1

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Good fat on a meal plan

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 12, 2012 at 12:18 AM

As a college kid with a meal plan, it is really hard to eat what I want and to know exactly what I am eating.

I really want to increase my fat intake as an experiment, but with the cafeteria food, I am not sure how to do that. I know they use conventional meat, so I know I should avoid that fat.

I have coconut oil in my room that I try to eat as much as I can, but can anyone suggest relatively safe and common ways I can get more good fat out of the cafeteria food?

I want to increase my fat up to about 50% of my daily intake. I have done ketosis and all of that before, but I didn't increase my fat that much, so maybe this time if I do, ketosis will be more successful for me.

Any thoughts would be great, thanks!

5f678ffff153bfc8a17ac1ee438c054f

(1405)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:20 PM

The only butter they have out is in this big vat by the toasters. I am not sure if it is margarine though. I will have to investigate! Thanks!

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 12, 2012
at 02:14 PM

Agree about the butter. The cafeteria(s) on campus probably have some kind of plain steamed veggie option now and then -- a perfect vehicle for adding butter! (Even if it's regular ol' supermarket butter and not blessed by the gods and unicorns...still better than soybean oil!) Also a good call on buying your own olive oil -- even a very good brand would last you a while and cost about as much as a few coffees from Starbucks.

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1 Answers

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on December 12, 2012
at 12:27 AM

Olive oil and butter are usually available in some form. They might be low quality, so try to find some labels or ask someone. There are ultra-light olive oils that are probably super-processed and have almost no nutritional value, and lots of restaurants and cafeterias seem to want to replace butter with some kind of faux butter oil mixture. But if you can find real olive oil or butter, that is not a bad choice.

You could go to the grocery store and spend $10 for a bottle of olive oil which might last you a few weeks. When I get a salad from a salad bar, I get it without dressing, and dress it at home with high quality olive oil, vinegar or lemon, salt, and pepper. Obviously you can buy butter too. Seth Roberts performed an experiment where he ate butter regularly, and actually improved his arterial health.

High quality fats are expensive and are not usually available in cheap cafeteria food, in fact I think this is one of the main causes of the epidemic health problems in our society, the removal of good fats from the primary food system. So you will probably have to go out of your way to find them, unfortunately.

5f678ffff153bfc8a17ac1ee438c054f

(1405)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:20 PM

The only butter they have out is in this big vat by the toasters. I am not sure if it is margarine though. I will have to investigate! Thanks!

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 12, 2012
at 02:14 PM

Agree about the butter. The cafeteria(s) on campus probably have some kind of plain steamed veggie option now and then -- a perfect vehicle for adding butter! (Even if it's regular ol' supermarket butter and not blessed by the gods and unicorns...still better than soybean oil!) Also a good call on buying your own olive oil -- even a very good brand would last you a while and cost about as much as a few coffees from Starbucks.

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