5

votes

Seasonality of Weight Loss

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 27, 2011 at 2:46 PM

I've been pretty strongly dairy-paleo (more along the lines of Mark Sisson than Cordain or Wolf) for a little over a year now, and the progress has been amazing. I dropped from 240 down to a low of 180 in June, where I stayed pretty even until November. Since then, I've had 3 cheat days with grain and sugar, and 1 with just sugar (Thanksgiving, Christmas, and my anniversary, with a binge day I'm not too proud of last weekend). Since Thanksgiving, my weight has shot up to the 185-190 range, with no real signs of letting up. I was wondering, for those of you who have been paleo for a lot longer: Is your weight seemingly governed by the time of year? Several animals put on fat for insulation and energy reserves during the colder months, but I don't know if primates are one of them.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 28, 2011
at 06:24 PM

If by "predisposition" you mean "genetic/metabolic/behavioral" urge to fatten in fall, then I would disagree that one exists. If by "predisposition" you mean "our bodies have the metabolic machinery to fatten when presented with foods that appear in fall in certain parts of the world", then I'd agree completely. The first position assumes some trait in humans _drives_ us to fatten seasonally, the other assumes that the human bodies can fatten in certain conditions, which in some climes obtain before a season changes.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 28, 2011
at 01:08 PM

Exactly! One of us is arguing "Since I don't get fat in the fall/winter, no humans have a predisposition to gain fat for winter," while the other one thinks it's more complicated than that. If all it took to understand human evolution was to ask you for your personal anecdotes and observations, we'd all be disease free! :)

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 28, 2011
at 12:03 PM

Indeed, A<->B relationships are rare, and probably don't apply in this case. And that too would seem to be evidence against the idea proposed in this question.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 28, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Fruits change seasonally; in theory, the vitamin C in fruits is protective against the fattening effects of fructose, as moderated by uric acid. It is only when the fruit ripens that the C content decreases and the fructose content increases. Tropical HGs are probably not eating the high fructose/low C fruit year round. I think it's presumptuous to assume that the body composition of tropical HGs doesn't change seasonally, and to assume that there aren't other factors that might interact (e.g., sunlight and vitamin D), making any "explanation" more complicated than a simple A<->B relationship.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 28, 2011
at 12:13 AM

Obviously increased fat stores would bring increased survival during a famine. I don't think anyone would dispute that. The thread/question is asking if we store fat in summer/fall in the context of this food replete environment: would you then agree that lacking the environmental triggers for any sort of fruit gorging/fat gaining behavior, this behavior is not present? Also, how do you explain tropical HGs with year round fruit access not getting fat?

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 11:19 PM

For most people, every season is "ripe fruit" season. When the SAD includes high quantities of fructose year-round, you remove the seasonal patterns that you might see if people only have access to food that's in season. Very little is "hard-wired," because most phenotypic expressions are affected by the environment. In other words, there is a theoretically strong rationale for believing that increased fat stores are associated with increased survival during times of famine, and that our modern environment masks this association masks this association because fructose is always plentiful.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 11:09 PM

With respect to arms, your analogy is flawed; none (or at least nearly all) of the people I cite as my examples have had any sort of "accident" which removes their instincts. If we have an instinctive drive to fatten prior to winter, then how is it that I and many others don't? If, as you analogize, this instinct has been removed through some sort of environmental change, then we no longer have it and our positions are actually in agreement.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 11:08 PM

With respect to arms, your analogy is flawed; none (or at least nearly all) of the people I cite as my examples have had any sort of "accident" which removes their instincts. If we have an instinctive drive to fatten prior to winter, then how is it that I and many others don't?

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 11:06 PM

Obesity in general is an entirely different issue than seasonal weight gain, so if we're talking strawmen I'll raise you a red herring. I'm curious as to what you think this thread is about if not some sort of instinctive (ie "hardwired") drive to gain fat in the summer/fall; everything I've said should be taken in that context, and if you're arguing outside of it then I'm not clear on your position.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 10:08 PM

"Hardwired" makes yours a strawman argument, as if all human traits are immutable. It's as silly as saying humans are "hardwired" to have arms. I lost my arms in an accident. Well, that leads to a contradiction too, if you want to ignore the fact that our environment can change the way we behave. Isn't that the major premise of the "paleo" approach - that there's a mismatch between our current environment and our ancestral environment that's making us unhealthy? Millions, if not billions of people are overweight, in part because sugar, which we seem naturally drawn to, is now overly abundant.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 09:55 PM

Simple syllogism: I am human. I do not feel any urge, nor show any sign, of fattening in the winter. Most people under the age of 30 do not either. If it is true that humans are hardwired to fatten for the winter, it is true that I (and those under 30) are human, we have a contradiction. The fact that we have access to fruit year round strikes me as an important point indeed; if we are hardwired to eat it, and we accept that Paleo dieting helps get people's metabolisms back to their healthy state, why don't all Paleo types gorge on fruit in the fall?

