1

votes

Coconut oil and fruit question

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 08, 2012 at 4:31 PM

I Am trying to do this. I am a registered dietitian and the thought of coconut oil goes against anything I have ever learned. And limiting my fruit intake is something i dont want to do as thats my source of fiber and vitamins. Thoughts? I'm just not comfortable with thses two parts. Thanks!

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:24 PM

It's pricey, but so delicious. Delicious on fruit with soft goat cheese if you eat dairy. I never cook with it because I want to really be able to savor the flavor.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:17 PM

The popcorn coconut oil is hydrogenated. Bleh, why would anyone hydrogenate coconut oil? Anyway, it is full of transfats. You can find good quality coconut oil at health food stores, in Asian markets and online merchants. Amazon sells a number of good brands.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:13 PM

Olive oil isn't as good for cooking since the smoke point is lower. Olive oil also has higher O6 content and many people try to keep not only the O3:O6 ratio down, but they try to keep PUFAs of all kinds down. So they'll reserve olive oil for salads or table side drizzle where the flavor is important.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:05 PM

Limiting fruit intake is mostly for people with metabolic problems like insulin resistance who need to stay low carb, or people who want to lose weight. Even low carbers often find a way to eat berries.

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 09, 2012
at 03:20 PM

@CaveMan_Mike glad to hear it helped you and could potentially even convince some of your coworkers of the benefits of saturated fats and coconut oil. :)

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 09, 2012
at 02:30 PM

That's 3 words :-) I don't see macademia nut oil in my cronometer, but I think it has substantially more omega 6 than does coconut oil.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 09, 2012
at 02:25 PM

+1 for the mercola link which is written in an easy to understand way. I ended up forwarding it to my boss & co-worker as we were having a mini debate about saturated fats: good or bad. Thanks @Ben!

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:53 AM

I'm not sure why you couldn't use either. Olive oil and coconut oil are both great oils. When I buy coconut oil I go with virgin coconut oil, which can come in tubs, jars, etc.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:52 AM

I'm not sure why you couldn't use either. Olive oil and coconut oil are both great oils. I say go with virgin coconut oil, which can come in tubs, jars, etc.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:04 AM

(And the glut of n-6 in the standard American diet is itself inflammatory, so it's a double whammy.) But it's really nice to hear a dietician connect the dots between insulin resistance/blood glucose control problems and whole grains. :) You are a welcome voice! Grains might be okay for some people, but not everyone, and certainly not in the quantities we're recommended to eat.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:02 AM

Yeah, the inflammation is a major factor, as is the degree of oxidation of the fatty acids in the membranes of the lipoproteins themselves that can lead to atherosclerosis. And how do they incorporate oxidized fatty acids? Lots of chemically unstable polyunsaturated vegetable and seed oils - margarine, soybean oil, cottonseed, sunflower, safflower, etc. The more saturated fats are your safest for cooking since they're the most stable when heated and least prone to oxidation.

65a71b413326bad1894eafdaf8260a7d

on June 09, 2012
at 01:00 AM

Why can't I use olive oil versus coconut though? It's not from a seed. If I do use coconut oil, are you purchasing the tub-like shortening that we use for our popcorn maker? ....

65a71b413326bad1894eafdaf8260a7d

on June 09, 2012
at 12:57 AM

No offense to your question Amy as I am really struggling with this. The issue in saturated fats is related to their effect on LDL production and atherosclerosis. That said, I do understand that inflammation can be more the culprit than the fat itself. This eating high fruits and veggies provide many anti-oxidants. Regarding whole grains, I do think insulin intolerance is a result of too much sugar in our diet Andon I'm willing to forgo the grains but not the fruits. From reading the responses, fruit seems to be more a personal choice for weight loss. I love fruit and won't let that go :)

3ed47bb3513ed0b4849e6b492422cadf

(90)

on June 09, 2012
at 12:24 AM

You will not get a better source on the wonders of Coconuts and V Coconut Oil than this one :) https://www.facebook.com/pages/Health-by-Coconut/118415791512376

C1484e8cfca0cc00f40da25d36f689b8

(374)

on June 08, 2012
at 06:06 PM

This is true, which is why I said they "are at times better choices". It was not my intention to put a negative light on coconut oil. I happen to use both, sometimes together. :)

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

(1453)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Bananas are mostly glucose, very little fructose, and are considered a "safe starch." There are also scientists who maintain that the whole need for fiber is vastly overrated, another harmful dietary myth. http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/fiber/a-cautionary-tale-of-mucus-fore-and-aft/ Basically you need to rethink virtually everything you were ever taught as a dietician, I'd guess -- according to Paleo-informed science most of it is wrong.

