8

votes

No Dairy? How do you get enough Saturated Fat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 08, 2010 at 4:34 PM

I'm taking a cue from the Dr. Kurt Harris' PaNu plan and experimenting with using heavy cream and butter to increase my fat intake. To a lesser extent, I'm also including some Greek yogurt and cheese. Dr. Harris' own diet consists of 70% fat.

I've gotta say, so far I'm feeling good, but I'm noticing the biggest difference in feeling more energy when it comes to workouts. It's hard to tell after such a short time, but I feel like I'm leaning out a bit and putting on muscle even easier.

I wasn't having any problems prior to starting this experiment. But I'm curious, if I want to keep my fat intake high but exclude or minimize dairy...what's the best course of action? I'm OK with eating neolithic foods if they help keep my body in a good metabolic, anti-inflamed state.

Dr. Harris makes a good argument for dairy being better than coconut oil.

Also, are we sure "Grok" didn't consume dairy sometimes? Of course, he didn't milk wild elk. But, what if the elk had a spear through it's neck? Did Grok just throw out the milk of his kill?

Seems like he would have consumed it, providing dairy in his diet seasonally. I could be dead wrong, but the "milking a wild animal" argument is silly, since you can get milk from a dead animal, too -- this requires much less consent...

D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on May 06, 2012
at 01:50 AM

Stay away from soy, stop avoiding saturated fat. Canola oil is far down the list of acceptable in typical Paleo menus. Consider butter or coconut oil. Read "The Paleo Solution", "Ignore the Awkward", or "Good Calories, Bad Calories" for why saturated fat has been unfairly demonized.

A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on May 05, 2012
at 06:31 PM

Ha! Love it. What "quality" of lard should I be looking for? Organic, pasture raised, etc?

A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on May 05, 2012
at 06:29 PM

Kamal, I am intrigued by this chart. Would you be willing to post it on your website?

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:08 AM

"I've also been trying to stay away from Saturated fat, I do drink about 1 carton of soy milk a day...", "I'm about to go and make some stove top popcorn, (3 tbs oil, 1/2 cup kernals), and wonder if the canola oil/ olive oil is an acceptable substitute?" I'd recommend some more research into what a Paleo diet is all about. Once you're comfortable with the ideas behind it you'll not want to consume soy, corn and canola. There's loads of help and advice here on PH for the asking.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:00 AM

What different types of dairy products are you consuming, and what is the milk type?

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 05, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Why are you afraid of eating fat? Saturated fat, in moderation, is very good for you, and entirely necessary for good health.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on November 12, 2010
at 11:19 PM

It was pointed out to me that there is butter and then there is sweet cream butter. I thought there was no such thing. (only salted and unsalted) So, I looked and some package ingredients say made with sweet cream but there is also butter stating: cream So, my question is (splitting hairs) is butter (ingredient: cream) more processed than butter (made with sweet cream) because they removed something...just wondering...:)

Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 11, 2010
at 03:37 AM

Also, Rule #2... Harris clearly endorses coconut fats.

Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 11, 2010
at 03:35 AM

Harris argues, throughout his blog, that we needn't discard foods that are neolithic just for that fact alone, but that we ought to consider giving up neolithic foods if they have a high probability of being related to modern diseases. He does not endorse dairy in every sense, in fact, he recommends ditching dairy UNLESS you have trouble meeting calorie needs without all the carbs. A fully compliant "PaleoNu" diet is dairy-free. See rule #12 at http://www.paleonu.com/get-started/

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 10, 2010
at 05:33 PM

I would assume something similar to 200mg omega 3 per tbs and 400mg omega 6 for good grassfed stuff.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 10, 2010
at 04:26 PM

.. and eat half a bag at one sitting. ;-) I just can't have them at home, too good!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 10, 2010
at 04:15 AM

Hey Stabby...I don't suppose you know the omega 3 and 6 content of grassfed beef tallow? I have this handy little spreadsheet with most of my foods' omega ratios in it, and I'd love to stick tallow in there. I assume it's similar to grassfed beef's ratio, but who knows?

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 09, 2010
at 05:06 AM

If butter is bad for you, then they shouldn't have made it taste so good! ;-)

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 09, 2010
at 04:48 AM

Reverse disclaimer: I love butter and rarely eat coconut oil. In fact, I'm going to go dip my finger in the ghee jar right now.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on September 09, 2010
at 04:37 AM

Wagon Creek Creamery raises grassfed dairy cows. Here's their product page, which lists Greek Yogurt: http://wagoncreekcreamery.com/products.html Their online ordering page isn't working, but you might be able to contact them...here's the contact info: http://wagoncreekcreamery.com/dairy.html

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:54 AM

And as for the prehistory facts, are you sure about our having eaten coconuts for that long? I honestly wouldn't bet any significant sum of money on it either way, but there is this from a little bit down on that same thread from Dr. H's forum: "Do you recall seeing many coconut palms in central africa or or northern europe? I don't."