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 09:45 PM

"Notice how other animals which fatten for the winter tend to do so to a significant degree - humans do not." Maybe because most humans are already too fat, and an extra 5 lbs is not obvious to you. Plus, I don't think it's relevant to this discussion to compare wild animals to modern humans. You have access to fruit year round. Because you don't crave fruit in September means absolutely nothing.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 09:31 PM

Again, I do not disagree with the idea that fructose is especially fattening, and I'm willing to grant that the paper could be correct in their speculation. But the idea that after several million years of meaty evolution we retain some deep rooted desire to eat fruit to fatten up for the winter strikes me as observably false.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 09:26 PM

I agree that fructose is especially fattening, but I find the story about fruit, winter fattening to be one of those "just-so" devices regularly used to justify evolutionary speculation, yet lacking in important detail. Notice how other animals which fatten for the winter tend to do so to a significant degree - humans do not. A couple extra pounds aren't going to help much, you need to add significant weight. And how is it that HG societies with widespread year-round access to fruit do not get massively obese? Why don't I get an urge to eat fruit in September?

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 09:01 PM

Not to mention the fact that the loss of ability to synthesize vitamin C involved all primates (generally herbivores) except prosimians.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 08:52 PM

Our ancestors probably did not become more carnivorous during times of extreme cold-induced famine, which is the survival threat that the authors believe to have facilitated the knockout of the vitamin C gene. I don't know if anyone is wondering whether fat is advantageous in the winter purely for its insulating effects. I think it makes the most sense to think that in periods of uncertain food availability, the person who can store extra fat calories by eating ripe fruit in late summer is more likely to survive a winter famine than someone who does not add extra fat prior to winter.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 27, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Well, human bodies can route the blood flow above or below the subcutaneous fat depending upon temperature, but I do agree that I've never come across proof of a seasonally-induced hormonal change toward a greater amount of adiposity.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 06:47 PM

That would establish that we get fat eating fructose. It wouldn't suggest that we have a metabolic urge to fatten in the summer and fall, as do seasonally fattening species. Also, the paper seems to be ignoring alternative possibilities for the knockout effect; eating a carnivorous diet appears to obviate the need for vitamin C in humans, so what if the reason we lost that ability is that our ancestors were highly carnivorous? Fructose fattening would just be a side effect, and not significant to seasonal fattening.

A993550f2a130df8d3462c08582f08ec

(589)

on January 27, 2011
at 06:00 PM

It could possibly be the sunlight issue, though I supplement with 5000 IU of cholecalciferol daily. Glad to hear that it's not just me, though. Thanks!

A993550f2a130df8d3462c08582f08ec

(589)

on January 27, 2011
at 05:58 PM

I was once 285 pounds, and I can tell you with certainty that I feel the cold much more than I did back then. I would wear shorts and t-shirts when it was in the mid-40s back then, but now I want a jacket if it's lower than 60 or so.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on January 27, 2011
at 05:26 PM

I can attest that since I've gained weight, I am also more prone to be warm when I used to be cold all the time. Anecdotally, I've also noticed my larger friends tend to wear less clothing in the winter and complain about being too warm in rooms I considered cool. Do you have some studies, pfw, which back up these claims? I'm not convinced the "majority" of human evolution took place in Africa, either. Evolution is an ongoing process, and my ancestors resided in cold climates for a very, very long time. As another example, I think it's pretty safe to say that the Inuits have adapted traits.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 27, 2011
at 04:43 PM

Winter is a time of scarcer food resources in many areas. Could be a natural metabolic urge to have extra foods stores in the form of fat.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 27, 2011
at 04:41 PM

LMAO! Even hair? I guess I never thought of that also changing.

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7 Answers

3
4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 04:19 PM

Humans do not put on fat for the winter. Human fat is generally a poor insulator thanks to the way our bodies work, and our adaptation to winter climates is clothing and eating animals, not blubber layers and hibernation. The idea of some sort of programmed fat accumulation during the winter is a tempting speculation, but there is no physiological or evolutionary evidence to suggest that it is true in humans. Keep in mind that the majority of human evolution took place in Africa and "winter" there isn't the same as it is in the northern US.

