2

votes

Muscle Gain vs Paleo

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 10, 2012 at 5:15 PM

I started Paleo/Primal about a month ago, and so far I have been very happy with my results. Prior to starting this lifestyle, I was a cardio queen. As of few weeks ago, I stopped my cardio and started lifting weights. In three weeks I dropped about 5 lbs. My goal is to initially build muscle for the first month, then slowly add low-intensity cardio in the second month, and lean out in the third month with sprints.

My question is related to macronutrients and carbs. I was advised by a PT that I should eat lots of carbs 40C/40P/20F. This is a bodybuilder's diet. Since I am doing Paleo/Primal, my diet is around 15C/25P/60F, which contradicts the information I was given to me by my PT. Should I eat more carbs in the form of startchy veggies, or can I still reach my goal by sticking to my current macros.

Current weight is 130lbs - 23% BF

Goal Weight 115-120lbs - 15% BF.

Thanks!

C2b67e9efa9765dc279a1b727e7391b4

(178)

on June 16, 2012
at 07:50 PM

love that show!

D5c8768927c463b363b109f18b7c16c4

(375)

on January 11, 2012
at 10:28 AM

It could be just personal trainer...

15480ad0efe9168bc518967b9a2e240d

(608)

on January 10, 2012
at 06:39 PM

Nice! I like your explanation. I do want to get semi cut, but no means ever be one of the fitness/bik competition type of body builders. I usually do 4 workouts a week and I am fine the next day. I don't time my eating. I eat when I'm hungry which is about an hour after waking up and then in the afternoon and after a workout/dinner time. So I feel better knowing I can reach my goals without following their diet of loading up on carbs and proteins and sticking to low fat.

15480ad0efe9168bc518967b9a2e240d

(608)

on January 10, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Thanks, I didn't want to change my macros, but people are constantly telling me that in order to gain muscle i have to eat high carb/high protein. Someone also argued with me by stating that people who are on high protein as much as 200+ grams have lower body fat vs those who are low carb and weigh less have more fat. I'd rather have something sustainable rather than having to gorge on protein and carbs every hour like they are suggesting.

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6 Answers

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2
3a9aef29f44d81785622400b60fc5e14

on January 10, 2012
at 05:40 PM

From my research I don't think you should need that much carbs, especially for your strength phase. Your current ratio should suit you fine, maybe add a little more in the morning.

From my experience the timing of your macros and when you excessive relative to your meals and light cycles will influence your muscle gain much more. Some stuff I have been experimenting with recently and seem to be really helping is eating 50% of my carbs in the morning along with a good helping of fat and protein. Then distributing the other half of carbs into lunch and dinner. It will also help to plan your workout to end withing an hour of your lunch or dinner. Also add a little more protein at dinner. And as for your protein levels, do not go near 40% because this can be harmful and cause nitrate poisoning (unless you are very low carb and you convert the extra protein into glucose). That's just my opinion, hopefully it helps!

3
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on January 10, 2012
at 05:34 PM

I've read of other bodybuilders diets that are 30P/10C/60F (Dave Palumbo's Ketogenic diet).

Ask a dozen people, you'll get a dozen answers.

Pick one that makes sense to you, try it. If you like it great. If not, tweak from there.

You're not in any kind of a race.

15480ad0efe9168bc518967b9a2e240d

(608)

on January 10, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Thanks, I didn't want to change my macros, but people are constantly telling me that in order to gain muscle i have to eat high carb/high protein. Someone also argued with me by stating that people who are on high protein as much as 200+ grams have lower body fat vs those who are low carb and weigh less have more fat. I'd rather have something sustainable rather than having to gorge on protein and carbs every hour like they are suggesting.

2
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 10, 2012
at 06:32 PM

The answer is... it depends, but you probably don't want to eat your PT's diet.

First off, the diet. This is a simple mass building diet, usually for guys (with the testosterone boost and all). You're not going to get the same muscle as a man without a lot of work. This breakdown is also not necessarily what the women eat (so you'll want to watch out for that).

The reason for the high carbs in the bodybuilder diet is multifold. 1) Replenish glycogen as fast as possible and 2) Spike insulin to get more nutrients into the muscle and repair it as fast as possible.

They're lifting a lot of weight to exhaustion, using weight progression (increasing the weight each exercise session) damaging the muscles with microtears, etc. It usually works fairly well for them. But they do gain a LOT of bodyfat as well as muscle. After they get to their goal, they go on a cutting diet to remove the fat (they don't stay at that 40/40/20 macro breakdown 100% of the time).

The impression I got from your post is that you just want better muscle/health, and aren't looking to become a bodybuilder. So you've got more leeway to work with in terms of exercising. What you usually see on the lower carb Paleo diet is slower recovery, as measured by being able to lift less weight overall in the next weightlifting session. Bodybuilders have a hard time doing those heavy lifting sessions 3+ times a week on low carb. You on the other hand could do 2 or 1 session a week with no problems. There's not really a rule of thumb here, you'll need to analyze things for yourself as you go along.

You need to track your weight lifting. Simplest thing, exercise, weight, # of reps. Multiply weight x reps to get an overall number for the exercise. Do your exercises to exhaustion, and compare sessions for the same muscle/exercise. If you have a hard time reaching/exceeding those numbers the next time at the gym, add more carbs afterwards. If not, you're good the way you're going.

15480ad0efe9168bc518967b9a2e240d

(608)

on January 10, 2012
at 06:39 PM

Nice! I like your explanation. I do want to get semi cut, but no means ever be one of the fitness/bik competition type of body builders. I usually do 4 workouts a week and I am fine the next day. I don't time my eating. I eat when I'm hungry which is about an hour after waking up and then in the afternoon and after a workout/dinner time. So I feel better knowing I can reach my goals without following their diet of loading up on carbs and proteins and sticking to low fat.

1
303067c2b030e85c82f1bd09095225ae

(205)

on January 10, 2012
at 05:35 PM

As Dave Hester from Storage Wars says " YEEEEEEEEEEP"

C2b67e9efa9765dc279a1b727e7391b4

(178)

on June 16, 2012
at 07:50 PM

love that show!

0
Medium avatar

(3259)

on January 10, 2012
at 06:27 PM

For what it's worth, I'm not sure I would follow a PT's advice on nutrition (assuming "PT" means physiotherapist). My PT is AMAZING and has changed my life from a biomechanical perspective. He's unbelievably accomplished, published, works with professional and olympic athletes, is the PT to elite military special forces, does chiropractic, acupuncture, ART, FMS... He literally turned me into a new person in one year. He also advises me to become vegetarian, thinks meat causes colon cancer, and listed "french toast with syrup" (make sure it's whole wheat!) as an excellent breakfast option.

I would at least find out what your PT's advice and knowledge is rooted in.

D5c8768927c463b363b109f18b7c16c4

(375)

on January 11, 2012
at 10:28 AM

It could be just personal trainer...

0
D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on January 10, 2012
at 05:34 PM

Stick with your macros for now. If you find you have recovery issues, then experiment with adding in a few more safe starches. I'd never go as high as 40% protein...on a 2000 cal diet, that's 200 g protein! Remember, personal trainers need zero education in nutrition and many of them rely on broscience.

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