet?

Q3. As endurance athletes have a lot of carbs for energy, which result in insulin spikes, so do endurance athelete's have more chances of getting diabetes?

Q4. If we workout without eating (semi starving or starving state) is it a sure shot way of using fat for energy?

Thanks guys.

73acc7f54e8be7a8d067be2b3c00ce2e

(25)

on February 26, 2012
at 05:36 AM

Athletes (or anyone) getting T2D when not exercising and having lot of carbs is understandable. T2D is caused by pancreas getting tired of producing insulin (for what i have read). Even when you try to keep your glycogen stores topped off you need insulin to let glucose enter muscle cells (and become glycogen). So in that sense endurance athletes do put pressure on their pancreas. Wouldn't that be reason enough to predispose one to T2D?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:29 AM

How much you actually need is a pretty controversial topic, but I think it is because how glycogen is manufactured and utilized varies from person to person. Many people recommend starting with 75-100 grams of carbohydrate per day, and adjust up or down depending on your performance during workouts. You could get your triglycerides tested to see if you've been overshooting it for an extended time period.

73acc7f54e8be7a8d067be2b3c00ce2e

(25)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:03 AM

Is there anyway to find out when you're 'topped off' so you can stop?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 16, 2012
at 10:02 PM

That's a lotta questions all wrapped up in one. I'd at least separate out the garlic one if you want to maximize your chance of having it answered to your satisfaction.

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3 Answers

1
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on February 16, 2012
at 10:32 PM

1: most people are in ketosis when they sleep, for example, so you do switch between carbs and fat as your primary fuel if you are eating carbs. A regular metabolism will utilize carbs for energy as long as BG is elevated, then switch to FFAs once BG lowers.

2: moving your diet toward being primarily based on fat will cause your system to adapt to primarily fat burning. So long as you feel that you have proper energy after, say, 3 weeks, you will not be in the state you propose in your question.

3: It looks like not, but I'm not an endurance athlete. Maybe this MDA post will have your answer: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/diabetes/

4: Yes. Leangains is based in part on this premise, and claims that it will also help you build lean muscle mass.

5: To paraphrase Bob Ross, use odorless garlic, or you'll be workin' by yourself.

0
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on February 16, 2012
at 11:52 PM

I'm only gonna attempt the first one.

Q1. Is it possible that body may switch energy sources in the day (fat or carbs)? Or is it like if you're in one mode you're in that mode for some fixed time atleast?

A1. You never really switch between fuel sources. You are always burning fat and glucose - whether you just ate high carb, low carb, are fasted, sleeping or working out. The ration of fat to glucose being oxidized can change - but it's not as nuch as most people think. So I think it is incorrect to think that there is a "fat burning mode" or a "sugar burning mode", although the ratio of glucose burned will increase after a high carb meal (and is generally higher in the obese). Ketosis may be a special case, but ketones are being produced even after a high carb meal - just in very small quantities. if a lot of ketones are produced the amount of glucose being oxidized decreases more significantly.

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 16, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Q1: Unless you develop hypoglycemia and have to get up to eat in the middle of the night, you are burning fat between dinner and breakfast.

Q2: Most people mix it up. Sometimes you'll have enough carbs to stay out of ketosis, other times you'll be in it. Example: sweet potato with butter will probably keep you out of it.

Q3: As I understand it, endurance athletes are trying to keep their glyogen stores topped off in their livers, it is when you are already topped off and dump a bunch of fructose on top of that you'll end up with IR and T2D issues. A number of athletes do develop T2D when they get older though, and aren't exercising anymore, but have trained themselves to carb load out of habit.

Q4: By default, I would guess yes, I don't know what else would be available to your body as a fuel source at that moment.

Q5: No idea, but I'm wary of megadoses of anything. Garlic can thin your blood, whether this is a plus or a negative I will leave up to you.

73acc7f54e8be7a8d067be2b3c00ce2e

(25)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:03 AM

Is there anyway to find out when you're 'topped off' so you can stop?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:29 AM

How much you actually need is a pretty controversial topic, but I think it is because how glycogen is manufactured and utilized varies from person to person. Many people recommend starting with 75-100 grams of carbohydrate per day, and adjust up or down depending on your performance during workouts. You could get your triglycerides tested to see if you've been overshooting it for an extended time period.

73acc7f54e8be7a8d067be2b3c00ce2e

(25)

on February 26, 2012
at 05:36 AM

Athletes (or anyone) getting T2D when not exercising and having lot of carbs is understandable. T2D is caused by pancreas getting tired of producing insulin (for what i have read). Even when you try to keep your glycogen stores topped off you need insulin to let glucose enter muscle cells (and become glycogen). So in that sense endurance athletes do put pressure on their pancreas. Wouldn't that be reason enough to predispose one to T2D?

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