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:34 PM

But coconut oil contains lauric acid instead of those vitamins... It's no 'one is better than the other', they both have there own advantages and both can have a place in a healthy diet.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Good info here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/05/31/coconut-oil-for-healthy-heart.aspx

D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:46 PM

Fiber and vitamins can be gotten from vegetables. You know which vegetables contain which vitamins, eat enough and a good variety to satisfy this requirement. As for coconut oil, you might have some problems re-learning about saturated fats, but someone here will be able to point you to good resources concerning that. Welcome!

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8 Answers

8
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:36 PM

I think this article, from a talk by Mary Enig, is a good explanation of why coconut oil is healthy.

Also, in this meta analysis of 60 dietary trials the authors stated: ???Lauric acid had a more favorable effect on total:HDL cholesterol than any other fatty acid???. Lauric acid is the main fat in coconut oil and total:HDL cholesterol ratio is easily one of the best current predictors of heart disease risk.

You could make the case that coconut oil has no vitamins and minerals, which is valid. And some people also report sensitivity to it. However, there's an significant amount of evidence showing coconut oil produces better effects on health than almost every vegetable oil out there. If you're going to use an oil, go with coconut oil over soybean oil every day of the week.

And I don't think you should have to limit fruit intake. There's no reason to think fruit isn't healthy, some people just do better limiting it. For most people though fruit is fine, great even.

65a71b413326bad1894eafdaf8260a7d

on June 09, 2012
at 01:00 AM

Why can't I use olive oil versus coconut though? It's not from a seed. If I do use coconut oil, are you purchasing the tub-like shortening that we use for our popcorn maker? ....

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:52 AM

I'm not sure why you couldn't use either. Olive oil and coconut oil are both great oils. I say go with virgin coconut oil, which can come in tubs, jars, etc.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:13 PM

Olive oil isn't as good for cooking since the smoke point is lower. Olive oil also has higher O6 content and many people try to keep not only the O3:O6 ratio down, but they try to keep PUFAs of all kinds down. So they'll reserve olive oil for salads or table side drizzle where the flavor is important.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:53 AM

I'm not sure why you couldn't use either. Olive oil and coconut oil are both great oils. When I buy coconut oil I go with virgin coconut oil, which can come in tubs, jars, etc.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:17 PM

The popcorn coconut oil is hydrogenated. Bleh, why would anyone hydrogenate coconut oil? Anyway, it is full of transfats. You can find good quality coconut oil at health food stores, in Asian markets and online merchants. Amazon sells a number of good brands.

4
1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:46 PM

When getting into paleo, one of the first things you have to do is starting to get to appreciate (saturated) fats. These have been demonized in the 'convential' dietary community for so long, and I can understand it's hard to see that there could possibly be any benefit in them. This sums it up pretty well, and better than I can do here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/10/22/coconut-oil-and-saturated-fats-can-make-you-healthy.aspx

As for fruit intake: the reason why you should restrict your fruit intake is to reduce the amount of fructose you're taking. Fructose is pretty much like ethanol (alcohol) to the liver, so too much of it can cause fatty liver (non-alcoholic fatty liver is very often caused by a fructose intake that is too high). This doesn't mean that you should stop eating fruit altogether (of course not), it just means you shouldn't eat too much of it. Many people have fructose intolerance too, but that's another story.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 09, 2012
at 02:25 PM

+1 for the mercola link which is written in an easy to understand way. I ended up forwarding it to my boss & co-worker as we were having a mini debate about saturated fats: good or bad. Thanks @Ben!

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 09, 2012
at 03:20 PM

@CaveMan_Mike glad to hear it helped you and could potentially even convince some of your coworkers of the benefits of saturated fats and coconut oil. :)

3
C1484e8cfca0cc00f40da25d36f689b8

(374)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Unsaturated fats are prone to oxidation. Unsaturation is a fancy way of saying that the carbons share 4 electrons instead of 2. This increased electron density enables electrophiles (molecules that are thirsty for electrons) to attack it. This is what causes the fat to become oxidized. Oxygen can be an electrophile and oxidize these fats. Oxidized fats are no good, for the fat or for our bodies. In making seed oils (canola, corn, etc), high temperatures are used, and since oxygen is present, most of those oils tend to be oxidized by the time they are purchased. We produce large amounts of oxygen compounds in our bodies that can also do this oxidation internally. Since the double bond is the area that is being oxidized, a saturated fat (like coconut oil), which does not have double bonds, is not likely to be oxidized. They also contain an evolutionarily novel amount of omega-6 fatty acids, which can significantly alter the bodies omega 6/3 ratio if they are consumed in appreciable amounts.