There are a massive variety of reasons for why you might gain weight if you live in a cold climate, but I really doubt metabolic programming is one of them.


edit: lol, downvotes.

Since there's not enough room to address stuff in the comments:

@Eva: "Could be" is not "is". Science: propose hypothesis, test predictions, attempt to falsify. Hypothesis;Prediction: humans are seasonally fattening animals; we gain weight to prepare for winter. I don't gain weight in the winter - my weight is stable year round unless I consciously intervene. Uh oh. Either I'm not human or the hypothesis is wrong. (Note: I'm of Dutch and Irish descent, so I've got plenty of local winter evolution in my blood, and I live in NJ, having just received a foot plus of snow)

We clearly are not hibernators, and our evolutionary experience in cold climates took place in the context of clothing and fire. Seasonal fat gain in many animals could easily be an artifact of seasonal food availability rather than metabolic command, and such a thing could easily explain human fat gain in the winter; we have a string of food oriented holidays just when we stop doing anything physical.

Oh, and one more nail: if you're going to gain weight to prepare for the winter, you do it in the summer and early fall like every other animal. Not in November and December, well past the point of seasonal food abundance.

@fat insulation: Human fat is generally a poor insulator. This is a physiologically true statement. Your skin is full of blood vessels and your fat is not; toss a fat guy out in the arctic naked and he'll die slightly slower than a skinny guy and get frostbite at the same rate, whereas the seal watching in confusion will be perfectly fine. Our fat plays a role in regulating temperature but it is not its primary purpose, and it certainly doesn't have broad survival and evolutionary implications for a species that invented clothing and fire before moving into cold climates.

Random anecdotes about fat people and their clothing doesn't change the physiology of fat, and indeed easily suggest alternative explanations. When I weighed 160lbs, I was cold all the time. When I weighed 160lbs and started eating more food, I was warm all the time. Being fat is associated with eating more food; maybe fat people gaining weight are more dietary-thermogenic than skinny people losing weight. Just one possibility that isn't "fat people are better insulated".

Further edit: I should note that I do not mean to claim that fat has ZERO thermal effect; it clearly does and we clearly make use of it for that purpose. I dispute that this effect is particularly useful in adapting to a cold winter climate when compared to the effect of clothing and artificial heat, and I dispute that humans have some programmed desire to add fat to be warmer when it gets cold.

@inuit: A perfect test! If cold should cause humans to adapt by adding fat in the winter, we should definitely see this phenomenon in the Inuit, who suffer the worst winters out of any human population. Except there's no evidence this is true, and some evidence1 that it is false:

There is some increase of skinfold thickness in the winter months, but this is not associated with any marked weight gain or loss of muscle strength. Possibly, the hydration of subcutaneous tissue is increased by frequent exposure to intense cold.

If humans are a seasonally fattening species with metabolic urges to gain weight in the fall, how could it possibly be that the human population suffering the worst winters out of everyone has no fat gain adaptation?

Downvote away!

A993550f2a130df8d3462c08582f08ec

(589)

on January 27, 2011
at 05:58 PM

I was once 285 pounds, and I can tell you with certainty that I feel the cold much more than I did back then. I would wear shorts and t-shirts when it was in the mid-40s back then, but now I want a jacket if it's lower than 60 or so.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 27, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Well, human bodies can route the blood flow above or below the subcutaneous fat depending upon temperature, but I do agree that I've never come across proof of a seasonally-induced hormonal change toward a greater amount of adiposity.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 27, 2011
at 04:43 PM

Winter is a time of scarcer food resources in many areas. Could be a natural metabolic urge to have extra foods stores in the form of fat.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on January 27, 2011
at 05:26 PM

I can attest that since I've gained weight, I am also more prone to be warm when I used to be cold all the time. Anecdotally, I've also noticed my larger friends tend to wear less clothing in the winter and complain about being too warm in rooms I considered cool. Do you have some studies, pfw, which back up these claims? I'm not convinced the "majority" of human evolution took place in Africa, either. Evolution is an ongoing process, and my ancestors resided in cold climates for a very, very long time. As another example, I think it's pretty safe to say that the Inuits have adapted traits.

3
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on January 27, 2011
at 03:31 PM

I know that my weight loss stalled significantly and I went up a few pounds this winter, where I've stayed for a month or two. Ugh! Though I stayed gluten free and ate some chocolate and rice crackers (with dips) over the holidays, I think a huge part of it is not being able to do as much outside as I was last summer when I was dropping the weight.

