1

votes

Do calories in meat include the grease?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 29, 2012 at 11:58 PM

I tried to find an answer everywhere for this but everyone's talking about bacon when it says on the label "pan fried". I bought a couple pounds of pork today to make sausage out of, and the label just says "4 oz" as the serving size. So I'm assuming this will include any grease that's left in the pan after cooking the 4 oz?

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:12 PM

are you looking at exactly the same qty? and for raw?

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:56 AM

Most likely a difference between the FDA database and observed or tested results.

3a4aa1abbbd85326bbf5b2e473cf3cfb

on April 30, 2012
at 02:55 AM

The database says 252 calories while the label says around 380. So I'm guessing it includes the fat that is left in the pan as well?

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

best answer

3
03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 30, 2012
at 01:02 PM

Multiply the serving size by the number of servings, and see if anything is missing. For instance, a pound (16 ounces) of bacon may say a serving is 1/4 ounce, "pan-fried". If there are 16 slices, that only adds up to 4 ounces, so they aren't counting the other 12 ounces of fat that cook out of it.

On the other hand, if your pound of sausage says there are four 4-ounce servings, everything is being counted, and they're reporting (approximately) the nutrition information for the product as-is. So to get those good fat calories, you're going to have to cook some eggs or potatoes in the leftover grease to soak it up!

6
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on April 30, 2012
at 12:22 AM

It's a complicated question, actually. The FDA has five methods for determining caloric load including actual lab analysis, composite data taken from their (massive) food nutrition database, and a 4-4-9 rule (4 calories for each gram of carbohydrate and protein, 9 calories for each gram of fat).

Foods that are lab-tested are done in their "production" state, so if the package lists a specific cooking method (like "pan fried"), they're possibly sending pan-fried bacon to the lab for testing. However, since lab testing is expensive, they're most likely looking up "Bacon, 70-80% lean, pan-fried" and using that number.

It gets more interesting for food that will be further "processed" at home. Producers are selling what, to them, is a finished product that will be modified later by, at minimum, cooking and possibly more (i.e. trimming all of the fat), so they have to go with the maximum calories contained in their raw product. If the producer is doing testing, they'll usually send a few kilogram batches of product to the lab, representing a cross section of the current meat shipment. Those numbers will come back, and they'll label the product either using a high-weighted average number or "contains no more than" language using the highest value. Again, though, the testing is expensive, so most of the time, producers will go find the entry for "Pork Loin, Raw, Industrial Farmed, 4 oz. Portion" and just use that number.

A bunch of manufacturers will also use the database information and send their products out to an independent lab for testing to insure that the foods are falling within the tolerance levels set by the FDA. McDonalds is one company that I know of that has an internal division for this, and they regularly use independent labs to verify their results. I suspect they do this to pick the numbers so they never get fined by the FDA; if their internal testing comes out lower, use the database numbers, otherwise use the highest result.

3
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on April 30, 2012
at 12:03 AM

I leave the fat on the griddle and cook my next meal in it....so for me yes, yes it does.

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on April 30, 2012
at 03:01 PM

I just log with the NAL/USDA entries and use the raw weight/calories of whatever meat I am eating.

Seeing as I usually cook a steak and then pour any lost "drippings" on top of the steak before eating, I guess it should count.

Same with ground meats.

0
E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on April 30, 2012
at 02:17 AM

Go to Nutritional Database and look up the closest type of pork you have. Because you are making sausage I am assuming it is ground pork.

here is the result for ground pork it will give both cooked and raw values.compare those with your label. adjust portions.

3a4aa1abbbd85326bbf5b2e473cf3cfb

on April 30, 2012
at 02:55 AM

The database says 252 calories while the label says around 380. So I'm guessing it includes the fat that is left in the pan as well?

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:56 AM

Most likely a difference between the FDA database and observed or tested results.

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:12 PM

are you looking at exactly the same qty? and for raw?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!