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:52 AM

Jay, if you look more closely at what he says, that's not quite right. He might be speaking a little loosely, but I can assure you that even if he brings up our prehistory the metabolic facts come first. Thus: "We don't really know that much about any unique consequences of eating the MCTs in coconut and their first pass metabolism through the liver." And: "Coconut has zero n-3 fatty acids. Coconut has no vitamin K2 or CLA or carnitite or B12."

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:45 AM

Hey Krish, this stuff is not Greek, but I think it's 50% calories from fat: http://www.tpforganics.com/ Traders Point Creamery whole milk yogurt. Surprisingly widely available for a grass-fed product. Midwest and east coast mostly; you can see the locations on their site. And oh yeah it's probably the best yogurt I've ever tasted.

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on September 08, 2010
at 11:10 PM

@ David, I think you've misread Dr. Harris' argument. He argues that dairy fat is superior to coconut because humans have a long history of eating animal fat and not a long history of eating coconut. So, he is (i) making the error of you describe and (ii) incorrectly assuming that humans have not eaten coconut for a long time. AFAIK, coconuts have been around for millions of years (fossil evidence of coconuts 13 million years ago if I remember correctly) and humans have probably been eating them as long as their have been humans.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on September 08, 2010
at 10:03 PM

Trouble with eating more meat is that you go over your daily allowance of 1gm per 1kg lean mass -so also interested inthis post for ans as dairy gives me an insulin response

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on September 08, 2010
at 09:10 PM

@ David, I think you've misread (or not read) Dr. Harris' argument. He argues that dairy fat is superior to coconut because humans have a long history of eating animal fat and not a long history of eating coconut. So, he is (i) making the error of you describe and (ii) incorrectly assuming that humans have not eaten coconut for a long time. AFAIK, coconuts have been around for millions of years (fossil evidence of coconuts 13 million years ago if I remember correctly) and humans have probably been eating them as long as their have been humans.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on September 08, 2010
at 07:57 PM

Dr. Harris' point is that basing the healthfulness of a food on the length of time it has been consumed by humans is fallacious. One should examine the food based on metabolic merit, instead of rigorously adhering to reenactment dogma.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on September 08, 2010
at 07:51 PM

Thanks for relating your experience. The fat / weight gain is something I'll keep an eye out for. This will probably end up being a short experiment for me, and then I'll end up going with the lard suggestions.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 08, 2010
at 06:34 PM

Harris= metabolically paleo= "primal". Cordain= constitutionally paleo.

1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

(320)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:28 PM

Dr. Harris doesn't claim that dairy fat was consumed by our paleolithic ancestors, rather that its composition is biologically concordant with the em2.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:23 PM

@ Sal, macadamia nuts are great for MUFA, but not great for SFA. Total fat is 78% MUFA and 15% SFA. Animal fat is roughly equal portions of each (minus whatever PUFA there is), dairy is about 2.5 x as much SFA as MUFA.

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:18 PM

@ Sal: macadamia nuts are not high in sat fat -- 16% sat fat, 78% mono.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on September 08, 2010
at 05:42 PM

Thanks for all of the great comments so far, I've up-voted everyone, b/c they're each truly useful. PaleoHackers rule. I've got a (1/4 used) 5-gallon tub of Cocunut Oil in the pantry, but Harris' rationale for going with animal vs coconut is compelling. Seeing lots of "lard" responses. Should have been obvious to me, but I've honestly never used the stuff for cooking. The pork and lamb belly curries...will definitely give those a shot, too.

B4aa2df25a6bf17d22556667ff896170

(851)

on September 08, 2010
at 05:11 PM

coconut oil/milk, macadamia nuts are high in sat fat

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on September 08, 2010
at 04:54 PM

also, only on a paleo forum would someone lament the inability to get enough saturated fat! i love this community!

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13 Answers

best answer

2
Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 08, 2010
at 05:24 PM

I tried a PaleoNu type experiment with letting (primarily grass fed and/or organic) clarified butter, heavy cream, sour cream, and Greek yogurt into my diet for about 5 months this year. I gained about 8 pounds (50% fat, 50% lean), got loads of new PRs in the gym, and felt pretty good. Right now I am off the dairy, on a "100% paleo" schtick and I feel a LOT better -- entirely subjective. I have also lost about 2 pounds of pure fat from my frame in the past 3 weeks.