Very much looking forward to warmer temps when I can get out more for casual low level activity.

2
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on January 27, 2011
at 03:55 PM

Could it be lack of sunlight, could it be a response to the shorter days?

Honestly, I have a hard time thinking we are not programmed to eat and retain more calories in the wintertime.

I live in a warm climate year-round, yet the lack of sunlight in the winter months leaves me groggy and hungry more often than when the days get longer and brighter. Maybe it's a response to lower vitamin D, maybe it's just a evolutionary trigger to store up for winter, or maybe (considering you were heavy at one time) eating is your method to cope with seasonal affective disorder and you are inadvertantly eating more than you normally would. I attribute a little "all of the above" to my own personal weight gain in the winter months. I've shot up 15lbs this winter and expect it to be gone by late February.

Either way, easy off, easy on. Don't sweat it too much. Once spring/summer is back, provided you've fixed your dietary indiscretions, 8-10lbs of weight will make it's way off your body.

A993550f2a130df8d3462c08582f08ec

(589)

on January 27, 2011
at 06:00 PM

It could possibly be the sunlight issue, though I supplement with 5000 IU of cholecalciferol daily. Glad to hear that it's not just me, though. Thanks!

1
7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 28, 2011
at 03:42 AM

Me: I've lost close on 100 lbs since 12/2008, about 45 lbs since going paleo in March 2010. I live in Minnesota, so if there is a place for functional body fat, this is it. I've continued to lose fat mass all winter and I'm contining to shoot for a few pounds more. Grok kills the mamoth, eats the meat, then wears the skin...he doesn't need fat mass to insulate his body.

1
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on January 27, 2011
at 08:03 PM

I have not ever seen my weight change due to the seasons. My weight changes based on what I'm eating and how I am moving my body. I can always correlate the gains and losses back to one of these two things.

1
461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 05:34 PM

pfw, tell me if this changes your mind: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2917125/

The theory being that, through evolution, humans lost the ability to synthesize vitamin C as a way of enhancing the fat-storing properties of fructose. As winter nears, the fructose content of fruits increase and the vitamin C content decreases. If this theory is correct, it would suggest that people without the ability to synthesize vitamin C (and gain fat by eating fruit) were selected for because they were more likely to survive winters than those who could not synthesize vitamin C (and did not gain fat by eating fruit).

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 09:26 PM

I agree that fructose is especially fattening, but I find the story about fruit, winter fattening to be one of those "just-so" devices regularly used to justify evolutionary speculation, yet lacking in important detail. Notice how other animals which fatten for the winter tend to do so to a significant degree - humans do not. A couple extra pounds aren't going to help much, you need to add significant weight. And how is it that HG societies with widespread year-round access to fruit do not get massively obese? Why don't I get an urge to eat fruit in September?

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 08:52 PM

Our ancestors probably did not become more carnivorous during times of extreme cold-induced famine, which is the survival threat that the authors believe to have facilitated the knockout of the vitamin C gene. I don't know if anyone is wondering whether fat is advantageous in the winter purely for its insulating effects. I think it makes the most sense to think that in periods of uncertain food availability, the person who can store extra fat calories by eating ripe fruit in late summer is more likely to survive a winter famine than someone who does not add extra fat prior to winter.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 11:06 PM

Obesity in general is an entirely different issue than seasonal weight gain, so if we're talking strawmen I'll raise you a red herring. I'm curious as to what you think this thread is about if not some sort of instinctive (ie "hardwired") drive to gain fat in the summer/fall; everything I've said should be taken in that context, and if you're arguing outside of it then I'm not clear on your position.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 09:55 PM

Simple syllogism: I am human. I do not feel any urge, nor show any sign, of fattening in the winter. Most people under the age of 30 do not either. If it is true that humans are hardwired to fatten for the winter, it is true that I (and those under 30) are human, we have a contradiction. The fact that we have access to fruit year round strikes me as an important point indeed; if we are hardwired to eat it, and we accept that Paleo dieting helps get people's metabolisms back to their healthy state, why don't all Paleo types gorge on fruit in the fall?