You don't have to eat coconut oil, high quality animal fats like lard or tallow are at times better choices as they contain nutrients (vitamin A, D, CLA) that coconut oil does not.

You also don't have to limit your fruit intake. It may or may not stall weight loss efforts, but there is no rule that you must limit fruit.

C1484e8cfca0cc00f40da25d36f689b8

(374)

on June 08, 2012
at 06:06 PM

This is true, which is why I said they "are at times better choices". It was not my intention to put a negative light on coconut oil. I happen to use both, sometimes together. :)

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:34 PM

But coconut oil contains lauric acid instead of those vitamins... It's no 'one is better than the other', they both have there own advantages and both can have a place in a healthy diet.

1
68e1ce58aa4747bcef0ee051185c2961

on June 09, 2012
at 01:46 PM

One word; macademia nut oil. It is delicious and is 80% monounsaturated--no trans fats. Totally paleo.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:24 PM

It's pricey, but so delicious. Delicious on fruit with soft goat cheese if you eat dairy. I never cook with it because I want to really be able to savor the flavor.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 09, 2012
at 02:30 PM

That's 3 words :-) I don't see macademia nut oil in my cronometer, but I think it has substantially more omega 6 than does coconut oil.

1
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 08, 2012
at 07:41 PM

I have a question for you, Stacey.

Not trying to be inflammatory at all; I'm just honestly curious.

When you say that coconut oil "goes against anything I have ever learned," (and we've all assumed it's strictly because of its saturated fat content), what are your thoughts (based on your RD training) on eliminating whole grains and dairy? I would think those two ideas also contradict a lot of what you've learned.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:04 AM

(And the glut of n-6 in the standard American diet is itself inflammatory, so it's a double whammy.) But it's really nice to hear a dietician connect the dots between insulin resistance/blood glucose control problems and whole grains. :) You are a welcome voice! Grains might be okay for some people, but not everyone, and certainly not in the quantities we're recommended to eat.

65a71b413326bad1894eafdaf8260a7d

on June 09, 2012
at 12:57 AM

No offense to your question Amy as I am really struggling with this. The issue in saturated fats is related to their effect on LDL production and atherosclerosis. That said, I do understand that inflammation can be more the culprit than the fat itself. This eating high fruits and veggies provide many anti-oxidants. Regarding whole grains, I do think insulin intolerance is a result of too much sugar in our diet Andon I'm willing to forgo the grains but not the fruits. From reading the responses, fruit seems to be more a personal choice for weight loss. I love fruit and won't let that go :)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:02 AM

Yeah, the inflammation is a major factor, as is the degree of oxidation of the fatty acids in the membranes of the lipoproteins themselves that can lead to atherosclerosis. And how do they incorporate oxidized fatty acids? Lots of chemically unstable polyunsaturated vegetable and seed oils - margarine, soybean oil, cottonseed, sunflower, safflower, etc. The more saturated fats are your safest for cooking since they're the most stable when heated and least prone to oxidation.

0
01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on June 09, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Yeah just so your head explodes even more, there are people who argue that high fiber intake is harmful...

And I believe them.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 09, 2012
at 05:57 PM

If you don't want to eat coconut oil, don't eat it. If you want to eat fruit, eat it.

0
B514acafd0a6cc251279b6cb21b48941

on June 08, 2012
at 04:58 PM

You don't have to give up fruit all together, just try to limit it. Like Joy said, you can also get your fiber and vitamins from veggies. When you're eating fruit, just try to be mindful of which fruits are going to give you the most bang for your buck. Apples and pears will be the highest in fiber and berries give you tons of vitamins with a minimal amount of sugar. I try to avoid bananas (even though I love them) because they're packed with sugar, and I just try to get my potassium from spinach and broccoli. I personally don't use coconut oil, simply because I prefer olive oil, but fat is your friend, and it's one of the hardest lessons to learn when switching to paleo.

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

(1453)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Bananas are mostly glucose, very little fructose, and are considered a "safe starch." There are also scientists who maintain that the whole need for fiber is vastly overrated, another harmful dietary myth. http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/fiber/a-cautionary-tale-of-mucus-fore-and-aft/ Basically you need to rethink virtually everything you were ever taught as a dietician, I'd guess -- according to Paleo-informed science most of it is wrong.

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