20

votes

Is a saturated fat plus high glucose meal a dangerous combination?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 06, 2010 at 1:50 AM

both loren cordain and arthur devany are saying that eating saturated fat and glucose together at the same meal is a dangerous combination. i love blueberries with coconut milk. would that count as being dangerous?

E7adfe31507efb7c935f618a829f56d6

(1507)

on March 05, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Interesting comments below, but no mention of the fact that blueberries are low glycemic load, so perhaps less likely to be a "deadly" addition to fat intake. Disclaimer: I love this combo like whoa, so I might be reaching :)

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 02, 2011
at 03:21 AM

there are 4 SFA and stearic does not raise TC levels....infact it lowers it.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 01, 2011
at 07:04 PM

chris masterjohn provided a pretty solid rebuttal as well... http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2010/10/is-butter-high-in-ages.html

2bdf9a3d29c3fa0bf93ceb8ca53015c4

(40)

on September 20, 2010
at 08:22 PM

I've heard this lots as well, but it's hard to find specific data on it for the variables Melissa mentioned.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on September 20, 2010
at 06:15 PM

In the book Nourishing Traditions, there is a mention of a synergistic combination between sweet potato and butter.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on September 20, 2010
at 06:14 PM

Peter at Hyperlipid has talked about this. Insulin resistance from saturated fat would seem to make sense, if the result was to keep that glucose from going to peripheral organs, which can run off the fat, and leave the glucose available for the brain and blood cells instead.

Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 08, 2010
at 05:29 PM

Matthew, can you link to a study about insulin resistance and long chain fatty acids? I seem to remember this topic being dealt with -- harshly -- on the Hyperlipid blog, where it turned out the fat used in the supporting study was 17% trans-fats from Proctor and Gamble.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 08, 2010
at 11:15 PM

I'll try to dig up some stuff from Prof DeVany's site since he agrees that saturated fat and high glucose meals are dangerous together.

424563ee2575f0620ea221badabb40d7

(272)

on July 08, 2010
at 06:18 PM

thank you, vmary. That talk, together with the comments, is one of the most important sources I've encountered. Do you have any similar ones?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on May 06, 2010
at 04:40 AM

It's hard to find studies about this because anything about fat+sugar seems to involve HFCS+Soy Oil or something else dreadful

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on May 06, 2010
at 03:36 AM

Do you have any links to articles where they mention this?

703331bec3d551d21d2178f60c9963c1

(587)

on May 06, 2010
at 03:06 AM

Saturated fat + high glucose sounds like every meal on the SAD. I think you'll be just fine with coconut milk and blueberries. Better yet, add some almond butter to that and whip it up with a little heavy cream.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on May 06, 2010
at 01:56 AM

Great question!!

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9 Answers

10
3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

on May 06, 2010
at 02:51 AM

Dangerous combination? Try delicious combination. If blueberries and coconut milk are both healthy on their own (and they are), it strikes me as unlikely that they'd somehow turn deadly when eaten together. In fact, I think they both kind of suck on their own (not that I'm above drinking coconut milk straight from the can; it's just so much better with other foods, and likewise for blueberries). Other saturated fat/glucose combinations I'd recommend include sweet potatoes with butter, root vegetables with tallow, and berries with cream.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on September 20, 2010
at 06:15 PM

In the book Nourishing Traditions, there is a mention of a synergistic combination between sweet potato and butter.

5
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 07, 2010
at 02:22 AM

here is a link to a loren cordain interview where he references studies on the dangers of saturated fat and a high glucose meal.

http://www.meandmydiabetes.com/2010/03/24/loren-cordain-caution-on-saturated-fats-disaster-with-grains-will-be-public-after-march-25th/

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 08, 2010
at 11:15 PM

I'll try to dig up some stuff from Prof DeVany's site since he agrees that saturated fat and high glucose meals are dangerous together.

424563ee2575f0620ea221badabb40d7

(272)

on July 08, 2010
at 06:18 PM

thank you, vmary. That talk, together with the comments, is one of the most important sources I've encountered. Do you have any similar ones?

5
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on May 06, 2010
at 04:16 PM

I can see how the theory behind this idea could work.