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 09:31 PM

Again, I do not disagree with the idea that fructose is especially fattening, and I'm willing to grant that the paper could be correct in their speculation. But the idea that after several million years of meaty evolution we retain some deep rooted desire to eat fruit to fatten up for the winter strikes me as observably false.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 28, 2011
at 12:03 PM

Indeed, A<->B relationships are rare, and probably don't apply in this case. And that too would seem to be evidence against the idea proposed in this question.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 06:47 PM

That would establish that we get fat eating fructose. It wouldn't suggest that we have a metabolic urge to fatten in the summer and fall, as do seasonally fattening species. Also, the paper seems to be ignoring alternative possibilities for the knockout effect; eating a carnivorous diet appears to obviate the need for vitamin C in humans, so what if the reason we lost that ability is that our ancestors were highly carnivorous? Fructose fattening would just be a side effect, and not significant to seasonal fattening.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 09:01 PM

Not to mention the fact that the loss of ability to synthesize vitamin C involved all primates (generally herbivores) except prosimians.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 11:08 PM

With respect to arms, your analogy is flawed; none (or at least nearly all) of the people I cite as my examples have had any sort of "accident" which removes their instincts. If we have an instinctive drive to fatten prior to winter, then how is it that I and many others don't?

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 28, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Fruits change seasonally; in theory, the vitamin C in fruits is protective against the fattening effects of fructose, as moderated by uric acid. It is only when the fruit ripens that the C content decreases and the fructose content increases. Tropical HGs are probably not eating the high fructose/low C fruit year round. I think it's presumptuous to assume that the body composition of tropical HGs doesn't change seasonally, and to assume that there aren't other factors that might interact (e.g., sunlight and vitamin D), making any "explanation" more complicated than a simple A<->B relationship.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 27, 2011
at 11:09 PM

With respect to arms, your analogy is flawed; none (or at least nearly all) of the people I cite as my examples have had any sort of "accident" which removes their instincts. If we have an instinctive drive to fatten prior to winter, then how is it that I and many others don't? If, as you analogize, this instinct has been removed through some sort of environmental change, then we no longer have it and our positions are actually in agreement.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 28, 2011
at 06:24 PM

If by "predisposition" you mean "genetic/metabolic/behavioral" urge to fatten in fall, then I would disagree that one exists. If by "predisposition" you mean "our bodies have the metabolic machinery to fatten when presented with foods that appear in fall in certain parts of the world", then I'd agree completely. The first position assumes some trait in humans _drives_ us to fatten seasonally, the other assumes that the human bodies can fatten in certain conditions, which in some climes obtain before a season changes.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 28, 2011
at 01:08 PM

Exactly! One of us is arguing "Since I don't get fat in the fall/winter, no humans have a predisposition to gain fat for winter," while the other one thinks it's more complicated than that. If all it took to understand human evolution was to ask you for your personal anecdotes and observations, we'd all be disease free! :)

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 09:45 PM

"Notice how other animals which fatten for the winter tend to do so to a significant degree - humans do not." Maybe because most humans are already too fat, and an extra 5 lbs is not obvious to you. Plus, I don't think it's relevant to this discussion to compare wild animals to modern humans. You have access to fruit year round. Because you don't crave fruit in September means absolutely nothing.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 11:19 PM

For most people, every season is "ripe fruit" season. When the SAD includes high quantities of fructose year-round, you remove the seasonal patterns that you might see if people only have access to food that's in season. Very little is "hard-wired," because most phenotypic expressions are affected by the environment. In other words, there is a theoretically strong rationale for believing that increased fat stores are associated with increased survival during times of famine, and that our modern environment masks this association masks this association because fructose is always plentiful.

461281c9092d3cb306b46831064e2fc4

on January 27, 2011
at 10:08 PM

"Hardwired" makes yours a strawman argument, as if all human traits are immutable. It's as silly as saying humans are "hardwired" to have arms. I lost my arms in an accident. Well, that leads to a contradiction too, if you want to ignore the fact that our environment can change the way we behave. Isn't that the major premise of the "paleo" approach - that there's a mismatch between our current environment and our ancestral environment that's making us unhealthy? Millions, if not billions of people are overweight, in part because sugar, which we seem naturally drawn to, is now overly abundant.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 28, 2011
at 12:13 AM

Obviously increased fat stores would bring increased survival during a famine. I don't think anyone would dispute that. The thread/question is asking if we store fat in summer/fall in the context of this food replete environment: would you then agree that lacking the environmental triggers for any sort of fruit gorging/fat gaining behavior, this behavior is not present? Also, how do you explain tropical HGs with year round fruit access not getting fat?

1
239c765fa12bf9fa6b7a7bc0686e019d

on January 27, 2011
at 03:11 PM

I noticed that i put on a little bit of weight, in the winter, when i got more hairier. My winter 'coat' was lost during spring and summer along with a few kgs.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 27, 2011
at 04:41 PM

LMAO! Even hair? I guess I never thought of that also changing.

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