Yet, without the dairy I do find that it's not as easy to keep myself well supplied with fat.

I typically save any rendered bacon grease, chicken fat, or beef fat that gets made in my kitchen. But living in the South in the Summer time means that slow-roasting in the oven is no fun at all (think: 90 degrees in the kitchen). It's difficult to get lard or tallow in any quantity from pastured pigs or cows. And one week they ran out of bacon at the market! So I keep running out of fats.

Solution: eat more meat!

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on September 08, 2010
at 07:51 PM

Thanks for relating your experience. The fat / weight gain is something I'll keep an eye out for. This will probably end up being a short experiment for me, and then I'll end up going with the lard suggestions.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on September 08, 2010
at 10:03 PM

Trouble with eating more meat is that you go over your daily allowance of 1gm per 1kg lean mass -so also interested inthis post for ans as dairy gives me an insulin response

4
691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on September 08, 2010
at 04:52 PM

There are 115 calories in a tablespoon of lard. That's about 12 grams of fat. Adding fat like lard, tallow, chicken fat, bacon fat, duck fat (reserved from cooking) can help you hit your nutrient ratios.

I cook my eggs in a tablespoon or two of lard. I also grease pans with lard or coconut oil. Pouring some form of fat over your vegetables is also a good idea (or cook them in it). Cooking greens in bacon grease will add fat calories.

There is life after dairy, you just have to be resourceful and get sources for traditional animal fats lined up.

4
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 08, 2010
at 04:52 PM

Also, are we sure "Grok" didn't consume dairy sometimes? Of course, he didn't milk wild elk. But, what if the elk had a spear through it's neck? Did Grok just throw out the milk of his kill?

This has been beaten to death on other forums, but if you kill a lactating animal it's not like you get much milk. And many existing tribes have taboos against such killings for obvious reasons (that baby will be worth a lot more later).

Are you having inflammation issues or weight loss problems? If not, why worry about dairy? It might be interesting to do a dairy-free trial for a month or so to see what happens, but don't let perfect be the enemy of good.

On my dairy-free trials I typically rely heavily on lard, tallow, extremely fatty meats, and coconut fats. Typical meals would be braised pork belly and lamb belly coconut curry.

3
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 05, 2012
at 05:26 PM

No Dairy? How do you get enough Saturated Fat?

If loving lard is wrong, I don't want to be right...

A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on May 05, 2012
at 06:31 PM

Ha! Love it. What "quality" of lard should I be looking for? Organic, pasture raised, etc?

3
02736efa3fda31740e8890eed0cb663d

(1813)

on September 09, 2010
at 08:21 AM

The Chinese love them some pork belly, and so do I! Seriously though, pork belly stewed in rice wine with some spices and soy sauce is super delicious. In China they usually add sugar, but I've been trying to get around this by adding dried fruit or apples. Anyway, you can play around with it. Also, I'd just like to second (third?) the other's love of lard. If you can get the pork fat it's incredibly easy to render it, and the stuff keeps forever. The Chinese, being wiser than us about these things, have pork fat for sale everywhere. Finally, veggies cooked in lard are also super delicious.

3
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:54 AM

I don't find fault with Dr. Harris's preference of butter over coconut, but I do find the nitty-gritty somewhat specious:

-While coconut oil lacks cholesterol, buttery fat-soluble vitamins, etc...it probably doesn't matter if you're eating majority paleo/panu/primal.

-The fact that MCTs are metabolized differently than most fats is not a strike against coconuts unless there's a good reason for differential metabolism to be bad. Do Islander or Indian coastal populations have a higher burden of some disease that can be linked to heavy coconut consumption?

-The whole "similarity in fat profile" thing disregards the crux of paleo. That is, we don't know everything about how nutrients act in the body. Eating something that has been eaten for millenia (coconut) is probably not a bad thing, especially if you're Pacific Islander or South Indian. Butter's profile lines up with what is good for us, but a diet with much of its fat from butter is not tested that far back in our lineages. This is pure speculation, but maybe some hormonal crap or dioxins or something could be more concentrated in butter than in meat fat?

That being said, I really just want to see if there's more facts on this issue, as I'm a fat neophyte. Fat is such a huge part of our diets, that the type of fat being relied on is extremely important...can I get an Amen??

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 09, 2010
at 05:06 AM

If butter is bad for you, then they shouldn't have made it taste so good! ;-)

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 09, 2010
at 04:48 AM

Reverse disclaimer: I love butter and rarely eat coconut oil. In fact, I'm going to go dip my finger in the ghee jar right now.

