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Burro di Chianti Recipe? (Whipped pig fat?)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 21, 2012 at 10:49 PM

Does anyone have a recipe for this? I saw it as part of a two day pig butchering course in NYC (http://rec.iceculinary.com/Courses/Detail/14229 ) and it sounds delicious!

The only hint it gives is "whipped, seasoned pig fat.". A search online didn't find anything.

Help! More ways to eat yummy fat :)

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on April 22, 2012
at 01:04 AM

Awesome. You've heard of it, and that second recipe seems to match the second one I found exactly!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on April 22, 2012
at 12:33 AM

No problem! Food is a passion of mine, and I had fun digging into this one.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 21, 2012
at 11:42 PM

I wish I could give you more than +1 for this... You researched it and then researched it more! Plus I <3 Anthony Bourdain.

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2 Answers

best answer

4
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on April 21, 2012
at 11:43 PM

Reach out to ICE or the chef, I see via the link that all the info is given so you can track them down easily. If they are like any of the chefs I know - the recipe, or something close, will be given to you.

If you want to make at home, a great reference for anything fatty is Jennifer McLagans Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, with Recipes book.

I've heard of two ways to make it. 1. Take a hung of lardo, run through a meat grinder, then whip with a fork or in your mixer with some salt and pepper to keep it simple or play with flavour components. 2. Not whip it, and no need to use lardo, but: 1/3 lb of pork back fat or leaf lard, 1 small clove of garlic, mashed into a paste, 1 teaspoon of sherry vinegar (or red wine vinegar), salt, pepper, rosemary to taste

Grind the fat through the smallest setting on your meat grinder. Add the garlic and vinegar and begin massaging air into it. As you work with the fat, folding in air, it will get softer and softer. Add in salt and pepper and rosemary and begin to taste. It will need a decent amount of salt to bring out the full flavors, though go more sparsely on the pepper and rosemary for that big pig flavor.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on April 22, 2012
at 01:04 AM

Awesome. You've heard of it, and that second recipe seems to match the second one I found exactly!

2
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on April 21, 2012
at 11:09 PM

Best guess from the bit of research I did is that it's a regional variety of lardo, or cured hog fat, whipped after curing. "Burro" is butter.

My "food Italian" isn't great, but the Italian grammar similar to Spanish. I think "Burro di Chianti" translates to "Butter from Chanti", referring to where the dish originated in Tuscany. If Chianti were a star ingredient, the phrasing should be "Burro con Chianti", although that's not a hard rule.

UPDATE: Ooh! Ooh! Ooh! Look what I found! It's not exactly the same name, but I'm pretty sure it's what you want. Anthony Bourdain did a show in Tuscany. I believe that's the same one (it's not on my TiVo, unfortunately) where he had lardo with Dario Cecchini, who is referenced in the link.

UPDATE 2: I think we have a winner in the above update. Dario Cecchini is, indeed, in The Chianti region. It may not be the specific recipe used in your link, but it's regionally accurate.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 21, 2012
at 11:42 PM

I wish I could give you more than +1 for this... You researched it and then researched it more! Plus I <3 Anthony Bourdain.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on April 22, 2012
at 12:33 AM

No problem! Food is a passion of mine, and I had fun digging into this one.

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