Long chain saturated fats, like palmitic acid, can induce insulin resistance. In a diet lower in carbs this is probably not be a problem. But maybe eating a large quantitiy of saturated fat together with a large quantity of glucose or starch could cause a problems.

Regularly reducing your insulin resistance at the same time as flooding your blood with glucose is unlikely to be a good idea. Muscle resistance to insulin would mean more glucose would be converted to fat and more of the fat would be pushed into the fat cells by the high insulin.

It would be likely to be irrelevant in the case of fruit and cream, the amount of glucose quite low. I don't think it would apply to coconut fat anyway as there is not much long chain fatty acids in it.

How relevant any of this is is another question.

Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on September 08, 2010
at 05:29 PM

Matthew, can you link to a study about insulin resistance and long chain fatty acids? I seem to remember this topic being dealt with -- harshly -- on the Hyperlipid blog, where it turned out the fat used in the supporting study was 17% trans-fats from Proctor and Gamble.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on September 20, 2010
at 06:14 PM

Peter at Hyperlipid has talked about this. Insulin resistance from saturated fat would seem to make sense, if the result was to keep that glucose from going to peripheral organs, which can run off the fat, and leave the glucose available for the brain and blood cells instead.

4
Fcaeaac15cf6568f2825b230731d5a7d

(529)

on May 06, 2010
at 05:26 AM

This sounds like it is along the same lines as Dr. Davis' butter makes you fat nonsense, to which Peter at hyperlipid provided a sound rebuttal.

The gist of Peter's post is that although saturated fat may raise your insulin levels a bit higher than other fats when taken with glucose, saturated fat turns you into a fat burning machine, so who cares?

My personal opinion is that it is this overriding fear of saturated fat that has led to the obesity epidemic, and the sooner we all get over it the better!

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 01, 2011
at 07:04 PM

chris masterjohn provided a pretty solid rebuttal as well... http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2010/10/is-butter-high-in-ages.html

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 02, 2011
at 03:21 AM

there are 4 SFA and stearic does not raise TC levels....infact it lowers it.

3
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 06, 2010
at 03:29 PM

I would say it depends on how much sugar. A serving or two of blueberries and coconut cream is probably fine. Once you get up over some threshold of sugar, though, your insulin levels will rise too much. That's when the combination of sugar and fat becomes a problem.

3
0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

on May 06, 2010
at 02:11 PM

I think Melissa has it nailed. Often in mainstream studies, rats are fed "saturated fat" from a hydrogenated vegetable oil, and that is inferred as applicable to human nutrition/metabolism. Weak science, downright fraudulent "science".

A processed chow of HFCS and hydrogenated soybean oil (for example) fed to rats is in no way natural for the rat, and in no way should be extrapolated to its impact in human health. There is certainly a big difference between natural fats (butter, cream, cheese, tallow, coconut etc) and natural carbohydrate (potatoes, yams, berries, etc) and the industrial chow used in studies.

1
5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on September 21, 2010
at 08:26 AM

I don't think you have anything to worry. There isn't a great amount of fructose in blueberries anyway and you would only be eating a cupful or so at a time. I say enjoy in moderation if you need to.

1
341f6b482f50cf817b37b083f085d80a

on September 20, 2010
at 04:40 PM

'my opinion' depends how much you are burning... and how much visceral fat you have - if you are sitting all day in front of computer and not burning it off - it will stay floating around which I guess is not a good thing. I have mixed feelings about fructose - I seem to remember it still raises you blood sugar levels just like glucose... Balance and a little bit of everything in moderation minus the worrying. Once the worrying kicks in about it then you have cancelled out any benefit at all.

1
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on May 06, 2010
at 03:42 AM

It depends--on your individual glucose tolerance, your total daily carbohydrate intake, your goals (eg., weight loss vs. weight gain), and serving size. If berries and coconut milk or berries and cream fit into your overall diet program, and you continue to progress towards your goals, I say go for it--and enjoy. If you're counting carbs, blueberries have about 7gm of total sugar and about 3.5gm of fructose per 100gm serving ( http://www.reducetriglycerides.com/reader_triglycerides_low_fructose_fruit.htm , scroll to bottom of page for fruit sugar table).

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