1
403fe161656bb609e0ad142b897224f0

on November 12, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Does anyone else find that high amounts of dairy in their diet cause dry sky and itching? I'm not lactose intolerant, been tested, and have no digestion problems with straight up lactose. I've been SAD for awhile again (very sadly) and I've just gotten back into Paleo the last couple weeks, but doing the Dr. Harris approach and eating omelets and the like with glasses full of heavy cream. Also made some very lightly honey-sweetened ice cream with raw egg yolk and whipping cream, to not tire of the mass doses of dairy and keep up the fat levels. Unfortunately, I just can't tell what's wrong but man is my skin dry. I used to have trouble with eczema until I went paleo for a year, and having gone back on SAD my eczema did not return either (still ate coconut oil every day, so the lack of eczema I attribute to its antimicrobial properties), but now that I'm super high-dairy, my skin is insanely dry. I wonder if the high phosphorous content has something to do with it - google searches return some information on high phosphorous causing skin problems, and I've heard the same from others regarding dairy intake equating with skin issues. I wonder if we could be causing bone and skin and other problems with the phosphorous - or even the naturally present hormones, even in organic milk?, but lacking convenient alternatives yet, I'm continuing with the dairy a bit longer to see what happens....

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:00 AM

What different types of dairy products are you consuming, and what is the milk type?

1
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 10, 2010
at 04:01 AM

Beef. See if you can get grassfed beef tallow and then cook vegetables in it. Be sure to lick your plate if nobody is watching!

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 10, 2010
at 05:33 PM

I would assume something similar to 200mg omega 3 per tbs and 400mg omega 6 for good grassfed stuff.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 10, 2010
at 04:15 AM

Hey Stabby...I don't suppose you know the omega 3 and 6 content of grassfed beef tallow? I have this handy little spreadsheet with most of my foods' omega ratios in it, and I'd love to stick tallow in there. I assume it's similar to grassfed beef's ratio, but who knows?

A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on May 05, 2012
at 06:29 PM

Kamal, I am intrigued by this chart. Would you be willing to post it on your website?

1
15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:21 PM

I think both are good but I think Harris's argument is surprisingly bad. Humans have been eating coconut for a very long time, as far as I know. Coconuts have been around for millions of years, so it makes sense -- easy meal, fairly easy to obtain for a human. Think about it.

Dairy fat on the other hand would have been close to impossible for a human to consume before recent time (i.e., the advent of domestication). so, his logic would actually dictate the opposite conclusion to the one he arrives at...

That said, I think dairy and coconut are both great foods.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 08, 2010
at 06:34 PM

Harris= metabolically paleo= "primal". Cordain= constitutionally paleo.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:54 AM

And as for the prehistory facts, are you sure about our having eaten coconuts for that long? I honestly wouldn't bet any significant sum of money on it either way, but there is this from a little bit down on that same thread from Dr. H's forum: "Do you recall seeing many coconut palms in central africa or or northern europe? I don't."

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on September 08, 2010
at 11:10 PM

@ David, I think you've misread Dr. Harris' argument. He argues that dairy fat is superior to coconut because humans have a long history of eating animal fat and not a long history of eating coconut. So, he is (i) making the error of you describe and (ii) incorrectly assuming that humans have not eaten coconut for a long time. AFAIK, coconuts have been around for millions of years (fossil evidence of coconuts 13 million years ago if I remember correctly) and humans have probably been eating them as long as their have been humans.

1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

(320)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:28 PM

Dr. Harris doesn't claim that dairy fat was consumed by our paleolithic ancestors, rather that its composition is biologically concordant with the em2.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on September 08, 2010
at 07:57 PM

Dr. Harris' point is that basing the healthfulness of a food on the length of time it has been consumed by humans is fallacious. One should examine the food based on metabolic merit, instead of rigorously adhering to reenactment dogma.

Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 11, 2010
at 03:35 AM

Harris argues, throughout his blog, that we needn't discard foods that are neolithic just for that fact alone, but that we ought to consider giving up neolithic foods if they have a high probability of being related to modern diseases. He does not endorse dairy in every sense, in fact, he recommends ditching dairy UNLESS you have trouble meeting calorie needs without all the carbs. A fully compliant "PaleoNu" diet is dairy-free. See rule #12 at http://www.paleonu.com/get-started/

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on September 08, 2010
at 09:10 PM

@ David, I think you've misread (or not read) Dr. Harris' argument. He argues that dairy fat is superior to coconut because humans have a long history of eating animal fat and not a long history of eating coconut. So, he is (i) making the error of you describe and (ii) incorrectly assuming that humans have not eaten coconut for a long time. AFAIK, coconuts have been around for millions of years (fossil evidence of coconuts 13 million years ago if I remember correctly) and humans have probably been eating them as long as their have been humans.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:52 AM

Jay, if you look more closely at what he says, that's not quite right. He might be speaking a little loosely, but I can assure you that even if he brings up our prehistory the metabolic facts come first. Thus: "We don't really know that much about any unique consequences of eating the MCTs in coconut and their first pass metabolism through the liver." And: "Coconut has zero n-3 fatty acids. Coconut has no vitamin K2 or CLA or carnitite or B12."

Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 11, 2010
at 03:37 AM

Also, Rule #2... Harris clearly endorses coconut fats.

0
B46316c795e7a59e9c5f668eb0375c03

on May 05, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Hey peeps.

Read over some of the forum, and have a few questions. As of April 15th, 2012, I've been 99% dairy free(had to have a piece of cake and some icecream for my daughters 2nd birthday). I've also been trying to stay away from Saturated fat, I do drink about 1 carton of soy milk a day. Anyhow, I've knowticed my fat level decreaseing but I'm craving some type of substitue. I'm about to go and make some stove top popcorn, (3 tbs oil, 1/2 cup kernals), and wonder if the canola oil/ olive oil is an acceptable substitute? My wife is helping me stay away from the dairy, hopefully for good, but I'm scared to introduce any other kinds of fat back into my life due to weight gain. I hear in Italy, they substitute olive oil and vinegar for ketchup.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Damon

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:08 AM

"I've also been trying to stay away from Saturated fat, I do drink about 1 carton of soy milk a day...", "I'm about to go and make some stove top popcorn, (3 tbs oil, 1/2 cup kernals), and wonder if the canola oil/ olive oil is an acceptable substitute?" I'd recommend some more research into what a Paleo diet is all about. Once you're comfortable with the ideas behind it you'll not want to consume soy, corn and canola. There's loads of help and advice here on PH for the asking.

D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on May 06, 2012
at 01:50 AM

Stay away from soy, stop avoiding saturated fat. Canola oil is far down the list of acceptable in typical Paleo menus. Consider butter or coconut oil. Read "The Paleo Solution", "Ignore the Awkward", or "Good Calories, Bad Calories" for why saturated fat has been unfairly demonized.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 05, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Why are you afraid of eating fat? Saturated fat, in moderation, is very good for you, and entirely necessary for good health.

0
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 10, 2010
at 02:16 PM

I dont wanna add more contention here (and i dont wanna go too too far WAP) but is anyone considering the pasteurization process's affects on the butter/dairy? Even if its 100% grass-fed from happy cows, if it is pasteurized shouldn't we worry a little about the damage to the otherwise healthy fats in it? While coconut oil would perhaps be less damaged from its own processing?

Just putting it out there (im an equal lover of CO and butter - usually my CO with lunch and butter with dinner).

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on November 12, 2010
at 11:19 PM

It was pointed out to me that there is butter and then there is sweet cream butter. I thought there was no such thing. (only salted and unsalted) So, I looked and some package ingredients say made with sweet cream but there is also butter stating: cream So, my question is (splitting hairs) is butter (ingredient: cream) more processed than butter (made with sweet cream) because they removed something...just wondering...:)

0
5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on September 10, 2010
at 01:12 PM

macadamia nuts rock, because they are so universal. you can take them to the office, or on a hike, etc. excellent energy source and snack. and eggs, of course.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 10, 2010
at 04:26 PM

.. and eat half a bag at one sitting. ;-) I just can't have them at home, too good!

0
72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on September 09, 2010
at 02:52 AM

I can't find any greek yogurt that is grass fed and I think grass fed is more important than anything else when it comes to dairy. I eat like a quart of full fat yogurt / day and I've been having some pretty good results (been doing it for about a month... swiched from 2-3 cups of full fat fage). Anyone have any suggestions for grass fed greek yogurt?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 09, 2010
at 03:45 AM

Hey Krish, this stuff is not Greek, but I think it's 50% calories from fat: http://www.tpforganics.com/ Traders Point Creamery whole milk yogurt. Surprisingly widely available for a grass-fed product. Midwest and east coast mostly; you can see the locations on their site. And oh yeah it's probably the best yogurt I've ever tasted.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on September 09, 2010
at 04:37 AM

Wagon Creek Creamery raises grassfed dairy cows. Here's their product page, which lists Greek Yogurt: http://wagoncreekcreamery.com/products.html Their online ordering page isn't working, but you might be able to contact them...here's the contact info: http://wagoncreekcreamery.com/dairy.html

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